Gender, Race, and Politics in the Midwest

Black Club Women in Illinois
Author: Wanda A. Hendricks
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253334473
Category: Social Science
Page: 162
View: 589

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Examines the structures and ideologies of Illinois black club women, looks at the activities of some rural and urban clubs, and describes individual women's work in the areas of child and health care, establishing settlement houses, and suffrage efforts.

Women’s Rights, Racial Integration, and Education from 1850–1920

The Case of Sarah Raymond, the First Female Superintendent
Author: M. Noraian
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230101445
Category: Education
Page: 189
View: 2309

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This historical biography examines Sarah Raymond Fitzwilliam's abolitionist roots growing up on a stop of the Underground Railroad, her training at a 'normal school,' her tenure as a teacher, principal and the nation's first city school superintendent (Bloomington, Illinois 1874-1892).

Remaking Respectability

African American Women in Interwar Detroit
Author: Victoria W. Wolcott
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469611007
Category: Social Science
Page: 360
View: 3846

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In the early decades of the twentieth century, tens of thousands of African Americans arrived at Detroit's Michigan Central Station, part of the Great Migration of blacks who left the South seeking improved economic and political conditions in the urban North. The most visible of these migrants have been the male industrial workers who labored on the city's automobile assembly lines. African American women have largely been absent from traditional narratives of the Great Migration because they were excluded from industrial work. By placing these women at the center of her study, Victoria Wolcott reveals their vital role in shaping life in interwar Detroit. Wolcott takes us into the speakeasies, settlement houses, blues clubs, storefront churches, employment bureaus, and training centers of Prohibition- and depression-era Detroit. There, she explores the wide range of black women's experiences, focusing particularly on the interactions between working- and middle-class women. As Detroit's black population grew exponentially, women not only served as models of bourgeois respectability, but also began to reshape traditional standards of deportment in response to the new realities of their lives. In so doing, Wolcott says, they helped transform black politics and culture. Eventually, as the depression arrived, female respectability as a central symbol of reform was supplanted by a more strident working-class activism.

Emancipation's Diaspora

Race and Reconstruction in the Upper Midwest
Author: Leslie A. Schwalm
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807894125
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 3704

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Most studies of emancipation's consequences have focused on the South. Moving the discussion to the North, Leslie Schwalm enriches our understanding of the national impact of the transition from slavery to freedom. Emancipation's Diaspora follows the lives and experiences of thousands of men and women who liberated themselves from slavery, made their way to overwhelmingly white communities in Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, and worked to live in dignity as free women and men and as citizens. Schwalm explores the hotly contested politics of black enfranchisement as well as collisions over segregation, civil rights, and the more informal politics of race--including how slavery and emancipation would be remembered and commemorated. She examines how gender shaped the politics of race, and how gender relations were contested and negotiated within the black community. Based on extensive archival research, Emancipation's Diaspora shows how in churches and schools, in voting booths and Masonic temples, in bustling cities and rural crossroads, black and white Midwesterners--women and men--shaped the local and national consequences of emancipation.

Fannie Barrier Williams

Crossing the Borders of Region and Race
Author: Wanda A. Hendricks
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252095871
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 288
View: 7162

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Born shortly before the Civil War, activist and reformer Fannie Barrier Williams (1855-1944) became one of the most prominent educated African American women of her generation. Hendricks shows how Williams became "raced" for the first time in early adulthood, when she became a teacher in Missouri and Washington, D.C., and faced the injustices of racism and the stark contrast between the lives of freed slaves and her own privileged upbringing in a western New York village. She carried this new awareness to Chicago, where she joined forces with black and predominantly white women's clubs, the Unitarian church, and various other interracial social justice organizations to become a prominent spokesperson for Progressive economic, racial, and gender reforms during the transformative period of industrialization. By highlighting how Williams experienced a set of freedoms in the North that were not imaginable in the South, this clearly-written, widely accessible biography expands how we understand intellectual possibilities, economic success, and social mobility in post-Reconstruction America.

Black women in white

racial conflict and cooperation in the nursing profession, 1890-1950
Author: Darlene Clark Hine
Publisher: Indiana Univ Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: Medical
Page: 264
View: 4491

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The New Politics Of Race And Gender

The 1992 Yearbook Of The Politics Of Education Association
Author: Catherine Marshall
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135720177
Category: Education
Page: 236
View: 9771

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What can schools do to eliminate sexism and racism? By the 1990's with shifting demographics, disillusionment with conventional liberal policies and new political coalitions, the politics of race and gender requires new analyses. The chapters in this book demonstrate how the politics of race and gender enter into proposals for parental choice, business involvement in schools, definitions of good leadership, special schools for minority children, curriculum debates, and debates about testing and accountability. Catherine Marshall provides the political historical context of race and gender politics in schools, and the following eighteen chapters provide a greater in-depth analysis. The chapters include work of scholars and policy analysts focusing on policy and policy implementation at all levels of school politics in the US, Australia and Israel. The book ends with critical policy analysis, raising deep theoretical questions and pulling out the chronic race and gender issues in education politics.

Transnational Latina Narratives in the Twenty-first Century

The Politics of Gender, Race, and Migrations
Author: Juanita Heredia
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230623255
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 176
View: 7720

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Transnational Latina Narratives is the first critical study of its kind to examine twenty-first-century Latina narratives by female authors of diverse Latin American heritages based in the U.S. Heredia s comparative perspective on gender, race and migrations between Latin America and the U.S. demonstrates the changing national landscape that needs to accommodate an ever-growing Latino/a presence. This book draws on the work of Denise Chávez, Sandra Cisneros, Marta Moreno Vega, Angie Cruz, and Marie Arana, as well as a diverse blend of popular culture. Heredia s thought-provoking insights seek to empower the representation of women who are transnational ambassadors in modern trans-American literature.

The Latino Gender Gap in U.S. Politics


Author: Christina E. Bejarano
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135010609
Category: Political Science
Page: 194
View: 4403

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Many questions remain unanswered about the observable differences in voting behavior, partisanship, and cultural attitudes among men and women. Latino political participation in the United States is generally lower than the rest of the population, mainly due to their high proportion of youth and foreign born populations that are ineligible to vote. This dynamic is slowing changing, partly as a result of the rapidly growing Latino population in the United States. This book delves deeper into the complex gender differences for Latino political behavior. More specifically, it is a political analysis of the diverse U.S. Latino population and the interacting factors that can influence male and female differences in voting and policy attitudes. Christina E. Bejarano carefully unpacks more aspects of the gender category for Latinos, including analyzing the gender differences in Latino political behavior across national origin, foreign born status, and generational status. The Latino gender gap can have far-reaching political implications on electoral politics. As the Latino population highlights their growing political sway, the major political parties have and will strategically mobilize and court the Latino electorate, Latinas in particular.

Defending the family altar

gender, race, and family politics in the America First movement, 1940-1945
Author: Laura McEnaney
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: 300
View: 2341

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The Oxford Handbook of American Public Opinion and the Media


Author: Robert Y. Shapiro,Lawrence R. Jacobs
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199545634
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 784
View: 2072

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With engaging new contributions from the major figures in the fields of the media and public opinion The Oxford Handbook of American Public Opinion and the Media is a key point of reference for anyone working in American politics today.

Race, Gender, and Class in the Tea Party

What the Movement Reflects about Mainstream Ideologies
Author: Meghan A. Burke
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739185543
Category: Social Science
Page: 140
View: 3723

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This book makes use of ethnographic data to enrich our understanding of the Tea Party, particularly what it was that drew people to the movement. It argues that, far from radical, the Tea Party reflects the broader realities around race, gender, and class that permeate our social and political system.

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Volume 13: Gender
Author: Nancy Bercaw,Ted Ownby
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469616726
Category: Reference
Page: 408
View: 1978

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This volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture reflects the dramatic increase in research on the topic of gender over the past thirty years, revealing that even the most familiar subjects take on new significance when viewed through the lens of gender. The wide range of entries explores how people have experienced, understood, and used concepts of womanhood and manhood in all sorts of obvious and subtle ways. The volume features 113 articles, 65 of which are entirely new for this edition. Thematic articles address subjects such as sexuality, respectability, and paternalism and investigate the role of gender in broader subjects, including the civil rights movement, country music, and sports. Topical entries highlight individuals such as Oprah Winfrey, the Grimke sisters, and Dale Earnhardt, as well as historical events such as the capture of Jefferson Davis in a woman's dress, the Supreme Court's decision in Loving v. Virginia, and the Memphis sanitation workers' strike, with its slogan, "I AM A MAN." Bringing together scholarship on gender and the body, sexuality, labor, race, and politics, this volume offers new ways to view big questions in southern history and culture.

No Saloon in the Valley

The Southern Strategy of Texas Prohibitionists in the 1880s
Author: James D. Ivy
Publisher: Baylor University Press
ISBN: 0918954878
Category: History
Page: 150
View: 2815

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In this engaging study, James D. Ivy recovers an intriguing and neglected aspect of Texas cultural history--the confluence of social strategies that fueled the Texas prohibition movement. In particular, Ivy contends that Texas prohibitionists developed a southern strategy that characterized prohibition as a reform movement with southern roots in Texas soil. These prohibitionists overtly distanced themselves from northern evangelical reformers that had championed abolition, religious radicalism, or feminism in order to appeal to male voters anxious about their role in post-Reconstruction southern society. While their strategy succeeded insofar as it was able to gain the support of a majority of white males with close ties to the former Confederacy, it failed to persuade a majority of Texas voters to embrace prohibition.

Encyclopedia of Race, Ethnicity, and Society


Author: Richard T. Schaefer
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1452265860
Category: Social Science
Page: 1752
View: 6392

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"This ambitious undertaking touches all bases, is highly accessible, and provides a solid starting point for further exploration." —School Library Journal This three-volume reference presents a comprehensive look at the role race and ethnicity play in society and in our daily lives.. The Encyclopedia of Race, Ethnicity, and Society offers informative coverage of intergroup relations in the United States and the comparative examination of race and ethnicity worldwide. Containing nearly 600 entries, this resource provides a foundation to understanding as well as researching racial and ethnic diversity from a multidisciplinary perspective. Key Features Describes over a hundred racial and ethnic groups, with additional thematic essays discussing broad topics that cut across group boundaries and impact society at large Addresses other issues of inequality that often intersect with the primary focus on race and ethnicity, such as ability, age, class, gender, and sexual orientation Brings together the most distinguished authorities possible, with 375 contributors from 14 different countries Offers broad historical coverage,, ranging from "Kennewick Man" to the "Emancipation Proclamation" to "Hip-Hop" Presents over 90 maps to help the reader comprehend the source of nationalities or the distribution of ethnic or racial groups Provides an easy-to-use statistical appendix with the latest data and carefully selected historical comparisons Key Themes · Biographies · Community and Urban Issues · Concepts and Theories · Criminal Justice · Economics and Stratification · Education · Gender and Family · Global Perspectives · Health and Social Welfare · Immigration and Citizenship · Legislation, Court Decisions, and Treaties · Media, Sports, and Entertainment · Organizations · Prejudice and Discrimination · Public Policy · Racial, Ethnic, and Nationality Groups · Religion · Sociopolitical Movements and Conflicts

Gender Consciousness and Politics


Author: Sue Tolleson Rinehart
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317960831
Category: Social Science
Page: 216
View: 4688

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This book examines the emergence of gender consciousness among women as a significant force in American politics. The author bases her argument on an in-depth empirical analysis of data derived from the U.S. biennial National Election studies of 1974 to 1984, the year of the emergence of the so-called gender gap. The author discusses the fact that while feminism is central to womens' political orientation, the simple awareness of gender differences and group consciousness is a powerful force of change.

Feminist Frontiers

Women Who Shaped the Midwest
Author: Yvonne Johnson
Publisher: Truman State Univ Press
ISBN: 1935503774
Category: History
Page: 232
View: 9417

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Women's stories are noticeably absent from the master narrative of the Populist and Progressive movements, where their struggle for civil rights was more evident in the Midwest than any other region in the country. This collection of eleven biographical essays highlights women leaders in the Midwest who challenged gender, racial, class, and ethnic boundaries in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Not only were these midwestern women powerful orators and active leaders, they were influential in shaping the culture in their communities.

African American Families


Author: Angela J. Hattery,Earl Smith
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1483316882
Category: Family & Relationships
Page: 408
View: 4373

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"Bravo to the authors! They have done an excellent job addressing the issues that are critical to community members, policy makers and interventionists concerned with Black families in the context of our nation." —Michael C. Lambert, University of Missouri, Colombia "African American Families is a timely work. The strength of this text lies in the depth of coverage, clarity, and the ability to combine secondary sources, statistics and qualitative data to reveal the plight of African Americans in society." —Edward Opoku-Dapaah, Winston-Salem State University "African American Families is both engaging and challenging and is perhaps one of the most important works I have read in many years. This book will most certainly move the discourse of the socio-economic conditions of black families forward, beyond the boundaries already set by other books in the market. African American Families is an excellent book whose time has come, and one that I would most definitely adopt." —Lateef O. Badru, University of Louisville African American Families provides a systematic sociological study of contemporary life for families of African descent living in the United States. Analyzing both quantitative and qualitative data, authors Angela J. Hattery and Earl Smith identify the structural barriers that African Americans face in their attempts to raise their children and create loving, healthy, and raise the children of the next generation. Key Features: Uses the lens provided by the race, class, and gender paradigm: Examples illustrate the ways in which multiple systems of oppression interact with patterns of self-defeating behavior to create barriers that deny many African Americans access to the American dream. Addresses issues not fully or adequately addressed in previous books on Black families: These issues include personal responsibility and disproportionately high rates of incarceration, family violence, and chronic illnesses like HIV/AIDS. Brings statistical data to life: The authors weave personal stories based on interviews they've conducted into the usual data from scholarly(?) literature and from U.S. Census Bureau reports. Provides several illustrations from Hurricane Katrina: A contemporary analysis of a recent disaster demonstrates many of the issues presented in the book such as housing segregation and predatory lending practices. Offers extensive data tables in the appendices: Assembled in easy-to-read tables, students are given access to the latest national agencies data from agencies including the U.S. Census Bureau, Centers for Disease Control, and Bureau of Justice Statistics. Intended Audience: This is an ideal textbook for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses such as African American Families, Sociology of the Family, Contemporary Families, and Race and Ethnicity in the departments of Human Development and Family Studies, Sociology, African American Studies, and Black Studies.

Health in the City

Race, Poverty, and the Negotiation of Women’s Health in New York City, 1915–1930
Author: Tanya Hart
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479873063
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 5623

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Shortly after the dawn of the twentieth century, the New York City Department of Health decided to address what it perceived as the racial nature of health. It delivered heavily racialized care in different neighborhoods throughout the city: syphillis treatment among African Americans, tuberculosis for Italian Americans, and so on. It was a challenging and ambitious program, dangerous for the providers, and troublingly reductive for the patients. Nevertheless, poor and working-class African American, British West Indian, and Southern Italian women all received some of the nation’s best health care during this period. Health in the City challenges traditional ideas of early twentieth-century urban black health care by showing a program that was simultaneously racialized and cutting-edge. It reveals that even the most well-meaning public health programs may inadvertently reinforce perceptions of inferiority that they were created to fix.

Latino Heartland

Of Borders and Belonging in the Midwest
Author: Sujey Vega
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479864536
Category: Social Science
Page: 304
View: 4458

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National immigration debates have thrust both opponents of immigration and immigrant rights supporters into the news. But what happens once the rallies end and the banners come down? What is daily life like for Latinos who have been presented nationally as “terrorists, drug smugglers, alien gangs, and violent criminals”? Latino Heartland offers an ethnography of the Latino and non-Latino residents of a small Indiana town, showing how national debate pitted neighbor against neighbor—and the strategies some used to combat such animosity. It conveys the lived impact of divisive political rhetoric on immigration and how race, gender, class, and ethnicity inform community belonging in the twenty-first century. Latino Heartland illuminates how community membership was determined yet simultaneously re-made by those struggling to widen the scope of who was imagined as a legitimate resident citizen of this Midwestern space. The volume draws on interviews with Latinos—both new immigrants and long-standing U.S. citizens—and whites, as well as African Americans, to provide a sense of the racial dynamics in play as immigrants asserted their right to belong to the community. Latino Hoosiers asserted a right to redefine what belonging meant within their homes, at their spaces of worship, and in the public eye. Through daily acts of ethnic belonging, Spanish-speaking residents navigated their own sense of community that did not require that they abandon their difference just to be accepted. In Latino Heartland, Sujey Vega addresses the politics of immigration, showing us how increasingly diverse towns can work toward embracing their complexity.