Hitler's Furies

German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields
Author: Wendy Lower
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547863381
Category: History
Page: 270
View: 6233

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A history of German women in the Holocaust reveals their roles as plunderers, witnesses, and actual executioners on the Eastern front, describing how nurses, teachers, secretaries, and wives responded to what they believed to be Nazi opportunities only to perform brutal duties.

Hitler's Furies

German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields
Author: Wendy Lower
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547807414
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 9033

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“Compelling . . . Lower brings to the forefront an unexplored aspect of the Holocaust.” —Washington Post In a surprising account that powerfully revises history, Wendy Lower uncovers the role of German women on the Nazi eastern front—not only as plunderers and direct witnesses, but as actual killers. Lower, drawing on twenty years of archival research and fieldwork, presents startling evidence that these women were more than “desk murderers” or comforters of murderous German men: they went on “shopping sprees” and romantic outings to the Jewish ghettos; they were present at killing-field picnics, not only providing refreshment but also shooting Jews. And Lower uncovers the stories of SS wives with children of their own whose brutality is as chilling as any in history. Hitler’s Furies challenges our deepest beliefs: women can be as brutal as men, and the evidence can be hidden for seventy years. “Disquieting . . . Earlier books about the Holocaust have offered up poster girls of brutality and atrocity . . . [Lower’s] insight is to track more mundane lives, and to argue for a vastly wider complicity.” —New York Times “An unsettling but significant contribution to our understanding of how nationalism, and specifically conceptions of loyalty, are normalized, reinforced, and regulated.” —Los Angeles Review of Books

Hitler's Furies

German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields
Author: Wendy Lower
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1448113458
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 8248

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Hitler’s Furies is the untold story of the Holocaust. History has it that the role of women in Nazi Germany was to be the perfect Hausfrau and a loyal cheerleader for the Führer. However, Lower’s research reveals an altogether more sinister truth. Lower shows us the ordinary women who became perpetrators of genocide. Drawing on decades of research, she uncovers a truth that has been in the shadows – that women too were brutal killers and that, in ignoring women’s culpability, we have ignored the reality of the Holocaust. ‘Shocking’ Sunday Times‘ Compelling’ Washington Post ‘Pioneering’ Literary Review A National Book Award Finalist

Mothers in the Fatherland

Women, the Family and Nazi Politics
Author: Claudia Koonz
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136213805
Category: History
Page: 600
View: 6737

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From extensive research, including a remarkable interview with the unrepentant chief of Hitler’s Women’s Bureau, this book traces the roles played by women – as followers, victims and resisters – in the rise of Nazism. Originally publishing in 1987, it is an important contribution to the understanding of women’s status, culpability, resistance and victimisation at all levels of German society, and a record of astonishing ironies and paradoxical morality, of compromise and courage, of submission and survival.

Contending with Hitler

Varieties of German Resistance in the Third Reich
Author: David Clay Large
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521466684
Category: History
Page: 197
View: 5156

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A distillation of recent scholarship on Germany's domestic resistance to the Nazi dictatorship.

Nurses in Nazi Germany

Moral Choice in History
Author: Bronwyn Rebekah McFarland-Icke
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691006659
Category: History
Page: 343
View: 5281

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This book tells the story of German nurses who, directly or indirectly, participated in the Nazis' "euthanasia" measures against patients with mental and physical disabilities, measures that claimed well over 100,000 victims from 1939 to 1945. How could men and women who were trained to care for their patients come to kill or assist in murder or mistreatment? This is the central question pursued by Bronwyn McFarland-Icke as she details the lives of nurses from the beginning of the Weimar Republic through the years of National Socialist rule. Rather than examine what the Party did or did not order, she looks into the hearts and minds of people whose complicity in murder is not easily explained with reference to ideological enthusiasm. Her book is a micro-history in which many of the most important ethical, social, and cultural issues at the core of Nazi genocide can be addressed from a fresh perspective. McFarland-Icke offers gripping descriptions of the conditions and practices associated with psychiatric nursing during these years by mining such sources as nursing guides, personnel records, and postwar trial testimony. Nurses were expected to be conscientious and friendly caretakers despite job stress, low morale, and Nazi propaganda about patients' having "lives unworthy of living." While some managed to cope with this situation, others became abusive. Asylum administrators meanwhile encouraged nurses to perform with as little disruption and personal commentary as possible. So how did nurses react when ordered to participate in, or tolerate, the murder of their patients? Records suggest that some had no conflicts of conscience; others did as they were told with regret; and a few refused. The remarkable accounts of these nurses enable the author to re-create the drama taking place while sharpening her argument concerning the ability and the willingness to choose.

Women in the Holocaust


Author: Dalia Ofer,Lenore J. Weitzman
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300080803
Category: History
Page: 402
View: 4746

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Annotation As Jews throughout Europe faced Nazi persecution, Jewish women-wives, daughters, mothers-encountered special problems and had particular vulnerabilities. This is the first book of original scholarship devoted to women in the Holocaust. Testimonies of Holocaust survivors and chapters by eminent historians, sociologists, and literary experts shed light on women's lives in the ghettos, the Jewish resistance movement, and the concentration camps. By examining women's unique responses, their incredible resourcefulness, their courage, and their suffering, the book enhances our understanding of the experiences of all Jews during the Nazi era. Book jacket.

Experience and Expression

Women, the Nazis, and the Holocaust
Author: Elizabeth R. Baer
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 0814338860
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 3702

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The many powerful accounts of the Holocaust have given rise to women’s voices, and yet few researchers have analyzed these perspectives to learn what the horrifying events meant for women in particular and how they related to them. In Experience and Expression, the authors take on this challenge, providing the first book-length gendered analysis of women and the Holocaust, a topic that is emerging as a new field of inquiry in its own right. Accessible to readers on many levels, the essays portray the experiences of women of various religious and ethnic backgrounds, and draw from the fields of English, religion, nursing, history, law, comparative literature, philosophy, French, and German. The collection explores an array of fascinating topics: rescue and resistance, the treatment of Roma and Sinti women, the fate of female forced laborers, Holocaust politics, nurses at so-called euthanasia centers, women’s experiences of food and hunger in the camps, the uses and abuses of Anne Frank, and the representations of the Holocaust in art, film, and literature in the postwar era. The introduction provides a thorough overview of the current status of research in the field, and each essay seeks to push the theoretical boundaries that shape our understanding of women’s experience and agency during the Holocaust and of the ways in which they have expressed their memories.

Women in Nazi Society


Author: Jill Stephenson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136247408
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 5600

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This fascinating book examines the position of women under the Nazis. The National Socialist movement was essentially male-dominated, with a fixed conception of the role women should play in society; while man was the warrior and breadwinner, woman was to be the homemaker and childbearer. The Nazi obsession with questions of race led to their insisting that women should be encouraged by every means to bear children for Germany, since Germany’s declining birth rate in the 1920s was in stark contrast with the prolific rates among the 'inferior' peoples of eastern Europe, who were seen by the Nazis as Germany’s foes. Thus, women were to be relieved of the need to enter paid employment after marriage, while higher education, which could lead to ambitions for a professional career, was to be closed to girls, or, at best, available to an exceptional few. All Nazi policies concerning women ultimately stemmed from the Party’s view that the German birth rate must be dramatically raised.

Between Dignity and Despair

Jewish Life in Nazi Germany
Author: Marion A. Kaplan
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195313581
Category: History
Page: 303
View: 8672

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Between Dignity and Despair draws on the extraordinary memoirs, diaries, interviews, and letters of Jewish women and men to give us the first intimate portrait of Jewish life in Nazi Germany. Kaplan tells the story of Jews in Germany not from the hindsight of the Holocaust, nor by focusing on the persecutors, but from the bewildered and ambiguous perspective of Jews trying to navigate their daily lives in a world that was becoming more and more insane. Answering the charge that Jews should have left earlier, Kaplan shows that far from seeming inevitable, the Holocaust was impossible to foresee precisely because Nazi repression occurred in irregular and unpredictable steps until the massive violence of Novemer 1938. Then the flow of emigration turned into a torrent, only to be stopped by the war. By that time Jews had been evicted from their homes, robbed of their possessions and their livelihoods, shunned by their former friends, persecuted by their neighbors, and driven into forced labor. For those trapped in Germany, mere survival became a nightmare of increasingly desperate options. Many took their own lives to retain at least some dignity in death; others went underground and endured the fears of nightly bombings and the even greater terror of being discovered by the Nazis. Most were murdered. All were pressed to the limit of human endurance and human loneliness. Focusing on the fate of families and particularly women's experience, Between Dignity and Despair takes us into the neighborhoods, into the kitchens, shops, and schools, to give us the shape and texture, the very feel of what it was like to be a Jew in Nazi Germany.

Women of the Third Reich


Author: Anna Maria Sigmund
Publisher: Nde Pub
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 236
View: 9835

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Examines the lives of eight women who were a part of the Nazi regime or played a role in its ascendency.

Nazi Women

The Attraction of Evil
Author: Paul Roland
Publisher: Arcturus Publishing
ISBN: 1784280461
Category: Political Science
Page: 256
View: 4391

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After the failure of the Weimar Republic, the Nazis believed their mission was to 'masculinize' life in Germany. Hermann Goering told women, "Take a pot, a dustpan and a broom, and marry a man", but many became active Nazis, helping to spread wide the net of evil.

Nazi Empire-Building and the Holocaust in Ukraine


Author: Wendy Lower
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807876916
Category: History
Page: 328
View: 9320

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On 16 July 1941, Adolf Hitler convened top Nazi leaders at his headquarters in East Prussia to dictate how they would rule the newly occupied eastern territories. Ukraine, the "jewel" in the Nazi empire, would become a German colony administered by Heinrich Himmler's SS and police, Hermann Goring's economic plunderers, and a host of other satraps. Focusing on the Zhytomyr region and weaving together official German wartime records, diaries, memoirs, and personal interviews, Wendy Lower provides the most complete assessment available of German colonization and the Holocaust in Ukraine. Midlevel "managers," Lower demonstrates, played major roles in mass murder, and locals willingly participated in violence and theft. Lower puts names and faces to local perpetrators, bystanders, beneficiaries, as well as resisters. She argues that Nazi actions in the region evolved from imperial arrogance and ambition; hatred of Jews, Slavs, and Communists; careerism and pragmatism; greed and fear. In her analysis of the murderous implementation of Nazi "race" and population policy in Zhytomyr, Lower shifts scholarly attention from Germany itself to the eastern outposts of the Reich, where the regime truly revealed its core beliefs, aims, and practices.

The Death Marches


Author: Daniel Blatman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674059190
Category: History
Page: 592
View: 4145

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Blatman writes about the end phase of the German concentration camp system when the Nazis, realizing that they were losing the war, were faced with the enormous problem of what to do with the people being held captive. As these camps were being evacuated, the collapse of the front in Poland and the advance of the Red Army generated frantic waves of flight and the evacuation of millions of civilians and soldiers. The panicky retreat created conditions under which prisoners were murdered in horrific death marches. Gas chambers in faraway camps were no longer in use, and now the slaughters took place on the very doorsteps of ordinary German civilians' homes and in the streets German and Austrian towns. Unknown numbers of ordinary civilians across the dissolving Reich, fearing for the fate of their families and property, participated in the lethal eruption of violence. The book is divided into two sections. The first part provides an detailed overview of the camp system and a thorough chronological treatment of the camp evacuations during the winter of 1944-45 and the spring of 1945. The second part is a case study of the atrocity in the German town of Gardelegen where over 1000 prisoners were murdered, along with about 400 in the surrounding villages. This event serves as a focused example of the breakdown of the evacuation plans at the end of the war.

Hitler's Girls

Doves Amongst Eagles
Author: Tim Heath
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 1526705354
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 8020

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Hitler's Girls is not just another Hitler Youth history book. Concentrating purely on the role of German girls in Hitler’s Third Reich, we learn of their home lives, schooling, exploitation and eventual militarization from firsthand accounts of women who were indoctrinated into the Jung Madel and Bund Deutcscher Madel as young girls. From the prosperous beginnings of 1933 to the cataclysmic defeat of 1945, this insightful book examines in detail their specific roles as defined by the Nazi state. Few historical literary works have gone as deep to find the truth, the conscience and the regret, and in this sense Hitler's Girls is a unique work unlike any other so far published. Written in an attempt to provide a definitive voice for this unheard generation of German females, it will leave the reader to decide for themselves whether or not the girls were the obedient accessories to genocide, and it will lead many readers to question many aspects of what they have previously thought about the role of girls and young women in Hitler’s Third Reich. This is their story.

Birth, Sex and Abuse

Women's Voices Under Nazi Rule
Author: Beverley Chalmers (Dsc(med) Phd)
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781781483534
Category: Eugenics
Page: 374
View: 7505

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This book is a fascinating and gripping examination of birth, sex and abuse during the Nazi era. Dr Chalmers' unique lens on the Holocaust provides a stunning and controversial expose of the voices of both Jewish and non-Jewish women living under Nazi rule. Based on twelve years of study, the book takes an inter-disciplinary view incorporating women's history, Holocaust studies, social sciences and medicine, in a unique, cutting-edge examination of what women themselves said, thought and did."

Himmler's Nazi Concentration Camp Guards


Author: Ian Baxter,Charles Markuss
Publisher: Pen & Sword
ISBN: 9781848847996
Category: History
Page: 112
View: 7303

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This book is the most thorough study yet of the whole process of recruitment, indoctrination and performance of those responsible for the guarding of concentration camp inmates. It is not an attractive subject – the conversion of human beings into murderers and individuals routinely carrying out appalling acts of cruelty is bound to be shocking. But it happened under the Third Reich on a massive scale. Of the 55,000 Nazi concentration camp guards, some 3,700 were women. The book studies their behaviour with examples along with that of their male counter-parts. The book follows the development of concentration camps from the early beginnings in the 1930s (Buchenwald, Sachsenhausen etc), through their establishment in the conquered territories of Poland and Czechoslovakia to the extermination camps (Dachau, Auschwitz). In parallel it describes, using original source material, the behaviour of the guards who became in numerous cases immune to the horrors around them. This is well borne out by the conduct of the guards during the Liberation process which is also movingly described using numerous personal accounts of shocked Allied personnel.

Ravensbruck

Life and Death in Hitler's Concentration Camp for Women
Author: Sarah Helm
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 0385539118
Category: History
Page: 768
View: 4629

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A masterly and moving account of the most horrific hidden atrocity of World War II: Ravensbrück, the only Nazi concentration camp built for women On a sunny morning in May 1939 a phalanx of 867 women—housewives, doctors, opera singers, politicians, prostitutes—was marched through the woods fifty miles north of Berlin, driven on past a shining lake, then herded in through giant gates. Whipping and kicking them were scores of German women guards. Their destination was Ravensbrück, a concentration camp designed specifically for women by Heinrich Himmler, prime architect of the Holocaust. By the end of the war 130,000 women from more than twenty different European countries had been imprisoned there; among the prominent names were Geneviève de Gaulle, General de Gaulle’s niece, and Gemma La Guardia Gluck, sister of the wartime mayor of New York. Only a small number of these women were Jewish; Ravensbrück was largely a place for the Nazis to eliminate other inferior beings—social outcasts, Gypsies, political enemies, foreign resisters, the sick, the disabled, and the “mad.” Over six years the prisoners endured beatings, torture, slave labor, starvation, and random execution. In the final months of the war, Ravensbrück became an extermination camp. Estimates of the final death toll by April 1945 have ranged from 30,000 to 90,000. For decades the story of Ravensbrück was hidden behind the Iron Curtain, and today it is still little known. Using testimony unearthed since the end of the Cold War and interviews with survivors who have never talked before, Sarah Helm has ventured into the heart of the camp, demonstrating for the reader in riveting detail how easily and quickly the unthinkable horror evolved. Far more than a catalog of atrocities, however, Ravensbrück is also a compelling account of what one survivor called “the heroism, superhuman tenacity, and exceptional willpower to survive.” For every prisoner whose strength failed, another found the will to resist through acts of self-sacrifice and friendship, as well as sabotage, protest, and escape. While the core of this book is told from inside the camp, the story also sheds new light on the evolution of the wider genocide, the impotence of the world to respond, and Himmler’s final attempt to seek a separate peace with the Allies using the women of Ravensbrück as a bargaining chip. Chilling, inspiring, and deeply unsettling, Ravensbrück is a groundbreaking work of historical investigation. With rare clarity, it reminds us of the capacity of humankind both for bestial cruelty and for courage against all odds. From the Hardcover edition.