Young Henry

The Rise of Henry VIII
Author: Robert Hutchinson
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1250012740
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 368
View: 9799

Continue Reading →

Set during the same years of Henry VIII's life as The Tudors, this book charts his rise as a magnificent and ruthless monarch Immortalized as a domineering king, notorious philanderer, and the unlikely benefactor of a new church, Henry VIII became a legend during his own reign. Who, though, was the young royal who would grow up to become England's most infamous ruler? Robert Hutchinson's Young Henry examines Henry Tudor's childhood beginnings and subsequent rise to power in the most intimate retelling of his early life to date. While Henry's elder brother Arthur was scrupulously groomed for the crown by their autocratic father, the ten-year-old "spare heir" enjoyed a more carefree childhood, given prestige and power without the looming pressures of the throne. Everything changed for the young prince, though, when his brother died. Henry was nine weeks shy of his eighteenth birthday when he inherited both his brother's widow and the crown. As King, Henry preferred magnificence and merriment to his royal responsibilities, sweeping away the musty cobwebs of his father's court with feasting, dancing, and sport. Frustrated, too, by the seeming inability of his wife, Katherine of Aragon, to produce an heir, Henry turned his attention to a prospective second queen whose name would endure as long as his: Anne Boleyn. With the king still lacking a successor by the age of 35, however, the time for youthful frolic had come to an end. Divorcing his wife and the Catholic Church, executing his lover and his violent will, Henry charged forward on a scandalous path of terrifying self-indulgence from which there was no turning back. Young Henry is an illuminating portrait of this tyrannical yet groundbreaking king—before he transformed his country, and the face of the monarchy, irrevocably.

The Autobiography of Henry VIII

With Notes by His Fool, Will Somers: A Novel
Author: Margaret George
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin
ISBN: 9781429924702
Category: Fiction
Page: 960
View: 1032

Continue Reading →

The Autobiography of Henry VIII is the magnificent historical novel that established Margaret George's career. Evocatively written in the first person as Henry VIII's private journals, the novel was the product of fifteen years of meticulous research and five handwritten drafts. Much has been written about the mighty, egotistical Henry VIII: the man who dismantled the Church because it would not grant him the divorce he wanted; who married six women and beheaded two of them; who executed his friend Thomas More; who sacked the monasteries; who longed for a son and neglected his daughters, Mary and Elizabeth; who finally grew fat, disease-ridden, dissolute. Now, in her magnificent work of storytelling and imagination Margaret George bring us Henry VIII's story as he himself might have told it, in memoirs interspersed with irreverent comments from his jester and confident, Will Somers. Brilliantly combining history, wit, dramatic narrative, and an extraordinary grasp of the pleasures and perils of power, this monumental novel shows us Henry the man more vividly than he has ever been seen before.

Henry VIII


Author: Dorothy Turner,Doug Post
Publisher: Bookwright Pr
ISBN: 9780531182031
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 32
View: 9715

Continue Reading →

A brief account of the life of that complex personality, King Henry VIII of England.

Henry VIII

A Study in Kingship
Author: Michael A. R. Graves
Publisher: Longman Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780582381100
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 217
View: 8335

Continue Reading →

Few historical figures are as familiar as King Henry VIII. Few kings have popular images created out of so much misinformation: that he was short, had six wives and a legion of mistresses, contracted syphilis and became a Protestant. Henry was a maze of contradictions and the object of much contemporary praise and criticism, adulation and condemnation. He had impressive strengths but also formidable weaknesses, amongst them inconstancy, financial irresponsibility, and a capacity for brutality. At the same time, his rule was vibrant, often exciting and dramatic, and of major significance for England's future. Michael Graves examines this complex personality and sorts out the reality from the myths to provide a highly readable study of early modern kingship as practised by one man.

Jane Seymour

Henry VIII's True Love
Author: Elizabeth Norton
Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited
ISBN: 144560678X
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 7500

Continue Reading →

The first ever biography of Jane Seymour, Henry VIII's third wife, who died in childbirth giving the king what he craved most - a son and heir.

Who Was Henry VIII?


Author: Ellen Labrecque,Who HQ
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1524788813
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 112
View: 4139

Continue Reading →

Hear Ye, Hear Ye! Travel to the age of the Renaissance and learn why Henry VIII is one of the most famous kings in English history. Mainly remembered for his six marriages and his self-appointment as the "Supreme Head of the Church of England," Henry VIII was also attractive, educated, and athletic. When Henry Tudor ascended to the English thrown at the age of 17, his reign looked promising. But by the time of his death in 1547, King Henry VIII was characterized as an extremely egotistical, harsh, and insecure king. Though Henry VIII's legacy isn't free from scandal, his monarchy thrived due to the achievements of his daughter Queen Elizabeth I.

Henry VIII (Penguin Monarchs)

The Quest for Fame
Author: John Guy
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141977132
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 160
View: 7924

Continue Reading →

Charismatic, insatiable and cruel, Henry VIII was, as John Guy shows, a king who became mesmerized by his own legend - and in the process destroyed and remade England. Said to be a 'pillager of the commonwealth', this most instantly recognizable of kings remains a figure of extreme contradictions: magnificent and vengeful; a devout traditionalist who oversaw a cataclysmic rupture with the church in Rome; a talented, towering figure who nevertheless could not bear to meet people's eyes when he talked to them. In this revealing new account, John Guy looks behind the mask into Henry's mind to explore how he understood the world and his place in it - from his isolated upbringing and the blazing glory of his accession, to his desperate quest for fame and an heir and the terrifying paranoia of his last, agonising, 54-inch-waisted years.

Rich Apparel

Clothing and the Law in Henry VIII's England
Author: Maria Hayward
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351903195
Category: History
Page: 448
View: 7495

Continue Reading →

English dress in the second half of the sixteenth century has been studied in depth, yet remarkably little has been written on the earlier years, or indeed on male clothing for the whole century. The few studies that do cover these neglected areas have tended to be quite general, focusing upon garments rather than the wearers. As such this present volume fills an important gap by providing a detailed analysis of not only what people wore in Henry's reign, but why. The book describes and analyses dress in England through a variety of documents, including warrants and accounts from Henry's Great Wardrobe and the royal household, contemporary narrative sources, legislation enacted by Parliament, guild regulations, inventories and wills, supported with evidence and observations derived from visual sources and surviving garments. Whilst all these sources are utilised, the main focus of the study is built around the sumptuary legislation, or the four 'Acts of Apparel' passed by Henry between 1509 and 1547. English sumptuary legislation was concerned primarily with male dress, and starting at the top of society with the king and his immediate family, it worked its way down through the social hierarchy, but stopped short of the poor who did not have sufficient disposable income to afford the items under consideration. Certain groups - such as women and the clergy - who were specifically excluded from the legislation, are examined in the second half of the book. Combining the consideration of such primary sources with modern scholarly analysis, this book is invaluable for anyone with an interest in the history of fashion, clothing, and consumption in Tudor society.

Catherine de'Medici


Author: R J Knecht
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317896866
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 5251

Continue Reading →

Catherine de' Medici (1519-89) was the wife of one king of France and the mother of three more - the last, sorry representatives of the Valois, who had ruled France since 1328. She herself is of preeminent importance to French history, and one of the most controversial of all historical figures. Despised until she was powerful enough to be hated, she was, in her own lifetime and since, the subject of a "Black Legend" that has made her a favourite subject of historical novelists (most notably Alexandre Dumas, whose Reine Margot has recently had new currency on film). Yet there is no recent biography of her in English. This new study, by a leading scholar of Renaissance France, is a major event. Catherine, a neglected and insignificant member of the Florentine Medici, entered French history in 1533 when she married the son of Francis I for short-lived political reasons: her uncle was pope Clement VII, who died the following year. Now of no diplomatic value, Catherine was treated with contempt at the French court even after her husband's accession as Henry II in 1547. Even so, she gave him ten children before he was killed in a tournament in 1559. She was left with three young boys, who succeeded to the throne as Francis II (1559-60), Charles IX (1560-74) and Henry III (1574-89). As regent and queen-mother, a woman and with no natural power-base of her own, she faced impossible odds. France was accelerating into chaos, with political faction at court and religious conflict throughout the land. As the country disintegrated, Catherine's overriding concern was for the interests of her children. She was tireless in her efforts to protect her sons' inheritance, and to settle her daughters in advantageous marriages. But France needed more. Catherine herself was both peace-loving and, in an age of frenzied religious hatred, unbigoted. She tried to use the Huguenots to counterbalance the growing power of the ultra-Catholic Guises but extremism on all sides frustrated her. She was drawn into the violence. Her name is ineradicably associated with its culmination, the Massacre of St Bartholomew (24 August 1572), when thousands of Huguenots were slaughtered in Paris and elsewhere. To this day no-one knows for certain whether Catherine instigated the massacre or not, but here Robert Knecht explores the probabilities in a notably level-headed fashion. His book is a gripping narrative in its own right. It offers both a lucid exposition of immensely complex events (with their profound imact on the future of France), and also a convincing portrait of its enigmatic central character. In going behind the familiar Black Legend, Professor Knecht does not make the mistake of whitewashing Catherine; but he shows how intractable was her world, and how shifty or intransigent the people with whom she had to deal. For all her flaws, she emerges as a more sympathetic - and, in her pragmatism, more modern - figure than most of her leading contemporaries.

The Reign of Henry VIII

Personalities and Politics
Author: David Starkey
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0099445107
Category: Great Britain
Page: 159
View: 7275

Continue Reading →

Henry VIII was almost never alone. He was surrounded, twenty-four hours a day, by the small group of intimates and personal attendants who made up the staff of his Privy Chamber. They organised his daily life, kept him amused and acted as the landline between the King and the formal machinery of government. These men, intermarried, interbred and close-knit even in their mutual feuding, were supremely well placed to rig politics and patronage for their own benefit. Their influence was important and sometimes decisive: factions in the Privy Chamber destroyed Anne Boleyn, they frustrated the 'Catholic' reaction of the 1540s, and, by doctoring Henry's will, prepared the way for the full-blooded Protestantism of his son's reign. The Reign of Henry the VIII is not so much a book about Henry VIII. It is about the great game of politics over which he presided.

The Books of King Henry VIII and His Wives


Author: James P. Carley
Publisher: London : British Library
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 161
View: 3725

Continue Reading →

King Henry VIII was one of the most intelligent and widely read monarchs of the renaissance. From surviving catalogues, which tell us what books he had, it is clear he was deeply involved in theological debate and monastic history, especially when moving to the break with Rome. At the same time, he was a Humanist scholar ahead of his time in all the liberal arts, especially music and poetry. Equally, most of his wives were also avid readers who collected a variety of books. In this important new work, leading scholar James P. Carley describes Henry VIII's books and their significance for a deeper understanding of this seemingly familiar monarch and his wives. The extensive illustrations allow us to examine the binding and content of the collection, as well as providing some examples of marginalia in Henry's own hand.

The Rise of Thomas Cromwell

Power and Politics in the Reign of Henry VIII, 1485-1534
Author: Michael Everett
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300213085
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 376
View: 6666

Continue Reading →

How much does the Thomas Cromwell of popular novels and television series resemble the real Cromwell? This meticulous study of Cromwell’s early political career expands and revises what has been understood concerning the life and talents of Henry VIII’s chief minister. Michael Everett provides a new and enlightening account of Cromwell’s rise to power, his influence on the king, his role in the Reformation, and his impact on the future of the nation. Controversially, Everett depicts Cromwell not as the fervent evangelical, Machiavellian politician, or the revolutionary administrator that earlier historians have perceived. Instead he reveals Cromwell as a highly capable and efficient servant of the Crown, rising to power not by masterminding Henry VIII’s split with Rome but rather by dint of exceptional skills as an administrator.

Henry VIII: Wolfman


Author: A. E. Moorat
Publisher: Open Road Media
ISBN: 145321593X
Category: Fiction
Page: 416
View: 4353

Continue Reading →

Five hundred years ago Henry VII was known for being larger-than-life, with had a fearsome temper and bloodthirsty reputation to match; more beast than human, some might say Henry VII was the bloodiest king ever to have sat on the throne of England. This fast-paced, exciting, and inventive retelling of his reign will bring to light the real man behind the myth. Be dragged back kicking and screaming to the paranormal world of Tudor England . . .

Court Politics, Culture and Literature in Scotland and England, 1500-1540


Author: Jon Robinson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 135112580X
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 198
View: 7729

Continue Reading →

The focus of this study is court literature in early sixteenth-century England and Scotland. Author Jon Robinson examines courtly poetry and drama in the context of a complex system of entertainment, education, self-fashioning, dissimulation, propaganda and patronage. He places selected works under close critical scrutiny to explore the symbiotic relationship that existed between court literature and important socio-political, economic and national contexts of the period 1500 to 1540. The first two chapters discuss the pervasive influence of patronage upon court literature through an analysis of the panegyric verse that surrounded the coronation of Henry VIII. The rhetorical strategies adopted by courtiers within their literary works, however, differed, depending on whether the writer was, at the time of writing the verse or drama, excluded or included from the environs of the court. The different, often elaborate rhetorical strategies are, through close readings of selected verse, delineated and discussed in chapter three on David Lyndsay and chapter four on Thomas Wyatt and Thomas Elyot.

Thomas Cromwell

The Untold Story of Henry VIII's Most Faithful Servant
Author: Tracy Borman
Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic
ISBN: 0802191665
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 464
View: 9078

Continue Reading →

Thomas Cromwell has captured the imagination for centuries, including recently in Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall and its stage and television adaptations. Long reviled as a Machiavellian schemer who stopped at nothing in his quest for power, in Thomas Cromwell, Tracy Borman reveals a different side of one of the most notorious figures in history: that of a caring husband and father, a fiercely loyal servant and friend, and a revolutionary who helped make medieval England into a modern state. Born in the mid-1480s to a lowly blacksmith, Cromwell left home to make his fortune abroad, serving in the French army, and working in Florence at the height of the Renaissance. Back in England, Cromwell built a flourishing legal practice, became the protégé of Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, and went on to become Henry VIII's top aide, where he was at the heart of the most momentous events of his time, from the Reformation to the downfall of Anne Boleyn. His seismic political, religious, and social reforms can still be felt today.

History, Fiction, and The Tudors

Sex, Politics, Power, and Artistic License in the Showtime Television Series
Author: William B. Robison
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137438835
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 3204

Continue Reading →

This is the first book-length study of the award-winning historical drama The Tudors. In this volume twenty distinguished scholars separate documented history, plausible invention, and outright fantasy in a lively series of scholarly, but accessible and engaging essays. The contributors explore topics including Henry VIII, Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, his other wives and family, gender and sex, kingship, the court, religion, and entertainments.

I, Jane

In the Court of Henry VIII
Author: Diane Haeger
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101599685
Category: Fiction
Page: 416
View: 7658

Continue Reading →

Though her path to the throne was long and paved with treachery, Jane Seymour would win the heart of her king—and heal her own. Jane Seymour of Wiltshire is not meant to go to Court. Not a child like her, with her lack of beauty and no title. But family connections are enough to have her named to the bridal retinue of Mary Tudor. At the French Court, the plain and docile Jane meets the girl who will grow into her rival in years to come: the already charismatic and conniving Anne Boleyn. Soon back home in the English countryside, Jane wants nothing more than peace and quiet—and the devotion of her childhood protector, William Dormer. But his family vows to keep them apart, and Jane is called back to Court to serve Katherine of Aragon, who is fighting for her life as Queen in the face of Anne Boleyn’s open seduction of King Henry VIII. In those turbulent years, Jane will learn the value of loyalty and honesty, while holding fast to her convictions. And it is her unblemished soul that will slowly rise above the chaos—and turn a king’s head. READERS GUIDE INCLUDED

The Burning Time

Henry VIII, Bloody Mary, and the Protestant Martyrs of London
Author: Virginia Rounding
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1466836245
Category: History
Page: 432
View: 6508

Continue Reading →

Smithfield, settled on the fringes of Roman London, was once a place of revelry. Jesters and crowds flocked for the medieval St Bartholomew's Day celebrations, tournaments were plentiful and it became the location of London's most famous meat market. Yet in Tudor England, Smithfield had another, more sinister use: the public execution of heretics. The Burning Time is a vivid insight into an era in which what was orthodoxy one year might be dangerous heresy the next. The first martyrs were Catholics, who cleaved to Rome in defiance of Henry VIII's break with the papacy. But with the accession of Henry's daughter Mary - soon to be nicknamed 'Bloody Mary' - the charge of heresy was leveled against devout Protestants, who chose to burn rather than recant. At the center of Virginia Rounding's vivid account of this extraordinary period are two very different characters. The first is Richard Rich, Thomas Cromwell's protégé, who, almost uniquely, remained in a position of great power, influence and wealth under three Tudor monarchs, and who helped send many devout men and women to their deaths. The second is John Deane, Rector of St Bartholomew's, who was able, somehow, to navigate the treacherous waters of changing dogma and help others to survive. The Burning Time is their story, but it is also the story of the hundreds of men and women who were put to the fire for their faith.

Bessie Blount

Mistress to Henry VIII
Author: Elizabeth Norton
Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited
ISBN: 1445608022
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 7109

Continue Reading →

Wolf Hall

A Novel
Author: Hilary Mantel
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 9781429943284
Category: Fiction
Page: 560
View: 4502

Continue Reading →

In the ruthless arena of King Henry VIII's court, only one man dares to gamble his life to win the king's favor and ascend to the heights of political power England in the 1520s is a heartbeat from disaster. If the king dies without a male heir, the country could be destroyed by civil war. Henry VIII wants to annul his marriage of twenty years, and marry Anne Boleyn. The pope and most of Europe opposes him. The quest for the king's freedom destroys his adviser, the brilliant Cardinal Wolsey, and leaves a power vacuum. Into this impasse steps Thomas Cromwell. Cromwell is a wholly original man, a charmer and a bully, both idealist and opportunist, astute in reading people and a demon of energy: he is also a consummate politician, hardened by his personal losses, implacable in his ambition. But Henry is volatile: one day tender, one day murderous. Cromwell helps him break the opposition, but what will be the price of his triumph? In inimitable style, Hilary Mantel presents a picture of a half-made society on the cusp of change, where individuals fight or embrace their fate with passion and courage. With a vast array of characters, overflowing with incident, the novel re-creates an era when the personal and political are separated by a hairbreadth, where success brings unlimited power but a single failure means death.