Gender, Race, and Politics in the Midwest

Black Club Women in Illinois
Author: Wanda A. Hendricks
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253334473
Category: Social Science
Page: 162
View: 3757

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Examines the structures and ideologies of Illinois black club women, looks at the activities of some rural and urban clubs, and describes individual women's work in the areas of child and health care, establishing settlement houses, and suffrage efforts.

Knock at the Door of Opportunity

Black Migration to Chicago, 1900-1919
Author: Christopher Robert Reed
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 0809333333
Category: History
Page: 390
View: 346

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Disputing the so-called ghetto studies that depicted the early part of the twentieth century as the nadir of African American society, this thoughtful volume by Christopher Robert Reed investigates black life in turn-of-the-century Chicago, revealing a vibrant community that grew and developed on Chicago’s South Side in the early 1900s. Reed also explores the impact of the fifty thousand black southerners who streamed into the city during the Great Migration of 1916–1918, effectively doubling Chicago’s African American population. Those already residing in Chicago’s black neighborhoods had a lot in common with those who migrated, Reed demonstrates, and the two groups became unified, building a broad community base able to face discrimination and prejudice while contributing to Chicago’s growth and development. Reed not only explains how Chicago’s African Americans openly competed with white people for jobs, housing and an independent political voice but also examines the structure of the society migrants entered and helped shape. Other topics include South Side housing, black politics and protest, the role of institutionalized religion, the economic aspects of African American life, the push for citizenship rights and political power for African Americans, and the impact of World War I and the race riot of 1919. The first comprehensive exploration of black life in turn-of-the-century Chicago beyond the mold of a ghetto perspective, this revealing work demonstrates how the melding of migrants and residents allowed for the building of a Black Metropolis in the 1920s. 2015 ISHS Superior Achievement Award

Women’s Rights, Racial Integration, and Education from 1850–1920

The Case of Sarah Raymond, the First Female Superintendent
Author: M. Noraian
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230101445
Category: Education
Page: 189
View: 5744

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This historical biography examines Sarah Raymond Fitzwilliam's abolitionist roots growing up on a stop of the Underground Railroad, her training at a 'normal school,' her tenure as a teacher, principal and the nation's first city school superintendent (Bloomington, Illinois 1874-1892).

Remaking Respectability

African American Women in Interwar Detroit
Author: Victoria W. Wolcott
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469611007
Category: Social Science
Page: 360
View: 7574

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In the early decades of the twentieth century, tens of thousands of African Americans arrived at Detroit's Michigan Central Station, part of the Great Migration of blacks who left the South seeking improved economic and political conditions in the urban North. The most visible of these migrants have been the male industrial workers who labored on the city's automobile assembly lines. African American women have largely been absent from traditional narratives of the Great Migration because they were excluded from industrial work. By placing these women at the center of her study, Victoria Wolcott reveals their vital role in shaping life in interwar Detroit. Wolcott takes us into the speakeasies, settlement houses, blues clubs, storefront churches, employment bureaus, and training centers of Prohibition- and depression-era Detroit. There, she explores the wide range of black women's experiences, focusing particularly on the interactions between working- and middle-class women. As Detroit's black population grew exponentially, women not only served as models of bourgeois respectability, but also began to reshape traditional standards of deportment in response to the new realities of their lives. In so doing, Wolcott says, they helped transform black politics and culture. Eventually, as the depression arrived, female respectability as a central symbol of reform was supplanted by a more strident working-class activism.

Fannie Barrier Williams

Crossing the Borders of Region and Race
Author: Wanda A. Hendricks
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252095871
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 288
View: 9057

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Born shortly before the Civil War, activist and reformer Fannie Barrier Williams (1855-1944) became one of the most prominent educated African American women of her generation. Hendricks shows how Williams became "raced" for the first time in early adulthood, when she became a teacher in Missouri and Washington, D.C., and faced the injustices of racism and the stark contrast between the lives of freed slaves and her own privileged upbringing in a western New York village. She carried this new awareness to Chicago, where she joined forces with black and predominantly white women's clubs, the Unitarian church, and various other interracial social justice organizations to become a prominent spokesperson for Progressive economic, racial, and gender reforms during the transformative period of industrialization. By highlighting how Williams experienced a set of freedoms in the North that were not imaginable in the South, this clearly-written, widely accessible biography expands how we understand intellectual possibilities, economic success, and social mobility in post-Reconstruction America.

Transnational Latina Narratives in the Twenty-first Century

The Politics of Gender, Race, and Migrations
Author: Juanita Heredia
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230623255
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 176
View: 8530

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Transnational Latina Narratives is the first critical study of its kind to examine twenty-first-century Latina narratives by female authors of diverse Latin American heritages based in the U.S. Heredia s comparative perspective on gender, race and migrations between Latin America and the U.S. demonstrates the changing national landscape that needs to accommodate an ever-growing Latino/a presence. This book draws on the work of Denise Chávez, Sandra Cisneros, Marta Moreno Vega, Angie Cruz, and Marie Arana, as well as a diverse blend of popular culture. Heredia s thought-provoking insights seek to empower the representation of women who are transnational ambassadors in modern trans-American literature.

The Latino Gender Gap in U.S. Politics


Author: Christina E. Bejarano
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135010609
Category: Political Science
Page: 178
View: 434

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Many questions remain unanswered about the observable differences in voting behavior, partisanship, and cultural attitudes among men and women. Latino political participation in the United States is generally lower than the rest of the population, mainly due to their high proportion of youth and foreign born populations that are ineligible to vote. This dynamic is slowing changing, partly as a result of the rapidly growing Latino population in the United States. This book delves deeper into the complex gender differences for Latino political behavior. More specifically, it is a political analysis of the diverse U.S. Latino population and the interacting factors that can influence male and female differences in voting and policy attitudes. Christina E. Bejarano carefully unpacks more aspects of the gender category for Latinos, including analyzing the gender differences in Latino political behavior across national origin, foreign born status, and generational status. The Latino gender gap can have far-reaching political implications on electoral politics. As the Latino population highlights their growing political sway, the major political parties have and will strategically mobilize and court the Latino electorate, Latinas in particular.

Emancipation's Diaspora

Race and Reconstruction in the Upper Midwest
Author: Leslie A. Schwalm
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807894125
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 7750

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Most studies of emancipation's consequences have focused on the South. Moving the discussion to the North, Leslie Schwalm enriches our understanding of the national impact of the transition from slavery to freedom. Emancipation's Diaspora follows the lives and experiences of thousands of men and women who liberated themselves from slavery, made their way to overwhelmingly white communities in Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, and worked to live in dignity as free women and men and as citizens. Schwalm explores the hotly contested politics of black enfranchisement as well as collisions over segregation, civil rights, and the more informal politics of race--including how slavery and emancipation would be remembered and commemorated. She examines how gender shaped the politics of race, and how gender relations were contested and negotiated within the black community. Based on extensive archival research, Emancipation's Diaspora shows how in churches and schools, in voting booths and Masonic temples, in bustling cities and rural crossroads, black and white Midwesterners--women and men--shaped the local and national consequences of emancipation.

Race, Gender, and Class in the Tea Party

What the Movement Reflects about Mainstream Ideologies
Author: Meghan A. Burke
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739185543
Category: Social Science
Page: 140
View: 5542

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This book makes use of ethnographic data to enrich our understanding of the Tea Party, particularly what it was that drew people to the movement. It argues that, far from radical, the Tea Party reflects the broader realities around race, gender, and class that permeate our social and political system.

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Volume 13: Gender
Author: Nancy Bercaw,Ted Ownby
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469616726
Category: Reference
Page: 408
View: 5773

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This volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture reflects the dramatic increase in research on the topic of gender over the past thirty years, revealing that even the most familiar subjects take on new significance when viewed through the lens of gender. The wide range of entries explores how people have experienced, understood, and used concepts of womanhood and manhood in all sorts of obvious and subtle ways. The volume features 113 articles, 65 of which are entirely new for this edition. Thematic articles address subjects such as sexuality, respectability, and paternalism and investigate the role of gender in broader subjects, including the civil rights movement, country music, and sports. Topical entries highlight individuals such as Oprah Winfrey, the Grimke sisters, and Dale Earnhardt, as well as historical events such as the capture of Jefferson Davis in a woman's dress, the Supreme Court's decision in Loving v. Virginia, and the Memphis sanitation workers' strike, with its slogan, "I AM A MAN." Bringing together scholarship on gender and the body, sexuality, labor, race, and politics, this volume offers new ways to view big questions in southern history and culture.

Politics and Religion in the White South


Author: Glenn Feldman
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813137225
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 7164

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Politics, while always an integral part of the daily life in the South, took on a new level of importance after the Civil War. Today, political strategists view the South as an essential region to cultivate if political hopefuls are to have a chance of winning elections at the national level. Although operating within the context of a secular government, American politics is decidedly marked by a Christian influence. In the mostly Protestant South, religion and politics have long been nearly inextricable. Politics and Religion in the White South skillfully examines the powerful role that religious considerations and influence have played in American political discourse. This collection of thirteen essays from prominent historians and political scientists explores the intersection in the South of religion, politics, race relations, and southern culture from post--Civil War America to the present, when the Religious Right has exercised a profound impact on the course of politics in the region as well as the nation. The authors examine issues such as religious attitudes about race on the Jim Crow South; Billy Graham's influence on the civil rights movement; political activism and the Southern Baptist Convention; and Dorothy Tilly, a white Methodist woman, and her contributions as a civil rights reformer during the 1940s and 1950s. The volume also considers the issue of whether southerners felt it was their sacred duty to prevent American society from moving away from its Christian origins toward a new, secular identity and how this perceived God-given responsibility was reflected in the work of southern political and church leaders. By analyzing the vital relationship between religion and politics in the region where their connection is strongest and most evident, Politics and Religion in the White South offers insight into the conservatism of the South and the role that religion has played in maintaining its social and cultural traditionalism.

No Saloon in the Valley

The Southern Strategy of Texas Prohibitionists in the 1880s
Author: James D. Ivy
Publisher: Baylor University Press
ISBN: 0918954878
Category: History
Page: 150
View: 3835

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In this engaging study, James D. Ivy recovers an intriguing and neglected aspect of Texas cultural history--the confluence of social strategies that fueled the Texas prohibition movement. In particular, Ivy contends that Texas prohibitionists developed a southern strategy that characterized prohibition as a reform movement with southern roots in Texas soil. These prohibitionists overtly distanced themselves from northern evangelical reformers that had championed abolition, religious radicalism, or feminism in order to appeal to male voters anxious about their role in post-Reconstruction southern society. While their strategy succeeded insofar as it was able to gain the support of a majority of white males with close ties to the former Confederacy, it failed to persuade a majority of Texas voters to embrace prohibition.

Encyclopedia of Race, Ethnicity, and Society


Author: Richard T. Schaefer
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1452265860
Category: Social Science
Page: 1752
View: 6625

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"This ambitious undertaking touches all bases, is highly accessible, and provides a solid starting point for further exploration." —School Library Journal This three-volume reference presents a comprehensive look at the role race and ethnicity play in society and in our daily lives.. The Encyclopedia of Race, Ethnicity, and Society offers informative coverage of intergroup relations in the United States and the comparative examination of race and ethnicity worldwide. Containing nearly 600 entries, this resource provides a foundation to understanding as well as researching racial and ethnic diversity from a multidisciplinary perspective. Key Features Describes over a hundred racial and ethnic groups, with additional thematic essays discussing broad topics that cut across group boundaries and impact society at large Addresses other issues of inequality that often intersect with the primary focus on race and ethnicity, such as ability, age, class, gender, and sexual orientation Brings together the most distinguished authorities possible, with 375 contributors from 14 different countries Offers broad historical coverage,, ranging from "Kennewick Man" to the "Emancipation Proclamation" to "Hip-Hop" Presents over 90 maps to help the reader comprehend the source of nationalities or the distribution of ethnic or racial groups Provides an easy-to-use statistical appendix with the latest data and carefully selected historical comparisons Key Themes · Biographies · Community and Urban Issues · Concepts and Theories · Criminal Justice · Economics and Stratification · Education · Gender and Family · Global Perspectives · Health and Social Welfare · Immigration and Citizenship · Legislation, Court Decisions, and Treaties · Media, Sports, and Entertainment · Organizations · Prejudice and Discrimination · Public Policy · Racial, Ethnic, and Nationality Groups · Religion · Sociopolitical Movements and Conflicts

Gender Consciousness and Politics


Author: Sue Tolleson Rinehart
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317960831
Category: Social Science
Page: 216
View: 8649

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This book examines the emergence of gender consciousness among women as a significant force in American politics. The author bases her argument on an in-depth empirical analysis of data derived from the U.S. biennial National Election studies of 1974 to 1984, the year of the emergence of the so-called gender gap. The author discusses the fact that while feminism is central to womens' political orientation, the simple awareness of gender differences and group consciousness is a powerful force of change.

Feminist Frontiers

Women Who Shaped the Midwest
Author: Yvonne Johnson
Publisher: Truman State Univ Press
ISBN: 1935503774
Category: History
Page: 232
View: 2005

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Women's stories are noticeably absent from the master narrative of the Populist and Progressive movements, where their struggle for civil rights was more evident in the Midwest than any other region in the country. This collection of eleven biographical essays highlights women leaders in the Midwest who challenged gender, racial, class, and ethnic boundaries in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Not only were these midwestern women powerful orators and active leaders, they were influential in shaping the culture in their communities.

Health in the City

Race, Poverty, and the Negotiation of Women’s Health in New York City, 1915–1930
Author: Tanya Hart
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479873063
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 1207

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Shortly after the dawn of the twentieth century, the New York City Department of Health decided to address what it perceived as the racial nature of health. It delivered heavily racialized care in different neighborhoods throughout the city: syphillis treatment among African Americans, tuberculosis for Italian Americans, and so on. It was a challenging and ambitious program, dangerous for the providers, and troublingly reductive for the patients. Nevertheless, poor and working-class African American, British West Indian, and Southern Italian women all received some of the nation’s best health care during this period. Health in the City challenges traditional ideas of early twentieth-century urban black health care by showing a program that was simultaneously racialized and cutting-edge. It reveals that even the most well-meaning public health programs may inadvertently reinforce perceptions of inferiority that they were created to fix.

Race, Ethnicity, and Gender

Selected Readings
Author: Joseph F. Healey,Eileen O'Brien
Publisher: Pine Forge Press
ISBN: 1412941075
Category: Social Science
Page: 477
View: 4217

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This book of readings is designed to be both a stand alone reader as well as a companion title to Healey′s Diversity and Society, Second Edition. The book is a unique mix of first-person accounts, competing views on various issues, and it includes articles from the research literature. The Narrative Portraits and most of the Current Debates articles are from Healey′s Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Class, Fourth Edition. It will provide orientation on the issues which many instructors utilize when teaching the race and ethnicity course.

The Politics of Curricular Change

Race, Hegemony, and Power in Education
Author: M. Christopher Brown,Roderic R. Land
Publisher: Peter Lang
ISBN: 9780820448633
Category: Education
Page: 254
View: 6131

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The Politics of Curricular Change fills an important void in the literature regarding the relationship of multicultural curricular change to race, hegemony, and power as independent constructs. Given the scant corpus of research on how these constructs s

Heartland TV

Prime Time Television and the Struggle for U.S. Identity
Author: Victoria E. Johnson
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814742921
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 262
View: 1595

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Winner of the 2009 Society for Cinema and Media Studies Katherine Singer Kovacs Book Award The Midwest of popular imagination is a "Heartland" characterized by traditional cultural values and mass market dispositions. Whether cast positively —; as authentic, pastoral, populist, hardworking, and all-American—or negatively—as backward, narrow–minded, unsophisticated, conservative, and out-of-touch—the myth of the Heartland endures. Heartland TV examines the centrality of this myth to television's promotion and development, programming and marketing appeals, and public debates over the medium's and its audience's cultural worth. Victoria E. Johnson investigates how the "square" image of the heartland has been ritually recuperated on prime time television, from The Lawrence Welk Show in the 1950s, to documentary specials in the 1960s, to The Mary Tyler Moore Show in the 1970s, to Ellen in the 1990s. She also examines news specials on the Oklahoma City bombing to reveal how that city has been inscribed as the epitome of a timeless, pastoral heartland, and concludes with an analysis of network branding practices and appeals to an imagined "red state" audience. Johnson argues that non-white, queer, and urban culture is consistently erased from depictions of the Midwest in order to reinforce its "reassuring" image as white and straight. Through analyses of policy, industry discourse, and case studies of specific shows, Heartland TV exposes the cultural function of the Midwest as a site of national transference and disavowal with regard to race, sexuality, and citizenship ideals.

Losing the Center

The Decline of American Liberalism, 1968--1992
Author: Jeffrey Bloodworth
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 081314230X
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 5206

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Many Americans consider John F. Kennedy's presidency to represent the apex of American liberalism. Kennedy's "Vital Center" blueprint united middle-class and working-class Democrats and promoted freedom abroad while recognizing the limits of American power. Liberalism thrived in the early 1960s, but its heyday was short-lived. In L osing the Center, Jeffrey Bloodworth demonstrates how and why the once-dominant ideology began its steep decline, exploring its failures through the biographies of some of the Democratic Party's most important leaders, including Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Henry "Scoop" Jackson, Bella Abzug, Harold Ford Sr., and Jimmy Carter. By illuminating historical events through the stories of the people at the center of the action, Bloodworth sheds new light on topics such as feminism, the environment, the liberal abandonment of the working class, and civil rights legislation. This meticulously researched study authoritatively argues that liberalism's demise was prompted not by a "Republican revolution" or the mistakes of a few prominent politicians, but instead by decades of ideological incoherence and political ineptitude among liberals. Bloodworth demonstrates that Democrats caused their own party's decline by failing to realize that their policies contradicted the priorities of mainstream voters, who were more concerned about social issues than economic ones. With its unique biographical approach and masterful use of archival materials, this detailed and accessible book promises to stand as one of the definitive texts on the state of American liberalism in the second half of the twentieth century.