Hip Hop's Amnesia

From Blues and the Black Women's Club Movement to Rap and the Hip Hop Movement
Author: Reiland Rabaka
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739174924
Category: Music
Page: 354
View: 895

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What did rap music and hip hop culture inherit from the spirituals, classic blues, ragtime, classic jazz, and bebop? What did rap music and hip hop culture inherit from the Black Women's Club Movement, New Negro Movement, Harlem Renaissance, Hipster Movement, and Black Muslim Movement? In Hip Hop's Amnesia award-winning author, spoken-word artist, and multi-instrumentalist Reiland Rabaka answers these questions by rescuing and reclaiming the often-overlooked early twentieth century origins and evolution of rap music and hip hop culture.

The Hip Hop Movement

From R&B and the Civil Rights Movement to Rap and the Hip Hop Generation
Author: Reiland Rabaka
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739181173
Category: Social Science
Page: 516
View: 3543

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Connecting classic rhythm & blues and rock & roll to the Civil Rights Movement, and classic soul and funk to the Black Power Movement, The Hip Hop Movement critically explores what each of these musics and movements contributed to rap, neo-soul, hip hop culture, and the broader Hip Hop Movement.

Hip Hop's Inheritance

From the Harlem Renaissance to the Hip Hop Feminist Movement
Author: Reiland Rabaka
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739164821
Category: Music
Page: 302
View: 4087

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Hip Hop's Inheritance arguably offers the first book-length treatment of what hip hop culture has, literally, 'inherited' from the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts movement, the Feminist Art movement, and 1980s and 1990s postmodern aesthetics. By comparing and contrasting the major motifs of the aforementioned cultural aesthetic traditions with those of hip hop culture, all the while critically exploring the origins and evolution of black popular culture from antebellum America through to 'Obama's America,' Hip Hop's Inheritance demonstrates that the Hip Hop generation is not the first generation of young black folk preoccupied with spirituality and sexuality, race and religion, entertainment and athletics, or ghetto culture and bourgeois culture.

Hip Hop's Inheritance

From the Harlem Renaissance to the Hip Hop Feminist Movement
Author: Reiland Rabaka
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739164821
Category: Music
Page: 302
View: 2484

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Hip Hop's Inheritance arguably offers the first book-length treatment of what hip hop culture has, literally, 'inherited' from the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts movement, the Feminist Art movement, and 1980s and 1990s postmodern aesthetics. By comparing and contrasting the major motifs of the aforementioned cultural aesthetic traditions with those of hip hop culture, all the while critically exploring the origins and evolution of black popular culture from antebellum America through to 'Obama's America,' Hip Hop's Inheritance demonstrates that the Hip Hop generation is not the first generation of young black folk preoccupied with spirituality and sexuality, race and religion, entertainment and athletics, or ghetto culture and bourgeois culture.

Know What I Mean?

Reflections on Hip Hop
Author: Michael Eric Dyson
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 1458776131
Category: Music
Page: 222
View: 1901

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Whether along race, class or generational lines, hip-hop music has been a source of controversy since the beats got too big and the voices too loud for the block parties that spawned them. America has condemned and commended this music and the culture that inspires it. Dubbed ''the Hip-Hop Intellectual' by critics and fans for his pioneering explorations of rap music in the academy and beyond, Michael Eric Dyson is uniquely situated to probe the most compelling and controversial dimensions of hip-hop culture. Know What I Mean? addresses salient issues within hip hop: the creative expression of degraded youth that has garnered them global exposure; the vexed gender relations that have made rap music a lightning rod for pundits; the commercial explosion that has made an art form a victim of its success; the political elements that have been submerged in the most popular form of hip hop; and the intellectual engagement with some of hip hops most influential figures. In spite of changing trends, both in the music industry and among the intelligentsia, Dyson has always supported and interpreted this art that bloomed un watered, and in many cases, unwanted from our inner cities. For those who wondered what all the fuss is about in hip hop, Dysons bracing and brilliant book breaks it all down.

That's the Joint!

The Hip-hop Studies Reader
Author: Murray Forman,Mark Anthony Neal
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415969192
Category: Music
Page: 628
View: 6713

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Spanning 25 years of serious writing on hip-hop by noted scholars and mainstream journalists, this comprehensive anthology includes observations and critiques on groundbreaking hip-hop recordings.

American Amnesia

How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper
Author: Jacob S. Hacker,Paul Pierson
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1451667833
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 464
View: 5975

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"A spirited examination of why what's good for American business elites and what's good for Americans have become misaligned"--Front jacket flap.

Hope in the Dark

Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities
Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Haymarket Books
ISBN: 1608465799
Category: Social Science
Page: 192
View: 2114

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"No writer has better understood the mix of fear and possibility, peril and exuberance that's marked this new millennium." —Bill McKibben A book as powerful and influential as Rebecca Solnit's Men Explain Things to Me, her Hope in the Dark was written to counter the despair of radicals at a moment when they were focused on their losses and had turned their back to the victories behind them—and the unimaginable changes soon to come. In it, she makes a radical case for hope as a commitment to act in a world whose future remains uncertain and unknowable. Drawing on her decades of activism and a wide reading of environmental, cultural, and political history, Solnit argued that radicals have a long, neglected history of transformative victories, that the positive consequences of our acts are not always immediately seen, directly knowable, or even measurable, and that pessimism and despair rest on an unwarranted confidence about what is going to happen next. Now, with a moving new introduction explaining how the book came about and a new afterword that helps teach us how to hope and act in our unnerving world, she brings a new illumination to the darkness of 2016 in an unforgettable new edition of this classic book. Writer, historian, and activist Rebecca Solnit is the author of eighteen or so books on feminism, western and indigenous history, popular power, social change and insurrection, wandering and walking, hope and disaster, including the books Men Explain Things to Me and Hope in the Dark, both also with Haymarket; a trilogy of atlases of American cities; The Faraway Nearby; A Paradise Built in Hell: The Extraordinary Communities that Arise in Disaster; A Field Guide to Getting Lost; Wanderlust: A History of Walking; and River of Shadows, Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West (for which she received a Guggenheim, the National Book Critics Circle Award in criticism, and the Lannan Literary Award). A product of the California public education system from kindergarten to graduate school, she is a columnist at Harper's and a regular contributor to the Guardian.

Prophets of the Hood

Politics and Poetics in Hip Hop
Author: Imani Perry
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822386151
Category: Music
Page: 248
View: 2278

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At once the most lucrative, popular, and culturally oppositional musical force in the United States, hip hop demands the kind of interpretation Imani Perry provides here: criticism engaged with this vibrant musical form on its own terms. A scholar and a fan, Perry considers the art, politics, and culture of hip hop through an analysis of song lyrics, the words of the prophets of the hood. Recognizing prevailing characterizations of hip hop as a transnational musical form, Perry advances a powerful argument that hip hop is first and foremost black American music. At the same time, she contends that many studies have shortchanged the aesthetic value of rap by attributing its form and content primarily to socioeconomic factors. Her innovative analysis revels in the artistry of hip hop, revealing it as an art of innovation, not deprivation. Perry offers detailed readings of the lyrics of many hip hop artists, including Ice Cube, Public Enemy, De La Soul, krs-One, OutKast, Sean “Puffy” Combs, Tupac Shakur, Lil’ Kim, Biggie Smalls, Nas, Method Man, and Lauryn Hill. She focuses on the cultural foundations of the music and on the form and narrative features of the songs—the call and response, the reliance on the break, the use of metaphor, and the recurring figures of the trickster and the outlaw. Perry also provides complex considerations of hip hop’s association with crime, violence, and misogyny. She shows that while its message may be disconcerting, rap often expresses brilliant insights about existence in a society mired in difficult racial and gender politics. Hip hop, she suggests, airs a much wider, more troubling range of black experience than was projected during the civil rights era. It provides a unique public space where the sacred and the profane impulses within African American culture unite.

From Bomba to Hip-hop

Puerto Rican Culture and Latino Identity
Author: Juan Flores
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231110778
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 265
View: 9886

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"Essential reading for understanding both national and panethnic issues that influence cultural expression and the construction of Puerto Rican identity in the US. Analyzes distinctiveness of Puerto Rican culture in New York in relation to that of other US Latino groups. Theoretically grounded essays address many of the contradictions behind the complex process of identity construction among Puerto Ricans and other Latinos. Focuses on popular music and literature"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 58.

Nation of Cowards

Black Activism in Barack Obama’s Post-Racial America
Author: David H. Ikard,Martell Lee Teasley
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253007011
Category: Social Science
Page: 176
View: 4807

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In a speech from which Nation of Cowards derives its title, Attorney General Eric Holder argued forcefully that Americans today need to talk more—not less—about racism. This appeal for candid talk about race exposes the paradox of Barack Obama’s historic rise to the US presidency and the ever-increasing social and economic instability of African American communities. David H. Ikard and Martell Lee Teasley maintain that such a conversation can take place only with passionate and organized pressure from black Americans, and that neither Obama nor any political figure is likely to be in the forefront of addressing issues of racial inequality and injustice. The authors caution blacks not to slip into an accommodating and self-defeating "post-racial" political posture, settling for the symbolic capital of a black president instead of demanding structural change. They urge the black community to challenge the social terms on which it copes with oppression, including acts of self-imposed victimization.

From Black Power to Hip Hop

Racism, Nationalism, and Feminism
Author: Patricia Hill Collins
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 9781592137909
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 447

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A provocative analysis of the new contours of black nationalism and feminism in America.

Decoded


Author: Jay-Z
Publisher: Spiegel & Grau
ISBN: 1588369595
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 336
View: 9916

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Decoded is a book like no other: a collection of lyrics and their meanings that together tell the story of a culture, an art form, a moment in history, and one of the most provocative and successful artists of our time. Praise for Decoded “Compelling . . . provocative, evocative . . . Part autobiography, part lavishly illustrated commentary on the author’s own work, Decoded gives the reader a harrowing portrait of the rough worlds Jay-Z navigated in his youth, while at the same time deconstructing his lyrics.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times “One of a handful of books that just about any hip hop fan should own.”—The New Yorker “Elegantly designed, incisively written . . . an impressive leap by a man who has never been known for small steps.”—Los Angeles Times “A riveting exploration of Jay-Z’s journey . . . So thoroughly engrossing, it reads like a good piece of cultural journalism.”—The Boston Globe “Shawn Carter’s most honest airing of the experiences he drew on to create the mythic figure of Jay-Z . . . The scenes he recounts along the way are fascinating.”—Entertainment Weekly “Hip-hop’s renaissance man drops a classic. . . . Heartfelt, passionate and slick.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Word from the Mother

Language and African Americans
Author: Geneva Smitherman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134243715
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 192
View: 2858

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Written by the hugely respected linguist, Geneva Smitherman, this book presents a definitive statement on African American English. Enriched by her evocative and inimitable prose style, the study presents an overview of past debates on the speech of African Americans, as well as providing a vision for the future. Featuring cartoons which demonstrate the relationship between language and race, as well as common perceptions of African American Language, she explores its contribution to mainstream American English and includes a summary of expressions as a suggested linguistic core of AAL. As global manifestations of Black Language increase, she argues that, through education, we must broaden our conception of AAL and its speakers, and further examine the implications of gender, age and class on AAL. Perhaps most of all we must appreciate the ‘artistic and linguistic genius’ of AAL, presented in this book through rap and Hip Hop lyrics and the explorations of rhyme and rhetoric in the Black speech community. Word from the Mother is an essential read for students of African American English, language, culture and sociolinguistics, as well as the general reader interested in the worldwide ‘crossover’ of black popular culture.

The Hip Hop Reader


Author: Timothy Francis Strode,Tim Wood
Publisher: Longman Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780321385123
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 239
View: 2287

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Composition and hip hop may seem unrelated, but the connection isn't hard to make: Hip hop and rap rely on a complex of narrative practices that have clear ties to some of the best American essay writing. A Hip Hop Reader brings together work by important writers about this cultural phenomenon and provides lively selections that represent a variety of styles and interests.

Encyclopedia of Rap and Hip-hop Culture


Author: Yvonne Bynoe
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313330582
Category: Music
Page: 449
View: 2793

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Offers a comprehensive guide to the history, development, people, events, and ideas of rap music and hip hop music and culture.

Capitalist Realism

Is there no alternative?
Author: Mark Fisher
Publisher: John Hunt Publishing
ISBN: 1780997345
Category: Philosophy
Page: 92
View: 9615

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After 1989, capitalism has successfully presented itself as the only realistic political-economic system - a situation that the bank crisis of 2008, far from ending, actually compounded. The book analyses the development and principal features of this capitalist realism as a lived ideological framework. Using examples from politics, films, fiction, work and education, it argues that capitalist realism colours all areas of contemporary experience. But it will also show that, because of a number of inconsistencies and glitches internal to the capitalist reality program capitalism in fact is anything but realistic.

Only the Strong Survive

The Odyssey of Allen Iverson
Author: Larry Platt
Publisher: It Books
ISBN: 9780060097745
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 272
View: 8398

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Part sports star, part antihero, part hip-hop icon, Allen Iverson has managed to cross over into the mainstream of American culture -- without compromise. Defiantly tattooed, with his hair in cornrows, the six-foot Philadelphia 76ers point guard is one of the most recognizable and controversial stars of the sports world. His meteoric rise from a troubled childhood in the ghetto to NBA superstardom has been marked by five straight playoff appearances, including a finals berth in 2001 and an MVP award. From his rap sheet to his rap album, fans and journalists alike hound his every move. But never before has a biographer presented a full portrait of this complicated and intensely private star -- a man whose loyalty to his family, the streets, and his friends trumps any other concern. Filled with exclusive interview material and unprecedented access to many of Iverson's inner circle, Only the Strong Survive is the first in-depth look at the truth behind this newly minted legend.

Batman Vol. 7: Endgame


Author: Scott Snyder
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781401261160
Category: Comics & Graphic Novels
Page: N.A
View: 9821

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For years, the Joker has regarded Batman with a sick, twisted love, thinking that one could never exist without the other. But that's all changed. Now the Clown Prince of Crime is done playing. He's going to kill Batman. And he's going to do it using those who Batman loves the most: the Justice League. The Joker returns to Gotham City with a deadlier agenda than ever before, using every tool at his disposal to finally kill the Dark Knight. That includes turning Batman's allies against him in the bloodiest brawl that he's ever had to survive. Batman Vol. 7: Endgame is the biggest, boldest story that the #1 New York Times best-selling creative team of Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo have told to date. With an ending you won't believe, this graphic novel is a classic in the making. Collects Batman #35-40.