How to Study as a Mathematics Major


Author: Lara Alcock
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191637351
Category: Mathematics
Page: 288
View: 8155

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Every year, thousands of students in the USA declare mathematics as their major. Many are extremely intelligent and hardworking. However, even the best will encounter challenges, because upper-level mathematics involves not only independent study and learning from lectures, but also a fundamental shift from calculation to proof. This shift is demanding but it need not be mysterious — research has revealed many insights into the mathematical thinking required, and this book translates these into practical advice for a student audience. It covers every aspect of studying as a mathematics major, from tackling abstract intellectual challenges to interacting with professors and making good use of study time. Part 1 discusses the nature of upper-level mathematics, and explains how students can adapt and extend their existing skills in order to develop good understanding. Part 2 covers study skills as these relate to mathematics, and suggests practical approaches to learning effectively while enjoying undergraduate life. As the first mathematics-specific study guide, this friendly, practical text is essential reading for any mathematics major.

How to Study as a Mathematics Major


Author: Lara Alcock
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191637343
Category: Mathematics
Page: 288
View: 5899

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Every year, thousands of students in the USA declare mathematics as their major. Many are extremely intelligent and hardworking. However, even the best will encounter challenges, because upper-level mathematics involves not only independent study and learning from lectures, but also a fundamental shift from calculation to proof. This shift is demanding but it need not be mysterious — research has revealed many insights into the mathematical thinking required, and this book translates these into practical advice for a student audience. It covers every aspect of studying as a mathematics major, from tackling abstract intellectual challenges to interacting with professors and making good use of study time. Part 1 discusses the nature of upper-level mathematics, and explains how students can adapt and extend their existing skills in order to develop good understanding. Part 2 covers study skills as these relate to mathematics, and suggests practical approaches to learning effectively while enjoying undergraduate life. As the first mathematics-specific study guide, this friendly, practical text is essential reading for any mathematics major.

How to Study for a Mathematics Degree


Author: Lara Alcock
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191637378
Category: Mathematics
Page: 288
View: 8804

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Every year, thousands of students go to university to study mathematics (single honours or combined with another subject). Many of these students are extremely intelligent and hardworking, but even the best will, at some point, struggle with the demands of making the transition to advanced mathematics. Some have difficulty adjusting to independent study and to learning from lectures. Other struggles, however, are more fundamental: the mathematics shifts in focus from calculation to proof, so students are expected to interact with it in different ways. These changes need not be mysterious - mathematics education research has revealed many insights into the adjustments that are necessary - but they are not obvious and they do need explaining. This no-nonsense book translates these research-based insights into practical advice for a student audience. It covers every aspect of studying for a mathematics degree, from the most abstract intellectual challenges to the everyday business of interacting with lecturers and making good use of study time. Part 1 provides an in-depth discussion of advanced mathematical thinking, and explains how a student will need to adapt and extend their existing skills in order to develop a good understanding of undergraduate mathematics. Part 2 covers study skills as these relate to the demands of a mathematics degree. It suggests practical approaches to learning from lectures and to studying for examinations while also allowing time for a fulfilling all-round university experience. The first subject-specific guide for students, this friendly, practical text will be essential reading for anyone studying mathematics at university.

How to Think About Analysis


Author: Lara Alcock
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191035386
Category: Mathematics
Page: 272
View: 4051

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Analysis (sometimes called Real Analysis or Advanced Calculus) is a core subject in most undergraduate mathematics degrees. It is elegant, clever and rewarding to learn, but it is hard. Even the best students find it challenging, and those who are unprepared often find it incomprehensible at first. This book aims to ensure that no student need be unprepared. It is not like other Analysis books. It is not a textbook containing standard content. Rather, it is designed to be read before arriving at university and/or before starting an Analysis course, or as a companion text once a course is begun. It provides a friendly and readable introduction to the subject by building on the student's existing understanding of six key topics: sequences, series, continuity, differentiability, integrability and the real numbers. It explains how mathematicians develop and use sophisticated formal versions of these ideas, and provides a detailed introduction to the central definitions, theorems and proofs, pointing out typical areas of difficulty and confusion and explaining how to overcome these. The book also provides study advice focused on the skills that students need if they are to build on this introduction and learn successfully in their own Analysis courses: it explains how to understand definitions, theorems and proofs by relating them to examples and diagrams, how to think productively about proofs, and how theories are taught in lectures and books on advanced mathematics. It also offers practical guidance on strategies for effective study planning. The advice throughout is research based and is presented in an engaging style that will be accessible to students who are new to advanced abstract mathematics.

How to Think Like a Mathematician

A Companion to Undergraduate Mathematics
Author: Kevin Houston
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139477055
Category: Mathematics
Page: N.A
View: 8617

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Looking for a head start in your undergraduate degree in mathematics? Maybe you've already started your degree and feel bewildered by the subject you previously loved? Don't panic! This friendly companion will ease your transition to real mathematical thinking. Working through the book you will develop an arsenal of techniques to help you unlock the meaning of definitions, theorems and proofs, solve problems, and write mathematics effectively. All the major methods of proof - direct method, cases, induction, contradiction and contrapositive - are featured. Concrete examples are used throughout, and you'll get plenty of practice on topics common to many courses such as divisors, Euclidean algorithms, modular arithmetic, equivalence relations, and injectivity and surjectivity of functions. The material has been tested by real students over many years so all the essentials are covered. With over 300 exercises to help you test your progress, you'll soon learn how to think like a mathematician.

Mathematics Rebooted

A Fresh Approach to Understanding
Author: Lara Alcock
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0192525948
Category: Mathematics
Page: 220
View: 425

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Would you like to understand more mathematics? Many people would. Perhaps at school you liked mathematics for a while but were then put off because you missed a key idea and kept getting stuck. Perhaps you always liked mathematics but gave it up because your main interest was music or languages or science or philosophy. Or perhaps you studied mathematics to advanced levels, but have now forgotten most of what you once knew. Whichever is the case, this book is for you. It aims to build on what you know, revisiting basic ideas with a focus on meaning. Each chapter starts with an idea from school mathematics - often primary school mathematics - and gradually builds up a network of links to more advanced material. It explores fundamental ideas in depth, using insights from research in mathematics education and psychology to explain why people often get confused, and how to overcome that confusion. For nervous readers, it will build confidence by clarifying basic ideas. For more experienced readers, it will highlight new connections to more advanced material. Throughout, the book explains how mathematicians think, and how ordinary people can understand and enjoy mathematical ideas and arguments. If you would like to be better informed about the intrinsic elegance of mathematics, this engaging guide is the place to start.

Bridging the Gap to University Mathematics


Author: Edward Hurst,Martin Gould
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781848002906
Category: Mathematics
Page: 344
View: 4409

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Helps to ease the transition between school/college and university mathematics by (re)introducing readers to a range of topics that they will meet in the first year of a degree course in the mathematical sciences, refreshing their knowledge of basic techniques and focussing on areas that are often perceived as the most challenging. Each chapter starts with a "Test Yourself" section so that readers can monitor their progress and readily identify areas where their understanding is incomplete. A range of exercises, complete with full solutions, makes the book ideal for self-study.

A Student's Guide to the Study, Practice, and Tools of Modern Mathematics


Author: Donald Bindner,Martin Erickson
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 1439846073
Category: Mathematics
Page: 280
View: 7392

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A Student’s Guide to the Study, Practice, and Tools of Modern Mathematics provides an accessible introduction to the world of mathematics. It offers tips on how to study and write mathematics as well as how to use various mathematical tools, from LaTeX and Beamer to Mathematica® and MapleTM to MATLAB® and R. Along with a color insert, the text includes exercises and challenges to stimulate creativity and improve problem solving abilities. The first section of the book covers issues pertaining to studying mathematics. The authors explain how to write mathematical proofs and papers, how to perform mathematical research, and how to give mathematical presentations. The second section focuses on the use of mathematical tools for mathematical typesetting, generating data, finding patterns, and much more. The text describes how to compose a LaTeX file, give a presentation using Beamer, create mathematical diagrams, use computer algebra systems, and display ideas on a web page. The authors cover both popular commercial software programs and free and open source software, such as Linux and R. Showing how to use technology to understand mathematics, this guide supports students on their way to becoming professional mathematicians. For beginning mathematics students, it helps them study for tests and write papers. As time progresses, the book aids them in performing advanced activities, such as computer programming, typesetting, and research.

How Mathematicians Think

Using Ambiguity, Contradiction, and Paradox to Create Mathematics
Author: William Byers
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691145990
Category: Mathematics
Page: 424
View: 2372

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To many outsiders, mathematicians appear to think like computers, grimly grinding away with a strict formal logic and moving methodically--even algorithmically--from one black-and-white deduction to another. Yet mathematicians often describe their most important breakthroughs as creative, intuitive responses to ambiguity, contradiction, and paradox. A unique examination of this less-familiar aspect of mathematics, How Mathematicians Think reveals that mathematics is a profoundly creative activity and not just a body of formalized rules and results. Nonlogical qualities, William Byers shows, play an essential role in mathematics. Ambiguities, contradictions, and paradoxes can arise when ideas developed in different contexts come into contact. Uncertainties and conflicts do not impede but rather spur the development of mathematics. Creativity often means bringing apparently incompatible perspectives together as complementary aspects of a new, more subtle theory. The secret of mathematics is not to be found only in its logical structure. The creative dimensions of mathematical work have great implications for our notions of mathematical and scientific truth, and How Mathematicians Think provides a novel approach to many fundamental questions. Is mathematics objectively true? Is it discovered or invented? And is there such a thing as a "final" scientific theory? Ultimately, How Mathematicians Think shows that the nature of mathematical thinking can teach us a great deal about the human condition itself.

A Book of Abstract Algebra

Second Edition
Author: Charles C Pinter
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 0486474178
Category: Mathematics
Page: 384
View: 7339

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Accessible but rigorous, this outstanding text encompasses all of the topics covered by a typical course in elementary abstract algebra. Its easy-to-read treatment offers an intuitive approach, featuring informal discussions followed by thematically arranged exercises. This second edition features additional exercises to improve student familiarity with applications. 1990 edition.

Introduction to Mathematical Thinking


Author: Keith J. Devlin
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780615653631
Category: Mathematics
Page: 92
View: 4556

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In the twenty-first century, everyone can benefit from being able to think mathematically. This is not the same as "doing math." The latter usually involves the application of formulas, procedures, and symbolic manipulations; mathematical thinking is a powerful way of thinking about things in the world -- logically, analytically, quantitatively, and with precision. It is not a natural way of thinking, but it can be learned.Mathematicians, scientists, and engineers need to "do math," and it takes many years of college-level education to learn all that is required. Mathematical thinking is valuable to everyone, and can be mastered in about six weeks by anyone who has completed high school mathematics. Mathematical thinking does not have to be about mathematics at all, but parts of mathematics provide the ideal target domain to learn how to think that way, and that is the approach taken by this short but valuable book.The book is written primarily for first and second year students of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) at colleges and universities, and for high school students intending to study a STEM subject at university. Many students encounter difficulty going from high school math to college-level mathematics. Even if they did well at math in school, most are knocked off course for a while by the shift in emphasis, from the K-12 focus on mastering procedures to the "mathematical thinking" characteristic of much university mathematics. Though the majority survive the transition, many do not. To help them make the shift, colleges and universities often have a "transition course." This book could serve as a textbook or a supplementary source for such a course.Because of the widespread applicability of mathematical thinking, however, the book has been kept short and written in an engaging style, to make it accessible to anyone who seeks to extend and improve their analytic thinking skills. Going beyond a basic grasp of analytic thinking that everyone can benefit from, the STEM student who truly masters mathematical thinking will find that college-level mathematics goes from being confusing, frustrating, and at times seemingly impossible, to making sense and being hard but doable.Dr. Keith Devlin is a professional mathematician at Stanford University and the author of 31 previous books and over 80 research papers. His books have earned him many awards, including the Pythagoras Prize, the Carl Sagan Award, and the Joint Policy Board for Mathematics Communications Award. He is known to millions of NPR listeners as "the Math Guy" on Weekend Edition with Scott Simon. He writes a popular monthly blog "Devlin's Angle" for the Mathematical Association of America, another blog under the name "profkeithdevlin", and also blogs on various topics for the Huffington Post.

How to Succeed in College Mathematics

A Guide for the College Mathematics Student
Author: Richard Dahlke
Publisher: Bergway Pub
ISBN: 9780615168036
Category: Mathematics
Page: 622
View: 2531

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Among the many topics featured in this vital guide from a veteran college mathematics professor are: Improving problem solving skills, Satisfying prerequisites, Reading the textbook, Learning symbolic form, Writing mathematics, Managing assignments, Getting the most out of class,

A Mind for Numbers

How to Excel at Math and Science (even If You Flunked Algebra)
Author: Barbara A. Oakley
Publisher: TarcherPerigree
ISBN: 039916524X
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 316
View: 7954

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An engineering professor who started out doing poorly in mathematical and technical subjects in school offers tools, tips and techniques to learning the creative and analytical thought processes that will lead to achievement in math and science. Original.

Calculus I


Author: Jerrold Marsden,Alan Weinstein
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461250242
Category: Mathematics
Page: 388
View: 9450

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The goal of this text is to help students learn to use calculus intelligently for solving a wide variety of mathematical and physical problems. This book is an outgrowth of our teaching of calculus at Berkeley, and the present edition incorporates many improvements based on our use of the first edition. We list below some of the key features of the book. Examples and Exercises The exercise sets have been carefully constructed to be of maximum use to the students. With few exceptions we adhere to the following policies. • The section exercises are graded into three consecutive groups: (a) The first exercises are routine, modelled almost exactly on the exam ples; these are intended to give students confidence. (b) Next come exercises that are still based directly on the examples and text but which may have variations of wording or which combine different ideas; these are intended to train students to think for themselves. (c) The last exercises in each set are difficult. These are marked with a star (*) and some will challenge even the best students. Difficult does not necessarily mean theoretical; often a starred problem is an interesting application that requires insight into what calculus is really about. • The exercises come in groups of two and often four similar ones.

Book of Proof


Author: Richard H. Hammack
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780989472111
Category: Mathematics
Page: 314
View: 4012

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This book is an introduction to the language and standard proof methods of mathematics. It is a bridge from the computational courses (such as calculus or differential equations) that students typically encounter in their first year of college to a more abstract outlook. It lays a foundation for more theoretical courses such as topology, analysis and abstract algebra. Although it may be more meaningful to the student who has had some calculus, there is really no prerequisite other than a measure of mathematical maturity.

Discovering Higher Mathematics

Four Habits of Highly Effective Mathematicians
Author: Alan Levine,Alan L. Levine
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 9780124454606
Category: Mathematics
Page: 174
View: 7330

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Funded by a National Science Foundation grant, Discovering Higher Mathematics emphasizes four main themes that are essential components of higher mathematics: experimentation, conjecture, proof, and generalization. The text is intended for use in bridge or transition courses designed to prepare students for the abstraction of higher mathematics. Students in these courses have normally completed the calculus sequence and are planning to take advanced mathematics courses such as algebra, analysis and topology. The transition course is taken to prepare students for these courses by introducing them to the processes of conjecture and proof concepts which are typically not emphasized in calculus, but are critical components of advanced courses. * Constructed around four key themes: Experimentation, Conjecture, Proof, and Generalization * Guidelines for effective mathematical thinking, covering a variety of interrelated topics * Numerous problems and exercises designed to reinforce the key themes

How to Win at Mathematics

A Guide to Turn Yourself from a Poor Math Student Into an Outstanding One
Author: Sahil Bora
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781542447010
Category:
Page: 40
View: 4209

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How to win at Mathematics has consistently been a top 10 best seller in Mathematics Study & Teaching in the USA and Australia. The book has had over 1800 downloads, helping math students all over the world. Are you a struggling math student? Then this is the perfect guide for you on how to learn Mathematics better. How to win at mathematics is a clear and useful guide to help students in university or high school achieve better grades even if you have been a failing math student in the past. With each chapter going into detail of how to apply the learning tactics, it can transform your grades from failing to outstanding without having to spend hours locked up in the library studying or resorting to rote memorization when you don't understand a concept. You will learn how to Take math notes Make sure you understand concepts with the magic of obtaining insight Drill down concepts you have no idea about with examples of how to do it Efficiently complete tutorial/problem sets Prepare and ace assessments

Occupational Outlook Handbook 2009


Author: U. S. Department of Labor
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Inc.
ISBN: 1602393206
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 890
View: 4137

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A directory for up-and-coming jobs in the near-future employment market includes recommendations for finding or advancing a career and draws on statistics from the U.S. Department of Labor, in a guide that includes coverage of more than 250 occupations. Original.

Maths: A Student's Survival Guide

A Self-Help Workbook for Science and Engineering Students
Author: Jenny Olive
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521017077
Category: Mathematics
Page: 634
View: 7083

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First published in 1998.

Mathematical Omnibus

Thirty Lectures on Classic Mathematics
Author: D. B. Fuks,Serge Tabachnikov
Publisher: American Mathematical Soc.
ISBN: 0821843168
Category: Mathematics
Page: 463
View: 683

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The book consists of thirty lectures on diverse topics, covering much of the mathematical landscape rather than focusing on one area. The reader will learn numerous results that often belong to neither the standard undergraduate nor graduate curriculum and will discover connections between classical and contemporary ideas in algebra, combinatorics, geometry, and topology. The reader's effort will be rewarded in seeing the harmony of each subject. The common thread in the selected subjects is their illustration of the unity and beauty of mathematics. Most lectures contain exercises, and solutions or answers are given to selected exercises. A special feature of the book is an abundance of drawings (more than four hundred), artwork by an accomplished artist, and about a hundred portraits of mathematicians. Almost every lecture contains surprises for even the seasoned researcher.