Human Dispersal and Species Movement

From Prehistory to the Present
Author: Nicole Boivin,Rémy Crassard,Michael Petraglia
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316738264
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
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How have humans colonised the entire planet and reshaped its ecosystems in the process? This unique and groundbreaking collection of essays explores human movement through time, the impacts of these movements on landscapes and other species, and the ways in which species have co-evolved and transformed each other as a result. Exploring the spread of people, plants, animals, and diseases through processes of migration, colonisation, trade and travel, it assembles a broad array of case studies from the Pliocene to the present. The contributors from disciplines across the humanities and natural sciences are senior or established scholars in the fields of human evolution, archaeology, history, and geography.

First Migrants

Ancient Migration in Global Perspective
Author: Peter Bellwood
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118325893
Category: Social Science
Page: 328
View: 1362

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The first publication to outline the complex global story of human migration and dispersal throughout the whole of human prehistory. Utilizing archaeological, linguistic and biological evidence, Peter Bellwood traces the journeys of the earliest hunter-gatherer and agriculturalist migrants as critical elements in the evolution of human lifeways. The first volume to chart global human migration and population dispersal throughout the whole of human prehistory, in all regions of the world An archaeological odyssey that details the initial spread of early humans out of Africa approximately two million years ago, through the Ice Ages, and down to the continental and island migrations of agricultural populations within the past 10,000 years Employs archaeological, linguistic and biological evidence to demonstrate how migration has always been a vital and complex element in explaining the evolution of the human species Outlines how significant migrations have affected population diversity in every region of the world Clarifies the importance of the development of agriculture as a migratory imperative in later prehistory Fully referenced with detailed maps throughout

Globalization in Prehistory

Contact, Exchange, and the 'People Without History'
Author: Nicole Boivin,Michael D. Frachetti
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108647499
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
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Globalization in Prehistory challenges traditional historical and archaeological discourse about the drivers of social and cultural connectivity in the ancient world. It presents archaeological case studies of emerging globalization from around the word, from the Mesolithic period, through the Bronze and Iron Ages, to more recent historical times. The volume focuses on those societies and communities that history has bypassed - nomads, pastoralists, fishers, foragers, pirates and traders, among others. It aims for a more complex understanding of the webs of connectivity that shaped communities living outside and beyond the urban, agrarian states that are the mainstay of books and courses on ancient civilizations and trade. Written by a team of international experts, the rich and variable case studies demonstrate the important role played by societies that were mobile and dispersed in the making of a more connected world long before the modern era.

Plants and People in the African Past

Progress in African Archaeobotany
Author: Anna Maria Mercuri,A. Catherine D'Andrea,Rita Fornaciari,Alexa Höhn
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319898396
Category: Science
Page: 576
View: 7254

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There is an essential connection between humans and plants, cultures and environments, and this is especially evident looking at the long history of the African continent. This book, comprising current research in archaeobotany on Africa, elucidates human adaptation and innovation with respect to the exploitation of plant resources. In the long-term perspective climatic changes of the environment as well as human impact have posed constant challenges to the interaction between peoples and the plants growing in different countries and latitudes. This book provides an insight into/overview of the manifold routes people have taken in various parts Africa in order to make a decent living from the provisions of their environment by bringing together the analyses of macroscopic and microscopic plant remains with ethnographic, botanical, geographical and linguistic research. The numerous chapters cover almost all the continent countries, and were prepared by most of the scholars who study African archaeobotany, i.e. the complex and composite history of plant uses and environmental transformations during the Holocene.

After Eden

The Evolution of Human Domination
Author: Kirkpatrick Sale
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822339380
Category: History
Page: 186
View: 4044

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Sale asserts that vestiges of a more ecologically sound way of life do exist today, offering redemptive possibilities for ourselves and for the planet."--BOOK JACKET.

Causes and Consequences of Human Migration

An Evolutionary Perspective
Author: Michael H. Crawford,Benjamin C. Campbell
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107012864
Category: Science
Page: 550
View: 6292

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Up-to-date and comprehensive, this book is an integration of the biological, cultural and historical dimensions of population movement.

The Social Archaeology of Food

Thinking about Eating from Prehistory to the Present
Author: Christine A. Hastorf
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316710416
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
View: 9739

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This book offers a global perspective on the role food has played in shaping human societies, through both individual and collective identities. It integrates ethnographic and archaeological case studies from the European and Near Eastern Neolithic, Han China, ancient Cahokia, Classic Maya, the Inka and many other periods and regions, to ask how the meal in particular has acted as a social agent in the formation of society, economy, culture and identity. Drawing on a range of social theorists, Hastorf provides a theoretical toolkit essential for any archaeologist interested in foodways. Studying the social life of food, this book engages with taste, practice, the meal and the body to discuss power, identity, gender and meaning that creates our world as it created past societies.

The Humans Who Went Extinct

Why Neanderthals Died Out and We Survived
Author: Clive Finlayson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199239193
Category: Science
Page: 273
View: 3714

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Originally published in hardcover: Oxford; New York: Oxford Universtiy Press, 2009.

Deep History

The Architecture of Past and Present
Author: Andrew Shryock,Daniel Lord Smail,Timothy K. Earle
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520274628
Category: History
Page: 360
View: 1961

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This breakthrough book brings science into history to offer a dazzling new vision of humanity across time. Team-written by leading experts in a variety of fields, it maps events, cultures, and eras across millions of years to present a new scale for understanding the human body, energy and ecosystems, language, food, kinship, migration, and more.

Emergence and Diversity of Modern Human Behavior in Paleolithic Asia


Author: Yousuke Kaifu,Masami Izuho,Ted Goebel,Hiroyuki Sato,Akira Ono
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1623492777
Category: Social Science
Page: 592
View: 6697

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Despite the obvious geographic importance of eastern Asia in human migration, its discussion in the context of the emergence and dispersal of modern humans has been rare. Emergence and Diversity of Modern Human Behavior in Paleolithic Asia focuses long-overdue scholarly attention on this under-studied area of the world. Arising from a 2011 symposium sponsored by the National Museum of Nature and Science in Tokyo, this book gathers the work of archaeologists from the Pacific Rim of Asia, Australia, and North America, to address the relative lack of attention given to the emergence of modern human behavior as manifested in Asia during the worldwide dispersal from Africa.

Emigrating Beyond Earth

Human Adaptation and Space Colonization
Author: Cameron Smith,Evan T. Davies
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461411653
Category: Science
Page: 290
View: 9901

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Emigrating Beyond Earth puts space colonization into the context of human evolution. Rather than focusing on the technologies and strategies needed to colonize space, the authors examine the human and societal reasons for space colonization. They make space colonization seems like a natural step by demonstrating that if will continue the human species' 4 million-year-old legacy of adaptation to difficult new environments. The authors present many examples from the history of human expansion into new environments, including two amazing tales of human colonization - the prehistoric settlement of the upper Arctic around 5,000 years ago and the colonization of the Pacific islands around 3,000 years ago - which show that space exploration is no more about rockets and robots that Arctic exploration was about boating!

Climate Change in Prehistory

The End of the Reign of Chaos
Author: William James Burroughs
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521070102
Category: Science
Page: 372
View: 5381

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How did humankind deal with the extreme challenges of the last Ice Age? How have the relatively benign post-Ice Age conditions affected the evolution and spread of humanity across the globe? By setting our genetic history in the context of climate change during prehistory, the origin of many features of our modern world are identified and presented in this illuminating book. It reviews the aspects of our physiology and intellectual development that have been influenced by climatic factors, and how features of our lives - diet, language and the domestication of animals - are also the product of the climate in which we evolved. In short: climate change in prehistory has in many ways made us what we are today. Climate Change in Prehistory weaves together studies of the climate with anthropological, archaeological and historical studies, and will fascinate all those interested in the effects of climate on human development and history.

Human Migration

Investigate the Global Journey of Humankind
Author: Judy Dodge Cummings
Publisher: Nomad Press
ISBN: 1619303728
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 128
View: 2144

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About 200,000 years ago, humans arose as a species on the continent of Africa. How did they get to the rest of the world? When did they leave, why, and what did they use for transportation? Whether by bamboo raft or Boeing 747, whether to escape political persecution or because of climate change, migration is a recurring pattern throughout the human history of the world. In Human Migration: Investigate the Global Journey of Humankind, readers ages 12 to 15 retrace the paths taken by our ancestors, starting with the very first steps away from African soil. Understanding who has migrated, from where, when, and why helps us understand the shared history of humans across the world and the future that links us together. Kids discover how archaeologists, paleoanthropologists, linguists, and geneticists piece together different parts of the puzzle of ancient migration. Open-ended, inquiry-based activities and links to primary sources help readers draw inferences and analyze how these human journeys have changed where and how people live. Human Migration takes readers on a journey from our common ancestry to our shared future on an increasingly fragile planet.

Culture and Communication

An Introduction
Author: James M. Wilce
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108158307
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
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James M. Wilce's new textbook introduces students to the study of language as a tool in anthropology. Solidly positioned in linguistic anthropology, it is the first textbook to combine clear explanations of language and linguistic structure with current anthropological theory. It features a range of study aids, including chapter summaries, learning objectives, figures, exercises, key terms and suggestions for further reading, to guide student understanding. The complete glossary includes both anthropological and linguist terminology. An Appendix features material on phonetics and phonetic representation. Accompanying online resources include a test bank with answers, useful links, an instructor's manual, and a sign language case study. Covering an extensive range of topics not found in existing textbooks, including semiotics and the evolution of animal and human communication, this book is an essential resource for introductory courses on language and culture, communication and culture, and linguistic anthropology.

Material Cultures, Material Minds

The Impact of Things on Human Thought, Society, and Evolution
Author: Nicole Boivin (Ph. D.)
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521873975
Category: History
Page: 269
View: 2049

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An exploration of how the physicality of the material world shapes our thoughts, emotions, cosmological frameworks, social relations and our bodies.

Understanding Climate's Influence on Human Evolution


Author: Committee on the Earth system Context for Hominin Evolution,Board on Earth Sciences and Resources,Division on Earth and Life Studies,National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309148383
Category: Science
Page: 128
View: 8728

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The hominin fossil record documents a history of critical evolutionary events that have ultimately shaped and defined what it means to be human, including the origins of bipedalism; the emergence of our genus Homo; the first use of stone tools; increases in brain size; and the emergence of Homo sapiens, tools, and culture. The Earth's geological record suggests that some evolutionary events were coincident with substantial changes in African and Eurasian climate, raising the possibility that critical junctures in human evolution and behavioral development may have been affected by the environmental characteristics of the areas where hominins evolved. Understanding Climate's Change on Human Evolution explores the opportunities of using scientific research to improve our understanding of how climate may have helped shape our species. Improved climate records for specific regions will be required before it is possible to evaluate how critical resources for hominins, especially water and vegetation, would have been distributed on the landscape during key intervals of hominin history. Existing records contain substantial temporal gaps. The book's initiatives are presented in two major research themes: first, determining the impacts of climate change and climate variability on human evolution and dispersal; and second, integrating climate modeling, environmental records, and biotic responses. Understanding Climate's Change on Human Evolution suggests a new scientific program for international climate and human evolution studies that involve an exploration initiative to locate new fossil sites and to broaden the geographic and temporal sampling of the fossil and archeological record; a comprehensive and integrative scientific drilling program in lakes, lake bed outcrops, and ocean basins surrounding the regions where hominins evolved and a major investment in climate modeling experiments for key time intervals and regions that are critical to understanding human evolution.

Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies


Author: Jared Diamond
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393609294
Category: History
Page: 528
View: 7705

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"Fascinating.... Lays a foundation for understanding human history."—Bill Gates In this "artful, informative, and delightful" (William H. McNeill, New York Review of Books) book, Jared Diamond convincingly argues that geographical and environmental factors shaped the modern world. Societies that had had a head start in food production advanced beyond the hunter-gatherer stage, and then developed religion --as well as nasty germs and potent weapons of war --and adventured on sea and land to conquer and decimate preliterate cultures. A major advance in our understanding of human societies, Guns, Germs, and Steel chronicles the way that the modern world came to be and stunningly dismantles racially based theories of human history. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the Phi Beta Kappa Award in Science, the Rhone-Poulenc Prize, and the Commonwealth club of California's Gold Medal.

The Hand

How Its Use Shapes the Brain, Language, and Human Culture
Author: Frank R. Wilson
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0679740473
Category: Science
Page: 397
View: 4928

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Drawing from anthropology, physiology, and neurology, and using the examples of jugglers, surgeons, musicians, and puppetmakers, the author explores the role of the hand in how humans learn and form their identities. Reprint. 25,000 first printing.

Global Health in Africa

Historical Perspectives on Disease Control
Author: Tamara Giles-Vernick,James L. A. Webb Jr.
Publisher: Ohio University Press
ISBN: 0821444719
Category: Medical
Page: 264
View: 1163

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Global Health in Africa is a first exploration of selected histories of global health initiatives in Africa. The collection addresses some of the most important interventions in disease control, including mass vaccination, large-scale treatment and/or prophylaxis campaigns, harm reduction efforts, and nutritional and virological research. The chapters in this collection are organized in three sections that evaluate linkages between past, present, and emergent. Part I, “Looking Back,” contains four chapters that analyze colonial-era interventions and reflect upon their implications for contemporary interventions. Part II, “The Past in the Present,” contains essays exploring the historical dimensions and unexamined assumptions of contemporary disease control programs. Part III, “The Past in the Future,” examines two fields of public health intervention in which efforts to reduce disease transmission and future harm are premised on an understanding of the past. This much-needed volume brings together international experts from the disciplines of demography, anthropology, and historical epidemiology. Covering health initiatives from smallpox vaccinations to malaria control to HIV campaigns, Global Health in Africa offers a first comprehensive look at some of global health’s most important challenges.