Harpers's Weekly 1864 Part 2

Civil War (1861-1865) Illustrations – Series 1864 Part 2 Featuring Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia and Beyond
Author: Walt H. Sirene
Publisher: Walt H. Sirene
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 125
View: 5337

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This is a selective collection of Harper’s Weekly woodcut Civil War images appearing during Mid 1864, along with the original descriptions of illustrations. The focus is Warrenton town and Fauquier County Virginia, and beyond. About This Document -- Several years ago, Fauquier resident Paul Mellon kindly gifted a collection of Harper’s Weekly news magazines to the Fauquier Historical Society. They are a great educational source of engraved images highlighting Civil War events published when most newspapers were only words. The images illuminate the story. Harper’s artists were busy making on-scene images for woodcut engravings including many of Warrenton, Fauquier County and nearby environs in Northern Virginia. Warrenton, the county seat, was of military importance as a commercial crossroads including a railroad branch line terminus. It changed occupiers sixty-seven times during the War. It was the hub for Confederate Col. John S Mosby’s partisan raiders who were citizens by day and raiders at night. With daring raids they strategically kept the Union’s Army of the Potomac bottled up in Northern Virginia protecting /repairing supply lines and Washington DC. Fauquier was also home to many enslaved, about 48% of the population at the beginning of the War. The images are in high resolution and were digitally enhanced to give readers, students and researchers clarity.

Harper's Weekly


Author: John Bonner,George William Curtis,Henry Mills Alden,Samuel Stillman Conant,Montgomery Schuyler,John Foord,Richard Harding Davis,Carl Schurz,Henry Loomis Nelson,John Kendrick Bangs,George Brinton McClellan Harvey,Norman Hapgood
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: American periodicals
Page: N.A
View: 5293

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Harper's Weekly 1863

Civil War (1861-1865) Illustrations – Series 1863 Featuring Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia and beyond
Author: Walt H. Sirene
Publisher: Walt H. Sirene
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 151
View: 3012

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This is a selective collection of Harper’s Weekly woodcut Civil War images appearing during 1863, along with the original descriptions of illustrations. The focus is Warrenton town and Fauquier County Virginia, and beyond. About This Document -- Several years ago, Fauquier resident Paul Mellon kindly gifted a collection of Harper’s Weekly news magazines to the Fauquier Historical Society. They are a great educational source of engraved images highlighting Civil War events published when most newspapers were only words. The images illuminate the War's story. Harper’s artists were busy making on-scene images for woodcut engravings including many of Warrenton, Fauquier County and nearby environs in Northern Virginia. Warrenton, the county seat, was of military importance as a commercial crossroads including a railroad branch line terminus. It changed occupiers sixty-seven times during the War. It was the hub for Confederate Col. John S Mosby’s partisan raiders who were citizens by day and raiders at night. With daring raids they strategically kept the Union’s Army of the Potomac bottled up in Northern Virginia protecting and repairing supply lines and Washington DC. Fauquier was also home to many enslaved, about 48% of the Fauquier County population at the beginning of the War. The images are in high resolution and were digitally enhanced to give readers, students and researchers clarity.

To Live and Die

Collected Stories of the Civil War, 1861–1876
Author: Kathleen Diffley,Kathleen Elizabeth Diffley
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822334392
Category: Fiction
Page: 448
View: 5972

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The editor collects thirty-one stories from popular magazines depicting the horrors found on the battlefields and in the field hospitals of America's bloodiest war, including works by Louisa May Alcott, Mark Twain, and Henry King.

Harper’s Weekly 1865 Part 3- War Ends

Civil War (1861-1865) Illustrations – Series 1865 Part 3 War Ends, Surrender
Author: Walt H. Sirene
Publisher: Walt H. Sirene
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 112
View: 3588

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This is a selective collection of Harper’s Weekly woodcut Civil War images during the first half of 1865. The original descriptions of illustrations and events including Mosby, Petersburg, Richmond, Sherman’s March, Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley, Davis’ capture, etc. The events surrounding Lincoln's murder occurring during this time are in 1865 Part I Lincoln. About Tis Document -- Several years ago, Fauquier resident Paul Mellon kindly gifted a collection of Harper’s Weekly news magazines to the Fauquier Historical Society. They are a great educational source of engraved images highlighting Civil War events published when most newspapers were only words. The images illuminate the story.

In the Presence of Mine Enemies: The Civil War in the Heart of America, 1859-1864


Author: Edward L. Ayers
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393247430
Category: History
Page: 496
View: 6340

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Winner of the Bancroft Prize: Through a gripping narrative based on massive new research, a leading historian reshapes our understanding of the Civil War. Our standard Civil War histories tell a reassuring story of the triumph, in an inevitable conflict, of the dynamic, free-labor North over the traditional, slave-based South, vindicating the freedom principles built into the nation's foundations. But at the time, on the borderlands of Pennsylvania and Virginia, no one expected war, and no one knew how it would turn out. The one certainty was that any war between the states would be fought in their fields and streets. Edward L. Ayers gives us a different Civil War, built on an intimate scale. He charts the descent into war in the Great Valley spanning Pennsylvania and Virginia. Connected by strong ties of every kind, including the tendrils of slavery, the people of this borderland sought alternatives to secession and war. When none remained, they took up war with startling intensity. As this book relays with a vivid immediacy, it came to their doorsteps in hunger, disease, and measureless death. Ayers's Civil War emerges from the lives of everyday people as well as those who helped shape history—John Brown and Frederick Douglass, Lincoln, Jackson, and Lee. His story ends with the valley ravaged, Lincoln's support fragmenting, and Confederate forces massing for a battle at Gettysburg.

Harper’s Weekly 1865 Part 1- Abraham Lincoln

Civil War (1861-1865) Illustrations – Series 1865 Part 1 President Lincoln‘s murder, Assassins’ Trials
Author: Walt H. Sirene
Publisher: Walt H. Sirene
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 152
View: 1169

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This is a selective collection of Harper’s Weekly woodcut Civil War images extracted from throughout the 1865 Harper’s editions with the original descriptions of illustrations and events surrounding Lincoln’s murder About This Document -- Several years ago, Fauquier resident Paul Mellon kindly gifted a collection of Harper’s Weekly news magazines to the Fauquier Historical Society. They are a great educational source of engraved images highlighting Civil War events published when most newspapers were only words. The images illuminate the story. .

The Imagined Civil War

Popular Literature of the North & South, 1861-1865
Author: Alice Fahs
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807854631
Category: History
Page: 424
View: 5614

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Alice Fahs explores a little-known and fascinating side of the Civil War - the outpouring of popular literature inspired by the conflict. From 1861 to 1865, authors and publishers in both the North and the South produced a remarkable variety of war-related compositions, including poems, songs, children's stories, romances, novels, histories, and even humorous pieces. Fahs mines these rich but long-neglected resources to recover the diversity of the war's political and social meanings. Instead of narrowly portraying the Civil War as a clash between two great, white armies, popular literature offered a wide range of representations through which to consider the conflict, as Fahs demonstrates. Works that explored the war's devastating impact on white women's lives, for example, proclaimed the importance of their experiences on the home front, while popular writings that celebrated black manhood and heroism in the wake of emancipation helped readers begin to imagine new roles for blacks in American life. By providing subjects and characters with which a broad spectrum of people could identify, popular literature invited ordinary Americans to envision themselves as active participants in the war and helped shape new modes of imagining the relationships of diverse individuals to the nation.

A. Lincoln, His Last 24 Hours


Author: Waldo Emerson Reck
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 9780899502168
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 232
View: 5933

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Details the last day in President Lincoln's life and the events leading up to his assassination and death, according to all the available and sometimes conflicting evidence

The Irish Potato Famine

Irish Immigrants Come to America (1845-1850)
Author: Jeremy Thornton
Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780823968312
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 24
View: 3943

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Looks at nineteenth-century life in Ireland and how mass starvation caused by the Irish Potato Famine forced two million people to leave their homes and seek a new life elsewhere.

Southern Queen

New Orleans in the Nineteenth Century
Author: Thomas Ruys Smith
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1441158227
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 7868

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New Orleans occupies a singular position within American life. Drawing deeply from Old World traditions and New World possibilities, the port city of the Mississippi has proved a lure to an extraordinary variety of travellers from its very earliest days. New Orleans has always been a world city like no other: it combines the magnolia and moonlight appeal of Southern romanticism, a popular sense of exoticism and decadence, the hint of illicit sex, and a cultural history without compare. However, alongside the glamour there runs another story - of tension, conflict, hardship and destruction. It was in the nineteenth century that the city's most distinctive characteristics were forged, and chapters will be based around signal moments that reveal the city's essential qualities: the Battle of New Orleans in 1815; the World's Fair in 1884; the establishment of Storyville in 1897. Whilst painting a portrait of the public face of New Orleans, the book will look behind the carnival mask to explore aspects of the city's history which have so often been kept hidden from view.

Engraved Prints of Texas

1554 - 1900
Author: Mavis Parrott Kelsey,Robin Brandt Hutchison
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 9781585442706
Category: Art
Page: 478
View: 1325

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For centuries Texas has fired the imagination of artists as well as explorers and settlers. Before modern photography, engravings were the principal type of illustration used by artists to portray images of the state. Now, in this extensive catalogue, authors Mavis P. Kelsey Sr., and Robin Brandt Hutchison have surveyed all engraved illustrations about Texas published before 1900. Engraved Prints of Texas, 1554–1900 presents the whole range of early Texas history as portrayed in published engravings: from the first printed representation of a buffalo in 1554 to a 1900 view of the University of Texas Medical School in Galveston. Entries include information on more than 2000 engravings, 470 of which are illustrated in this volume. Presented chronologically by century and decade of publication, each chapter features a brief introduction to the historical background of the era, highlighting key illustrations and placing the art within the context of major events of the period. Several topical discussions address subjects that span decades or recur as pervasive themes in illustration. Historians, teachers, and scholars will find this catalogue a useful reference for locating pictorial representations of particular events, subjects, or persons. It is an indispensable source for lovers of Texas history and an important contribution to preserving the visual record.

Augusta and Summerville


Author: Joseph M. Lee
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738506166
Category: History
Page: 127
View: 3364

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Augusta and Summerville showcases rare nineteenth-century stereoviews and photographs from the extensive collection of Joseph M. Lee III and the Augusta Museum of History, spanning a 41-year period from 1859 to 1900. The engaging images within these pages were captured on film by some of Augusta's earliest photographers, including J.W. Perkins, John Usher Jr., J.A. Palmer, and H.C. Hall, among others. Most of the images have never been published and provide an unusually valuable source of information about Augusta and its environs. Known the world round for its pristine landscapes and "Garden City" charm, Augusta has always been a photographer's dream. Lush, verdant scenes recall a city yet unmarked by the scars of expansion, still enjoying the tranquility of life in the Old South. Views of early businesses and homes on Broad and Greene Streets, the flood of 1888, local monuments, historic churches and cemeteries, pioneering schools, the early cotton crop, and area waterways all contribute to this visual journey. The reader will delight in scenes of yesteryear, diving deep into the annals of one of Georgia's most beloved cities.

Lafcadio Hearn's America

Ethnographic Sketches and Editorials
Author: Simon J. Bronner
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813156351
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
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The American essays of renowned writer Lafcadio Hearn (1850-1904) artistically chronicle the robust urban life of Cincinnati and New Orleans. Hearn is one of the few chroniclers of urban American life in the nineteenth century, and much of this material has not been widely available since the 1950s. Lafcadio Hearn's America collects Hearn's stories of vagabonds, river people, mystics, criminals, and some of the earliest accounts available of black and ethnic urban folklife in America. He was a frequently consulted expert on America during his years in Japan, and these editorials reflect on the problems and possibilities of American life as the country entered its greatest century. Hearn's work, which reflects an America that is less "melting pot" than a varied, spicy, and often exotic gumbo, provide essential background for the study of America's first steps away from its agrarian beginnings.

Racial, Ethnic, and Homophobic Violence

Killing in the Name of Otherness
Author: Michel Prum,Bénédicte Deschamps,Marie-Claude Barbier
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113664203X
Category: Law
Page: 184
View: 3883

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With contributions by internationally recognized specialists, this book, a perfect complement to courses in criminology and hate crime, provides a key resource for understanding how racism and homophobia work to produce violence. Hate-motivated violence is now deemed a ‘serious national problem’ in most Western societies. With contributions by British, Australian, American, Canadian, Irish, Italian and French researchers, this book addresses a wide spectrum of types of violence, including, genocide, urban riots, inter-ethnic fighting and forms of hate crime targeting gay and lesbian people. Contributors to this volume also consider the political groups responsible for outbursts of hatred, their modes of operation and the institutional aspects of hate crime. Opening up an interdisciplinary perspective on the ways in which certain groups or individuals are transformed into expiatory victims, this compelling book is an essential read for all postgraduate law students and researchers interested in hate crime and society.