Guernica

Painting the End of the World
Author: James Attlee
Publisher: Head of Zeus Ltd
ISBN: 1786691434
Category: History
Page: 96
View: 9998

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Pablo Picasso had already accepted a commission in 1937 to create a work for the Spanish Republican Pavilion at the Paris World Fair when news arrived of the assault by the German Condor Legion on the undefended Basque town of Guernica, in which hundreds of civilians died. James Attlee offers an illuminating account of the genesis, creation and many-stranded afterlife of Picasso's Guernica. He explores the historical context from which it sprang; the artistic influences that informed its execution; the critical responses that it elicited; its journeyings across Europe and America in the late 1930s; its post-war adoption by new generations of anti-war protestors; and its eventual return to Spain following the death of Franco.

Picasso's War


Author: Russell Martin
Publisher: Hol Art Books
ISBN: 1936102250
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 6196

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The destruction of a town, and the creation of a masterpiece--On April 26, 1937, in the late afternoon of a busy market day in the Basque town of Gernika in northern Spain, the German Luftwaffe began the relentless bombing and machine-gunning of buildings and villagers at the request of General Francisco Franco and his rebel forces. Three-and-a-half hours later, the village lay in ruins, its population decimated. This act of terror and unspeakable cruelty--the first intentional, large-scale attack against a nonmilitary target in modern warfare--outraged the world and one man in particular, Pablo Picasso. The renowned artist, an expatriate living in Paris, reacted immediately to the devastation in his homeland by creating the canvas that would become widely considered one of the greatest artworks of the twentieth century--Guernica. Weaving themes of conflict and redemption, of the horrors of war and of the power of art to transfigure tragedy, Russell Martin follows this monumental work from its fevered creation through its journey across decades and continents--from Europe to America and, finally and triumphantly, to democratic Spain. Full of historical sweep and deeply moving drama, Picasso's War delivers an unforgettable portrait of a painting, the dramatic events that led to its creation, and its ongoing power today.

Guernica

The Biography of a Twentieth-Century Icon
Author: Gijs van Hensbergen
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1408841487
Category: Art
Page: 288
View: 8257

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Of all the great paintings in the world, Picasso's Guernica has had a more direct impact on our consciousness than perhaps any other. In this absorbing and revealing book, Gijs van Hensbergen tells the story of this masterpiece. Starting with its origin in the destruction of the Basque town of Gernika in the Spanish Civil War, the painting is then used as a weapon in the propaganda battle against Fascism. Later it becomes the nucleus of the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the detonator for the Big Bang of Abstract Expressionism in the late 1940s. This tale of passion and politics shows the transformation of this work of art into an icon of many meanings, up to its long contested but eventually triumphant return to Spain in 1981.

The Sarpedon Krater


Author: Nigel Spivey
Publisher: Head of Zeus Ltd
ISBN: 1786691604
Category: Art
Page: 256
View: 1307

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Once the pride of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Sarpedon krater is a wine-mixing bowl crafted by two Athenians, Euxitheos (who shaped it) and Euphronios (who decorated it), in the late 6thc BC. The moving image Euphronios created for the krater, depicting the stricken Trojan hero Sarpedon being lifted from the battlefield by 'Sleep' and 'Death', was to have an influence that endured well beyond Antiquity. Nigel Spivey not only explores the particular culture that produced the vase, but also reveals how its central motif was elaborated throughout classical antiquity and then reworked as a Christian tableau. The Sarpedon Krater is both the extraordinary story of a small and occasionally scandalous object, once consigned to the obscurity of an Etruscan tomb, and a fascinating case study of the deep classical roots of the ideas and iconography of Western art.

Nocturne

A Journey in Search of Moonlight
Author: James Attlee
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226030962
Category: History
Page: 309
View: 3434

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A unique travelogue records the author's search for true moonlight throughout the world, seeking places of sanctuary from light pollution in such locales as a Buddhist full-moon ceremony in Japan, a beach in northern France, the Arizona desert and a lunar eclipse atop the snowbound Welsh hills.

Blitz Diary

Life Under Fire in World War II
Author: Carol Harris
Publisher: The History Press
ISBN: 075246275X
Category: History
Page: 192
View: 9178

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Firsthand accounts of the experiences of ordinary people during the Second World War Historian Carol Harris has collected a remarkable series of accounts from the war's darkest days, with heartwarming stories of survival, perseverance, solidarity, and bravery, the preservation of which becomes increasingly important as the Blitz fades from living memory. As World War II loomed, everyone expected it would bring a new kind of conflict to Britain. Raids by airships in World War I and the attack on Guernica in the Spanish Civil War had given a terrifying taste of what was to come, so when war was declared in September 1939, massive air raids against civilians were anticipated. London was a major target throughout the war, but it was not only the capital that suffered: on November 8, 1940, 30,000 incendiary bombs rained down on Coventry, laying waste to the city, including, famously, its cathedral. Port cities such as Plymouth, Bristol, and Liverpool also suffered especially badly. Highlighting the effects of the Blitz outside of London, this anthology of excerpts from letters, memoirs, and diaries tells the story of the bombing as a chronological narrative, until the very end of the war.

The Good Death


Author: Ann Neumann
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807076996
Category: History
Page: 248
View: 1770

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"Following the death of her father, journalist and hospice volunteer Ann Neumann sets out to examine what it means to die well in the United States. If a good death exists, what does it look like? This question lies at the heart of Neumann's rigorously researched and intimately told journey along the ultimate borderland of American life: American death. From church basements to hospital wards to prison cells, Neumann charts the social, political, religious, and medical landscape to explore how we die today. The Good Death weaves personal accounts with a historical exploration of the movements and developments that have changed the ways we experience death. With the diligence of a journalist and the compassion of a caregiver, Neumann provides a portrait of death in the United States that is humane, beautifully written, and essential to our greater understanding of the future of end-of-life care"--

Picasso

An Intimate Portrait
Author: Olivier Widmaier Picasso
Publisher: Tate Publishing & Enterprises
ISBN: 9781849765893
Category: Artists
Page: 320
View: 4315

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This biography paints a riveting portrait of Pablo Picasso (1881-1973), examining both his strengths and shortcomings as husband, lover, and father. Olivier Widmaier Picasso's unique insight into the life of one of the 20th century's most influential artists details not only Picasso's hopes, fears, and regrets, but also his certainties and commitments, his unique audacity, his happiness, and his conflicts. Picasso: An Intimate Portrait is a detailed study of a lifetime dedicated to art, in which the author skillfully captures the real man at the heart of the many fictions and legends that the artist inspired. This masterful text is illustrated with a wealth of drawings, engravings, paintings, and sculptures, as well as many rarely seen and personal photographs by David Douglas Duncan, Edward Quinn, André Villers, Lucien Clergue, Man Ray, Michel Sima, and Robert Capa, among others.

The Masterpiece

A Novel
Author: Fiona Davis
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1524742961
Category: Fiction
Page: 368
View: 9533

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In her latest captivating novel, nationally bestselling author Fiona Davis takes readers into the glamorous lost art school within Grand Central Terminal, where two very different women, fifty years apart, strive to make their mark on a world set against them. For the nearly nine million people who live in New York City, Grand Central Terminal is a crown jewel, a masterpiece of design. But for Clara Darden and Virginia Clay, it represents something quite different. For Clara, the terminal is the stepping stone to her future, which she is certain will shine as the brightly as the constellations on the main concourse ceiling. It is 1928, and twenty-five-year-old Clara is teaching at the lauded Grand Central School of Art. A talented illustrator, she has dreams of creating cover art for Vogue, but not even the prestige of the school can override the public's disdain for a "woman artist." Brash, fiery, confident, and single-minded--even while juggling the affections of two men, a wealthy would-be poet and a brilliant experimental painter--Clara is determined to achieve every creative success. But she and her bohemian friends have no idea that they'll soon be blindsided by the looming Great Depression, an insatiable monster with the power to destroy the entire art scene. And even poverty and hunger will do little to prepare Clara for the greater tragedy yet to come. Nearly fifty years later, in 1974, the terminal has declined almost as sharply as Virginia Clay's life. Full of grime and danger, from the smoke-blackened ceiling to the pickpockets and drug dealers who roam the floor, Grand Central is at the center of a fierce lawsuit: Is the once-grand building a landmark to be preserved, or a cancer to be demolished? For Virginia, it is simply her last resort. Recently divorced, she has just accepted a job in the information booth in order to support herself and her college-age daughter, Ruby. But when Virginia stumbles upon an abandoned art school within the terminal and discovers a striking watercolor hidden under the dust, her eyes are opened to the elegance beneath the decay. She embarks on a quest to find the artist of the unsigned masterpiece--an impassioned chase that draws Virginia not only into the battle to save Grand Central but deep into the mystery of Clara Darden, the famed 1920s illustrator who disappeared from history in 1931.

Isolarion

A Different Oxford Journey
Author: James Attlee
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226030954
Category: Travel
Page: 296
View: 3189

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Through the centuries, people from all walks of life have heard the siren call of a pilgrimage, the lure to journey away from the familiar in search of understanding. But is a pilgrimage even possible these days for city-dwellers enmeshed in the pressures of work and family life? Or is there a way to be a pilgrim without leaving one’s life behind? James Attlee answers these questions with Isolarion, a thoughtful, streetwise, and personal account of his pilgrimage to a place he thought he already knew—the Cowley Road in Oxford, right outside his door. Isolarion takes its title from a type of fifteenth-century map that isolates an area in order to present it in detail, and that’s what Attlee, sharp-eyed and armed with tape recorder and notebook, provides for Cowley Road. The former site of a leper hospital, a workhouse, and a medieval well said to have miraculous healing powers, Cowley Road has little to do with the dreaming spires of the tourist’s or student’s Oxford. What Attlee presents instead is a thoroughly modern, impressively cosmopolitan, and utterly organic collection of shops, restaurants, pubs, and religious establishments teeming with life and reflecting the multicultural makeup of the surrounding neighborhood. From a sojourn in a sensory-deprivation tank to a furtive visit to an unmarked pornography emporium, Attlee investigates every aspect of the Cowley Road’s appealingly eclectic culture, where halal shops jostle with craft jewelers and reggae clubs pulsate alongside quiet churchyards. But the very diversity that is, for Attlee, the essence of Cowley Road’s appeal is under attack from well-meaning city planners and predatory developers. His pilgrimage is thus invested with melancholy: will the messy glories of the Cowley Road be lost to creeping homogenization? Drawing inspiration from sources ranging from Robert Burton’s The Anatomy of Melancholy to contemporary art, Attlee is a charming and companionable guide who revels in the extraordinary embedded in the everyday. Isolarion is at once a road movie, a quixotic stand against uniformity, and a rousing hymn in praise of the complex, invigorating nature of the twenty-first-century city.

Treasures of the Prado


Author: Museo Del Prado,Felipe Vicente Garín Llombart
Publisher: Abbeville Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: Art
Page: 312
View: 1779

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The Director of the Museo del Prado offers a small-scale walking tour highlighting the best of the Prado's magnificent collections of European paintings, sculptures, and objects d'art. 250 full-color illus.

Most Precious Blood


Author: Vince Sgambati
Publisher: Guernica World Editions
ISBN: 9781771833066
Category: Fiction
Page: 278
View: 5429

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Fans of Anne Tyler's quirky characters and her attention to family life, or Pete Hamill's depiction of diverse, ethnic, urban neighborhoods will connect to Most Precious Blood, set in the eleventh-hour of a declining Italian-American neighborhood where complex and often destructive loyalties have dire consequences. Hard Luck Lenny is the quintessential good son, brother, and father, and he fears a calamity will derail his son's future the way his own dreams were derailed years ago, but Frankie is preoccupied with thoughts of Gennaro DiCico, the son of a small-time mobster. Lenny's fears are realized when a cabdriver's son avenges his father's murder.

The Artist and the Warrior

Military History Through the Eyes of the Masters
Author: Theodore K. Rabb
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300177518
Category: ART
Page: 247
View: 6614

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How have artists across the millennia responded to warfare? In this uniquely wide-ranging book, Theodore Rabb blends military history and the history of art to search for the answers. He draws our attention to masterpieces from the ancient world to the twentieth century--paintings, sculpture, ceramics, textiles, engravings, architecture, and photographs--and documents the evolving nature of warfare as artists have perceived it. The selected works represent landmarks in the history of art and are drawn mainly from the western tradition, though important examples from Japan, India, and the Middle East are also brought into the discussion. Together these works tell a story of long centuries during which warfare inspired admiration and celebration. Yet a shift toward criticism and condemnation emerged in the Renaissance, and by the end of the nineteenth century, glorification of the warrior by leading artists had ceased. Rabb traces this progression, from such works as the Column of Trajan and the Titian "Battle of Lepanto," whose makers celebrated glorious victories, to the antiwar depictions created by Brueghel, Goya, Picasso, and others. Richly illustrated and accessibly written, this book presents a study of unprecedented sweep and multidisciplinary interest.

Closing the Book

Travels in Life, Loss, and Literature
Author: Joelle Renstrom
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781938349249
Category:
Page: 225
View: 4529

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Literary Nonfiction. Essays. Memoir. CLOSING THE BOOK: TRAVELS IN LIFE, LOSS, AND LITERATURE explores the intersection of literature and life in personal essays about traveling, teaching, reading, writing, living, and dying. Each essay's narrative arc is formed and informed by the act of reading literature that makes a reader feel like the book she's reading was somehow written specifically for her to read in that exact moment. Renstrom relies on science fiction as a catalyst for grief, as well as a means of pushing past grim realities to begin envisioning life reconstructed and to embrace the idea that "there's nothing wrong with rebuilding forever."

The Visual Arts: A History


Author: Hugh Honour,John Fleming
Publisher: Laurence King Publishing
ISBN: 9781780671178
Category: Art
Page: 996
View: 2925

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For over a quarter of a century this art historical tour de force has consistently proved the classic introduction to humandkind's artistic heritage. From our Paleolithic past to our digitised present, every continent and culture is covered in an articulate and well-balanced discussion--a broad and epic canvas that omits none of the fine detail. In this Revised Seventh Edition, contemporary art historian Michael Archer has brought the account of contemporary art up to date, reflecting the latest developments that continue to shape out cultural history.

The Spanish Civil War: A Very Short Introduction


Author: Helen Graham
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780192803771
Category: History
Page: 175
View: 545

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This Very Short Introduction offers a powerfully-written explanation of the Spanish Civil war's complex origins and course, and explores its impact on a personal and international scale. It examines Spanish participation in European resistance movements during World War II and also the ongoing civil war waged politically, economically, judicially and culturally inside Spain by Francoism after its military victory in 1939. During this time, history writing itself became a battleground, and the book charts the Franco regime's attempt to appropriate the past. Graham has provided an ethical reflection on the war in the context of Europe's tumultuous twentieth century, highlighting why it has inspired some of the greatest writers of our time, and how the effects of this regime continue to resonate today in Britain, continental Europe, and beyond.

Picasso and Truth

From Cubism to Guernica
Author: T. J. Clark
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691157413
Category: Art
Page: 329
View: 9639

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"Picasso and Truth" offers a breathtaking and original new look at the most significant artist of the modern era. From Pablo Picasso's early "The Blue Room" to the later "Guernica", eminent art historian T. J. Clark offers a striking reassessment of the artist's paintings from the 1920s and 1930s. Why was the space of a room so basic to Picasso's worldview? And what happened to his art when he began to feel that room-space become too confined--too little exposed to the catastrophes of the twentieth century? Clark explores the role of space and the interior, and the battle between intimacy and monstrosity, in Picasso's art. Based on the A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts delivered at the National Gallery of Art, this lavishly illustrated volume remedies the biographical and idolatrous tendencies of most studies on Picasso, reasserting the structure and substance of the artist's work. With compelling insight, Clark focuses on three central works--the large-scale "Guitar and Mandolin on a Table" (1924), "The Three Dancers" (1925), and "The Painter and His Model" (1927)--and explores Picasso's answer to Nietzsche's belief that the age-old commitment to truth was imploding in modern European culture. Masterful in its historical contextualization, "Picasso and Truth" rescues Picasso from the celebrity culture that trivializes his accomplishments and returns us to the tragic vision of his art--humane and appalling, naive and difficult, in mourning for a lost nineteenth century, yet utterly exposed to the hell of Europe between the wars.

Her Mother's Lover


Author: Rachelle Chaykin,Tracy Kuhn Greenlee
Publisher: Krbveritas Publishing
ISBN: 9780989154116
Category: American fiction
Page: 522
View: 9270

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Three women are searching for their futures-in contemporary Philadelphia, Stella Simone is facing the absence of her daughter and husband, while history Professor Eve Newcastle faces an uncertain future as retirement looms. In 1928 Paris, Madalane Durand is a young student who has successfully fought her family for the right to attend university there on her own. These three women find their past and future connections to each other in letters written by an enigmatic artist named Evienne Lavelle. Madalane's journey begins when Paris was the center of the cultural world; Picasso changed the World's Fair with Guernica, and Gertrude Stein was the literary and artistic king maker. As the 1930s come to a close and the specter of war overshadows the world, Madalane and the rest of Paris desperately try to hold on to their lives as their city is targeted by the Nazis. Cleaning out a dead woman's house, Stella discovers a cache of letters. With the help of Madalane's daughter, Eve, they try to understand what happened to Madalane in Paris. Their search reveals a life inside of a lie and, as painful memories and deceptions surface, both women are changed as they learn the truth about Madalane's life.

A Boy at the Edge of the World


Author: David Kingston Yeh
Publisher: Essential Prose
ISBN: 9781771832489
Category: Fiction
Page: 280
View: 956

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Meet the Garneau boys, triplets from small-town Ontario. Daniel the "eldest" is gay, and moves to Toronto with his best friend Karen to attend university. Eventually, he meets David, a bike mechanic whose Catholic Italian mother talks to her dead husbands. Their chemistry is immediate, but Daniel is still drawn to his ex-boyfriend Marcus, a performance artist whose grandfather was a book-burning Nazi. A Boy at the Edge of the World is a rollicking dramedy that explores the compulsive and (ultimately) universal human pursuit of intimacy, sex, and love.

The Best Lover


Author: Laura Boss
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781630450441
Category: Poetry
Page: 80
View: 9891

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Poetry. Women's Studies. Jewish Studies. Laura Boss' newest collection THE BEST LOVER continues the author's signature style of audacious, irreverent, ironic narrative poems that somehow often fuse heartbreak, humor and intensity in unflinchingly honest poems that explore relationships: both family relationships and lovers, including living with the "L'Enfant Terrible" Beat poet that Allen Ginsberg called the best poet of the last quarter of the 20th Century. This book examines the grief that follows a long term relationship, 9/11, internet dating, the randomness of fate and the way choices made or not made affect the course of our lives. Baudelaire said, "the worst sin of poetry is to be boring." Laura Boss' poems are never boring. Ultimately, the book transcends its author's journey and becomes an adventure of survival with which each reader can identify.