Gender, Race, and Politics in the Midwest

Black Club Women in Illinois
Author: Wanda A. Hendricks
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253334473
Category: Social Science
Page: 162
View: 3532

Continue Reading →

Examines the structures and ideologies of Illinois black club women, looks at the activities of some rural and urban clubs, and describes individual women's work in the areas of child and health care, establishing settlement houses, and suffrage efforts.

Emancipation's Diaspora

Race and Reconstruction in the Upper Midwest
Author: Leslie A. Schwalm
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807894125
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 1778

Continue Reading →

Most studies of emancipation's consequences have focused on the South. Moving the discussion to the North, Leslie Schwalm enriches our understanding of the national impact of the transition from slavery to freedom. Emancipation's Diaspora follows the lives and experiences of thousands of men and women who liberated themselves from slavery, made their way to overwhelmingly white communities in Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, and worked to live in dignity as free women and men and as citizens. Schwalm explores the hotly contested politics of black enfranchisement as well as collisions over segregation, civil rights, and the more informal politics of race--including how slavery and emancipation would be remembered and commemorated. She examines how gender shaped the politics of race, and how gender relations were contested and negotiated within the black community. Based on extensive archival research, Emancipation's Diaspora shows how in churches and schools, in voting booths and Masonic temples, in bustling cities and rural crossroads, black and white Midwesterners--women and men--shaped the local and national consequences of emancipation.

For the Freedom of Her Race

Black Women and Electoral Politics in Illinois, 1877-1932
Author: Lisa G. Materson
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807894033
Category: Social Science
Page: 360
View: 5751

Continue Reading →

Grounded in the rich history of Chicago politics, For the Freedom of Her Race tells a wide-ranging story about black women's involvement in southern, midwestern, and national politics. Examining the oppressive decades between the end of Reconstruction in 1877 and the election of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1932--a period that is often described as the nadir of black life in America--Lisa Materson shows that as African American women migrated beyond the reach of southern white supremacists, they became active voters, canvassers, suffragists, campaigners, and lobbyists, mobilizing to gain a voice in national party politics and elect representatives who would push for the enforcement of the Reconstruction Amendments in the South.

Fannie Barrier Williams

Crossing the Borders of Region and Race
Author: Wanda A. Hendricks
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252095871
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 288
View: 511

Continue Reading →

Born shortly before the Civil War, activist and reformer Fannie Barrier Williams (1855-1944) became one of the most prominent educated African American women of her generation. Hendricks shows how Williams became "raced" for the first time in early adulthood, when she became a teacher in Missouri and Washington, D.C., and faced the injustices of racism and the stark contrast between the lives of freed slaves and her own privileged upbringing in a western New York village. She carried this new awareness to Chicago, where she joined forces with black and predominantly white women's clubs, the Unitarian church, and various other interracial social justice organizations to become a prominent spokesperson for Progressive economic, racial, and gender reforms during the transformative period of industrialization. By highlighting how Williams experienced a set of freedoms in the North that were not imaginable in the South, this clearly-written, widely accessible biography expands how we understand intellectual possibilities, economic success, and social mobility in post-Reconstruction America.

Latino Heartland

Of Borders and Belonging in the Midwest
Author: Sujey Vega
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479864536
Category: Social Science
Page: 304
View: 7673

Continue Reading →

National immigration debates have thrust both opponents of immigration and immigrant rights supporters into the news. But what happens once the rallies end and the banners come down? What is daily life like for Latinos who have been presented nationally as “terrorists, drug smugglers, alien gangs, and violent criminals”? Latino Heartland offers an ethnography of the Latino and non-Latino residents of a small Indiana town, showing how national debate pitted neighbor against neighbor—and the strategies some used to combat such animosity. It conveys the lived impact of divisive political rhetoric on immigration and how race, gender, class, and ethnicity inform community belonging in the twenty-first century. Latino Heartland illuminates how community membership was determined yet simultaneously re-made by those struggling to widen the scope of who was imagined as a legitimate resident citizen of this Midwestern space. The volume draws on interviews with Latinos—both new immigrants and long-standing U.S. citizens—and whites, as well as African Americans, to provide a sense of the racial dynamics in play as immigrants asserted their right to belong to the community. Latino Hoosiers asserted a right to redefine what belonging meant within their homes, at their spaces of worship, and in the public eye. Through daily acts of ethnic belonging, Spanish-speaking residents navigated their own sense of community that did not require that they abandon their difference just to be accepted. In Latino Heartland, Sujey Vega addresses the politics of immigration, showing us how increasingly diverse towns can work toward embracing their complexity.

Cutting Into the Meatpacking Line

Workers and Change in the Rural Midwest
Author: Deborah Fink
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807861405
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 8262

Continue Reading →

The nostalgic vision of a rural Midwest populated by independent family farmers hides the reality that rural wage labor has been integral to the region's development, says Deborah Fink. Focusing on the porkpacking industry in Iowa, Fink investigates the experience of the rural working class and highlights its significance in shaping the state's economic, political, and social contours. Fink draws both on interviews and on her own firsthand experience working on the production floor of a pork-processing plant. She weaves a fascinating account of the meatpacking industry's history in Iowa--a history, she notes, that has been experienced differently by male and female, immigrant and native-born, white and black workers. Indeed, argues Fink, these differences are a key factor in the ongoing creation of the rural working class. Other writers have denounced the new meatpacking companies for their ruthless destruction of both workers and communities. Fink sustains this criticism, which she augments with a discussion of union action, but also goes beyond it. She looks within rural midwestern culture itself to examine the class, gender, and ethnic contradictions that allowed--indeed welcomed--the meatpacking industry's development.

Vulnerability Politics

The Uses and Abuses of Precarity in Political Debate
Author: Katie Oliviero
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479847828
Category: Political Science
Page: 336
View: 3969

Continue Reading →

"Katie Oliviero's "Vulnerability Politics: The Uses and Abuses of Precarity in Political Debate" explores the concept of politically vulnerable and unprotected groups in the 21st century. The book addresses such important issues as women's reproductive rights, immigration and marriage equality" --

The Politics of Resentment

Rural Consciousness in Wisconsin and the Rise of Scott Walker
Author: Katherine J. Cramer
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022634925X
Category: Political Science
Page: 256
View: 3253

Continue Reading →

Since the election of Scott Walker, Wisconsin has been seen as ground zero for debates about the appropriate role of government in the wake of the Great Recession. In a time of rising inequality, Walker not only survived a bitterly contested recall that brought thousands of protesters to Capitol Square, he was subsequently reelected. How could this happen? How is it that the very people who stand to benefit from strong government services not only vote against the candidates who support those services but are vehemently against the very idea of big government? With The Politics of Resentment, Katherine J. Cramer uncovers an oft-overlooked piece of the puzzle: rural political consciousness and the resentment of the “liberal elite.” Rural voters are distrustful that politicians will respect the distinct values of their communities and allocate a fair share of resources. What can look like disagreements about basic political principles are therefore actually rooted in something even more fundamental: who we are as people and how closely a candidate’s social identity matches our own. Using Scott Walker and Wisconsin’s prominent and protracted debate about the appropriate role of government, Cramer illuminates the contours of rural consciousness, showing how place-based identities profoundly influence how people understand politics, regardless of whether urban politicians and their supporters really do shortchange or look down on those living in the country. The Politics of Resentment shows that rural resentment—no less than partisanship, race, or class—plays a major role in dividing America against itself.

Manliness and Civilization

A Cultural History of Gender and Race in the United States, 1880-1917
Author: Gail Bederman
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226041490
Category: Social Science
Page: 322
View: 1994

Continue Reading →

When former heavyweight champion Jim Jeffries came out of retirement on the fourth of July, 1910 to fight current black heavywight champion Jack Johnson in Reno, Nevada, he boasted that he was doing it "for the sole purpose of proving that a white man is better than a negro." Jeffries, though, was trounced. Whites everywhere rioted. The furor, Gail Bederman demonstrates, was part of two fundamental and volatile national obsessions: manhood and racial dominance. In turn-of-the-century America, cultural ideals of manhood changed profoundly, as Victorian notions of self-restrained, moral manliness were challenged by ideals of an aggressive, overtly sexualized masculinity. Bederman traces this shift in values and shows how it brought together two seemingly contradictory ideals: the unfettered virility of racially "primitive" men and the refined superiority of "civilized" white men. Focusing on the lives and works of four very different Americans—Theodore Roosevelt, educator G. Stanley Hall, Ida B. Wells, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman—she illuminates the ideological, cultural, and social interests these ideals came to serve.

With Other Eyes

Looking at Race and Gender in Visual Culture
Author: Lisa Bloom
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 9780816632237
Category: Social Science
Page: 268
View: 2920

Continue Reading →

With Other Eyes demonstrates how feminist, postcolonial, and antiracist concerns can successfully be incorporated into the study of art.

Queering the Middle

Race, Region, and a Queer Midwest
Author: Martin Manalansan,Richard T. Rodriguez,Chantal Nadeau,Siobhan B. Somerville
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780822368076
Category: Social Science
Page: 228
View: 2583

Continue Reading →

When imagined in relation to other regions of the United States, the Midwest is often positioned as the norm, the uncontested site of white American middle-class heteronormativity. This characterization has often prevailed in scholarship on sexual identity, practice, and culture, but a growing body of recent queer work on rural sexualities, transnational migration, regional identities, and working-class culture suggests the need to understand the Midwest otherwise. This special issue offers an opportunity to think with, through, and against the idea of region. Rather than reinforce the idea of the Midwest as a core that naturalizes American cultural and ideological formations, these essays instead open up possibilities for unraveling the idea of the heartland. The introduction provides a discussion of the theoretical and critical motivations for understanding the middle as a queer vantage, while the six articles focus on social movements, queer community networks, Midwest-based expressive cultures, and local and diasporic rearticulations of racial, gender, and sexual politics. At the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Martin Manalansanis Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, Chantal Nadeau is Professor and Chair of Gender and Women's Studies, and Richard T. Rodríguez and Siobhan B. Somerville are Associate Professors in the Department of English.

Women’s Rights, Racial Integration, and Education from 1850–1920

The Case of Sarah Raymond, the First Female Superintendent
Author: M. Noraian
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230101445
Category: Education
Page: 189
View: 6862

Continue Reading →

This historical biography examines Sarah Raymond Fitzwilliam's abolitionist roots growing up on a stop of the Underground Railroad, her training at a 'normal school,' her tenure as a teacher, principal and the nation's first city school superintendent (Bloomington, Illinois 1874-1892).

Remaking Respectability

African American Women in Interwar Detroit
Author: Victoria W. Wolcott
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469611007
Category: Social Science
Page: 360
View: 1508

Continue Reading →

In the early decades of the twentieth century, tens of thousands of African Americans arrived at Detroit's Michigan Central Station, part of the Great Migration of blacks who left the South seeking improved economic and political conditions in the urban North. The most visible of these migrants have been the male industrial workers who labored on the city's automobile assembly lines. African American women have largely been absent from traditional narratives of the Great Migration because they were excluded from industrial work. By placing these women at the center of her study, Victoria Wolcott reveals their vital role in shaping life in interwar Detroit. Wolcott takes us into the speakeasies, settlement houses, blues clubs, storefront churches, employment bureaus, and training centers of Prohibition- and depression-era Detroit. There, she explores the wide range of black women's experiences, focusing particularly on the interactions between working- and middle-class women. As Detroit's black population grew exponentially, women not only served as models of bourgeois respectability, but also began to reshape traditional standards of deportment in response to the new realities of their lives. In so doing, Wolcott says, they helped transform black politics and culture. Eventually, as the depression arrived, female respectability as a central symbol of reform was supplanted by a more strident working-class activism.

Social stratification

class, race, and gender in sociological perspective
Author: David B. Grusky
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780813310657
Category: Social Science
Page: 750
View: 4548

Continue Reading →

"The field of stratification is being transformed and reshaped by advances in theory and quantitative modeling as well as by new approaches to the analysis of economic, racial, and gender inequality. A"

Yearning

Race, Gender, and Cultural Politics
Author: bell hooks
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317588150
Category: Social Science
Page: 250
View: 5747

Continue Reading →

For bell hooks, the best cultural criticism sees no need to separate politics from the pleasure of reading. Yearning collects together some of hooks's classic and early pieces of cultural criticism from the '80s. Addressing topics like pedagogy, postmodernism, and politics, hooks examines a variety of cultural artifacts, from Spike Lee's film Do the Right Thing and Wim Wenders's film Wings of Desire to the writings of Zora Neale Hurston and Toni Morrison. The result is a poignant collection of essays which, like all of hooks's work, is above all else concerned with transforming oppressive structures of domination.

Black women in white

racial conflict and cooperation in the nursing profession, 1890-1950
Author: Darlene Clark Hine
Publisher: Indiana Univ Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: Medical
Page: 264
View: 9948

Continue Reading →

“Work or Fight!”

Race, Gender, and the Draft in World War One
Author: G. Shenk
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1403980845
Category: Social Science
Page: 194
View: 320

Continue Reading →

During World War I the U.S. demanded that all able-bodied men work or fight. White men who were husbands and fathers, owned property or worked at approved jobs had the benefits of citizenship without fighting. Others were often barred from achieving these benefits. This book tells the stories of those affected by the Selective Service System.

Latinos in the Midwest


Author: Rubén O. Martinez
Publisher: MSU Press
ISBN: 1609172132
Category: Social Science
Page: 450
View: 9069

Continue Reading →

Over the past twenty years, the Latino population in the Midwest has grown rapidly, both in urban and rural areas. As elsewhere in the country, shifting demographics in the region have given rise to controversy and mixed reception. Where some communities have greeted Latinos openly, others have been more guarded. In spite of their increasing presence, Latinos remain the most marginalized major population group in the country. In coming years, the projected growth of this population will require greater attention from policymakers concerned with helping to incorporate them into the nation’s core institutions. This eye-opening collection of essays examines the many ways in which an increase in the Latino population has impacted the Midwest—culturally, economically, educationally, and politically. Drawing on studies, personal histories, legal rulings, and other sources, this book takes an interdisciplinary approach to an increasingly important topic in American society and offers a glimpse into the nation’s demographic future.

An Alliance of Women

Immigration and the Politics of Race
Author: Heather Merrill
Publisher: Choice Publishing Co., Ltd.
ISBN: 9780816641581
Category: Social Science
Page: 258
View: 5330

Continue Reading →

In the 1980s, Italy transformed from a country of emigration to one of immigration. Italians are now faced daily with the presence of migrants from all over Africa, parts of South and Central America, the Middle East, Asia, and Eastern Europe. While much attention has been paid to the impact on Italians, few studies have focused on the agency of migrants themselves. In An Alliance of Women, Heather Merrill investigates how migrants and Italians struggle over meanings and negotiate social and cultural identities. Taking as a starting point the Italian crisis over immigration in the early 1990s, Merrill examines grassroots interethnic spatial politics among female migrants and Turin feminists in Northern Italy. Using rich ethnographic material, she traces the emergence of Alma Mater—an anti-racist organization formed to address problems encountered by migrant women. Through this analysis, Merrill reveals the dynamics of an alliance consisting of women from many countries of origin and religious and class backgrounds. Highlighting an interdisciplinary approach to migration and the instability of group identities in contemporary Italy, An Alliance of Women presents migrants grappling with spatialized boundaries amid growing nativist and anti-immigrant sentiment in Western Europe. Heather Merrill is assistant professor of geography and anthropology at Dickinson College.

Racial Conditions

Politics, Theory, Comparisons
Author: Howard Winant
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 1452903018
Category: Social Science
Page: 199
View: 7235

Continue Reading →