Impostors in the Temple

A Blueprint for Improving Higher Education in America
Author: Martin Anderson
Publisher: Hoover Inst Press
ISBN: N.A
Category: Education
Page: 265
View: 2659

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Impostors in the Temple, a hard-hitting, eye-opening book about the intellectual and moral decay of American universities and colleges, has been updated and expanded in this new paperback edition from the Hoover Institution Press. Martin Anderson - a former White House policy adviser to Presidents Nixon and Reagan and a member of the academic world for more than three decades - takes U.S. academics to task in this powerful book, which has been hailed for its scope and clarity. Topics include the corrupt practices now rampant in our universities: how professors have abandoned the classroom, turning over much of their teaching responsibilities to unqualified students, and how intellectual standards, in both grading and research, have sunk to new lows. Anderson offers a bold blueprint for restoring the intellectual integrity of American universities, one that would allow them to achieve the greatness they are capable of. He concludes on an optimistic note, pointing out that many of our elite universities have recognized the seriousness of the intellectual declines that took place during the 1970s and 1980s and are beginning, quietly and slowly, to clean their academic houses.

In the Name of Education


Author: Jonas E. Alexis
Publisher: Xulon Press
ISBN: 1600347606
Category: Poetry
Page: 411
View: 1366

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Alexis convincingly examines the crisis in education from a Christian perspective. (Social Issues)

Historical Identities

The Professoriate in Canada
Author: E. Lisa Panayotidis,Paul Stortz
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442659424
Category: History
Page: 450
View: 2633

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As intellectual engines of the university, professors hold considerable authority and play an important role in society. By nature of their occupation, they are agents of intellectual culture in Canada. Historical Identities is a new collection of essays examining the history of the professoriate in Canada. Framing the volume with the question, 'What was it like to be a professor?' editors Paul Stortz and E. Lisa Panayotidis, along with an esteemed group of Canadian historians, strive to uncover and analyze variables and contexts – such as background, education, economics, politics, gender, and ethnicity – in the lives of academics throughout Canada's history. The contributors take an in-depth approach to topics such as academic freedom, professors and the state, faculty development, discipline construction and academic cultures, religion, biography, gender and faculty wives, images of professors, and background and childhood experiences. Including the best and most recent critical research in the field of the social history of higher education and professors, Historical Identities examines fundamental and challenging topics, issues, and arguments on the role and nature of intellectualism in Canada.

Ethics in Education


Author: David E. W. Fenner
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780815330882
Category: Education
Page: 346
View: 5801

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First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Ph.D. Trap Revisited


Author: Wilfred Cude
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1550023454
Category: Education
Page: 333
View: 8451

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This book lays bare the faults of the Ph.D. program, showing that in most disciplines it is savage, mechanical, and cruel.

The Questions of Tenure


Author: Richard Chait
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674029348
Category: Education
Page: 352
View: 9623

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To some, tenure is essential to academic freedom and a magnet to recruit and retain top-flight faculty. To others, it is an impediment to professorial accountability and a constraint on institutional flexibility and finances. But beyond anecdote and opinion, what do we really know about how tenure works? In this unique book, Richard Chait and his colleagues offer the results of their research on key empirical questions. Are there circumstances under which faculty might voluntarily relinquish tenure? When might new faculty actually prefer non-tenure track positions? Does the absence of tenure mean the absence of shared governance? Why have some colleges abandoned tenure while others have adopted it? Answers to these and other questions come from careful studies of institutions that mirror the American academy: research universities and liberal arts colleges, including both highly selective and less prestigious schools. The questions of tenure offers vivid pictures of academic subcultures. Chait and his colleagues conclude that context counts so much that no single tenure system exists.

Completing Your Doctoral Dissertation/Master's Thesis in Two Semesters or Less


Author: Evelyn Hunt Ogden
Publisher: R&L Education
ISBN: 1461648440
Category: Education
Page: 158
View: 9519

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A long-term bestseller, this book is a pragmatic step-by-step guide to completing you dissertation or thesis during two semesters, in fifty workdays or less. It covers advisor and topic selection, proposal development, data collection and organization, available assistance, writing, and defense. The author demystifies the process and provides you with essential guidance through the rites of passage that are an integral part of completing your degree.

Excellence Without a Soul

How a Great University Forgot Education
Author: Harry Lewis
Publisher: PublicAffairs
ISBN: 9781586483937
Category: Education
Page: 320
View: 519

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America's great research universities are the envy of the world—and none more so than Harvard. Never before has the competition for excellence been fiercer. But while striving to be unsurpassed in the quality of its faculty and students, Universities have forgotten that the fundamental purpose of undergraduate education is to turn young people into adults who will take responsibility for society. In Excellence Without a Soul, Harry Lewis, a Harvard professor for more than thirty years and Dean of Harvard College for eight, draws from his experience to explain how our great universities have abandoned their mission. Harvard is unique; it is the richest, oldest, most powerful university in America, and so it has set many standards, for better or worse. Lewis evaluates the failures of this grand institution—from the hot button issue of grade inflation to the recent controversy over Harvard's handling of date rape cases—and makes an impassioned argument for change. The loss of purpose in America's great colleges is not inconsequential. Harvard, Yale, Stanford—these places drive American education, on which so much of our future depends. It is time to ask whether they are doing the job we want them to do.

The Impostor Queen


Author: Sarah Fine
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1481441922
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 432
View: 6264

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The elders chose Elli to be queen, but they chose wrong in this beautifully crafted novel that “fans of Rae Carson’s books and Victoria Areyard’s Red Queen will find much to love in” (VOYA). Sixteen-year-old Elli was a small child when the Elders of Kupari chose her to succeed the Valtia, the queen who wields infinitely powerful ice and fire magic. Since then, Elli has lived in the temple, surrounded by luxury and tutored by priests, as she prepares for the day when the Valtia perishes and the magic finds a new home in her. Elli is destined to be the most powerful Valtia to ever rule. But when the queen dies defending the kingdom from invading warriors, the magic doesn’t enter Elli. It’s nowhere to be found. Disgraced, Elli flees to the outlands, the home of banished criminals—some who would love to see the temple burn with all its priests inside. As she finds her footing in this new world, Elli uncovers devastating new information about the Kupari magic, those who wield it, and the prophecy that foretold her destiny. Torn between the love she has for her people and her growing loyalty to the banished, Elli struggles to understand the true role she was meant to play. But as war looms, she must align with the right side—before the kingdom and its magic are completely destroyed.

Unmasked by the Marquess

The Regency Impostors
Author: Cat Sebastian
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062820656
Category: Fiction
Page: 320
View: 3966

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The one you love… Robert Selby is determined to see his sister make an advantageous match. But he has two problems: the Selbys have no connections or money and Robert is really a housemaid named Charity Church. She’s enjoyed every minute of her masquerade over the past six years, but she knows her pretense is nearing an end. Charity needs to see her beloved friend married well and then Robert Selby will disappear…forever. May not be who you think… Alistair, Marquess of Pembroke, has spent years repairing the estate ruined by his wastrel father, and nothing is more important than protecting his fortune and name. He shouldn’t be so beguiled by the charming young man who shows up on his doorstep asking for favors. And he certainly shouldn’t be thinking of all the disreputable things he’d like to do to the impertinent scamp. But is who you need… When Charity’s true nature is revealed, Alistair knows he can’t marry a scandalous woman in breeches, and Charity isn’t about to lace herself into a corset and play a respectable miss. Can these stubborn souls learn to sacrifice what they’ve always wanted for a love that is more than they could have imagined?

In the Pronaos of the Temple of Wisdom

Containing the History of the True and the False Rosicrucians : with an Introduction Into the Mysteries of the Hermetic Philosophy
Author: Franz Hartmann
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Rosicrucians
Page: 134
View: 1241

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Revelation


Author: Will Self
Publisher: Canongate Books
ISBN: 0857861018
Category: Bibles
Page: 64
View: 4763

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The final book of the Bible, Revelation prophesies the ultimate judgement of mankind in a series of allegorical visions, grisly images and numerological predictions. According to these, empires will fall, the "Beast" will be destroyed and Christ will rule a new Jerusalem. With an introduction by Will Self.

Prophetic Figures in Late Second Temple Jewish Palestine

The Evidence from Josephus
Author: Rebecca Gray
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195344899
Category: Religion
Page: 256
View: 3695

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Isolated passages from the writings of Josephus are routinely cited in general studies of early Jewish prophecy, but the present work is the first comprehensive examination of this material. Gray begins with a discussion of the significance of the belief--widely attested in Jewish sources from the late Second Temple period--that prophecy had ceased. She proceeds to outline a general theory about the nature and status of prophecy in this period. Giving careful consideration to the prophetic claims that Josephus makes for himself, she argues that these claims are more substantial and more important for understanding Josephus than is usually thought. Gray goes on to examine Josephus' reports concerning prophecy among the Essenes and Pharisees, and his accounts of the activities of the "sign prophets" and other figures. In every instance, Gray interprets the evidence about prophecy in relation to Josephus' personal career and his thought and work as a whole. Drawing on a range of evidence, much of which has not played a significant role in other studies of early Jewish prophecy, this book is essential reading for anyone interested in Josephus, the history of prophecy in Israel, or the historical Jesus.

Ring of Intrigue


Author: Jane Fancher
Publisher: D A W Books, Incorporated
ISBN: 9780886777197
Category: Fiction
Page: 752
View: 1199

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The three Rhomandi brothers attempt to unify their strife-torn families and thus ensure the security of the Rhomatum Syndicate of Nodes, but their satellite worlds are threatened by an impending war with Mauritum. Original.

Academically Adrift

Limited Learning on College Campuses
Author: Richard Arum,Josipa Roksa
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226028577
Category: Education
Page: 272
View: 8726

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In spite of soaring tuition costs, more and more students go to college every year. A bachelor’s degree is now required for entry into a growing number of professions. And some parents begin planning for the expense of sending their kids to college when they’re born. Almost everyone strives to go, but almost no one asks the fundamental question posed by Academically Adrift: are undergraduates really learning anything once they get there? For a large proportion of students, Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa’s answer to that question is a definitive no. Their extensive research draws on survey responses, transcript data, and, for the first time, the state-of-the-art Collegiate Learning Assessment, a standardized test administered to students in their first semester and then again at the end of their second year. According to their analysis of more than 2,300 undergraduates at twenty-four institutions, 45 percent of these students demonstrate no significant improvement in a range of skills—including critical thinking, complex reasoning, and writing—during their first two years of college. As troubling as their findings are, Arum and Roksa argue that for many faculty and administrators they will come as no surprise—instead, they are the expected result of a student body distracted by socializing or working and an institutional culture that puts undergraduate learning close to the bottom of the priority list. Academically Adrift holds sobering lessons for students, faculty, administrators, policy makers, and parents—all of whom are implicated in promoting or at least ignoring contemporary campus culture. Higher education faces crises on a number of fronts, but Arum and Roksa’s report that colleges are failing at their most basic mission will demand the attention of us all.