Full-Rip 9.0

The Next Big Earthquake in the Pacific Northwest
Author: Sandi Doughton
Publisher: Sasquatch Books
ISBN: 1570618550
Category: Nature
Page: 288
View: 371

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Scientists have identified Seattle, Portland, and Vancouver as the urban centers of what will be the biggest earthquake—the Really Big One—in the continental United States. A quake will happen--in fact it's actually overdue. The Cascadia subduction zone is 750 miles long, running along the Pacific coast from Northern California up to southern British Columbia. In this fascinating book, The Seattle Times science reporter Sandi Doughton introduces readers to the scientists who are dedicated to understanding the way the earth moves and describes what patterns can be identified and how prepared (or not) people are. With a 100% chance of a mega-quake hitting the Pacific Northwest, this fascinating book reports on the scientists who are trying to understand when, where, and just how big THE BIG ONE will be. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Full-Rip 9.0

The Next Big Earthquake in the Pacific Northwest
Author: Sandi Doughton
Publisher: Sasquatch Books
ISBN: 1570618550
Category: Nature
Page: 288
View: 5820

Continue Reading →

Scientists have identified Seattle, Portland, and Vancouver as the urban centers of what will be the biggest earthquake—the Really Big One—in the continental United States. A quake will happen--in fact it's actually overdue. The Cascadia subduction zone is 750 miles long, running along the Pacific coast from Northern California up to southern British Columbia. In this fascinating book, The Seattle Times science reporter Sandi Doughton introduces readers to the scientists who are dedicated to understanding the way the earth moves and describes what patterns can be identified and how prepared (or not) people are. With a 100% chance of a mega-quake hitting the Pacific Northwest, this fascinating book reports on the scientists who are trying to understand when, where, and just how big THE BIG ONE will be. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Cascadia's Fault

The Coming Earthquake and Tsunami that Could Devastate North America
Author: Jerry Thompson
Publisher: Counterpoint Press
ISBN: 1619020866
Category: Nature
Page: 352
View: 9413

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There is a crack in the earth’s crust that runs roughly 31 miles offshore, approximately 683 miles from Northern California up through Vancouver Island off the coast of British Columbia. The Cascadia Subduction Zone has generated massive earthquakes over and over again throughout geologic time—at least thirty-six major events in the last 10,000 years. This fault generates a monster earthquake about every 500 years. And the monster is due to return at any time. It could happen 200 years from now, or it could be tonight. The Cascadia Subduction Zone is virtually identical to the offshore fault that wrecked Sumatra in 2004. It will generate the same earthquake we saw in Sumatra, at magnitude nine or higher, sending crippling shockwaves across a far wider area than any California quake. Slamming into Sacramento, Portland, Seattle, Victoria, and Vancouver, it will send tidal waves to the shores of Australia, New Zealand, and Japan, damaging the economies of the Pacific Rim countries and their trading partners for years to come. In light of recent massive quakes in Haiti, Chile, and Mexico, Cascadia’s Fault not only tells the story of this potentially devastating earthquake and the tsunamis it will spawn, it also warns us about an impending crisis almost unprecedented in modern history.

The Weather of the Pacific Northwest


Author: Clifford Mass
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295998369
Category: Science
Page: 336
View: 1981

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The Pacific Northwest experiences the most varied and fascinating weather in the United States, including world-record winter snows, the strongest non-tropical storms in the nation, and shifts from desert to rain forest in a matter of miles. Local weather features dominate the meteorological landscape, from the Puget Sound convergence zone and wind surges along the Washington Coast, to gap winds through the Columbia Gorge and the �Banana Belt� of southern Oregon. This book is the first comprehensive and authoritative guide to Northwest weather that is directed to the general reader; helpful to boaters, hikers, and skiers; and valuable to expert meteorologists. In The Weather of the Pacific Northwest, University of Washington atmospheric scientist and popular radio commentator Cliff Mass unravels the intricacies of Northwest weather, from the mundane to the mystifying. By examining our legendary floods, snowstorms, and windstorms, and a wide variety of local weather features, Mass answers such interesting questions as: o Why does the Northwest have localized rain shadows? o What is the origin of the hurricane force winds that often buffet the region? o Why does the Northwest have so few thunderstorms? o What is the origin of the Pineapple Express? o Why do ferryboats sometimes seem to float above the water's surface? o Why is it so hard to predict Northwest weather? Mass brings together eyewitness accounts, historical records, and meteorological science to explain Pacific Northwest weather. He also considers possible local effects of global warming. The final chapters guide readers in interpreting the Northwest sky and in securing weather information on their own.

The Great Quake

How the Biggest Earthquake in North America Changed Our Understanding of the Planet
Author: Henry Fountain
Publisher: Crown Publishing Group (NY)
ISBN: 1101904062
Category: History
Page: 277
View: 5017

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"In the tradition of Erik Larson's Isaac's Storm, a riveting narrative about the biggest earthquake in recorded history in North America--the 1964 Alaskan earthquake that demolished the city of Valdez and obliterated the coastal village of Chenega--and the scientist sent to look for geological clues to explain the dynamics of earthquakes, who helped to confirm the then controversial theory of plate tectonics. On March 27, 1964, at 5:36 p.m., the biggest earthquake ever recorded in North America--and the second biggest ever in the world, measuring 9.2 on the Richter scale--struck Alaska, devastating coastal towns and villages and killing more than 130 people in what was then a relatively sparsely populated region. In a riveting tale about the almost unimaginable brute force of nature, New York Times science journalist Henry Fountain, in his first trade book, re-creates the lives of the villagers and townspeople living in Chenega, Anchorage, and Valdez; describes the sheer beauty of the geology of the region, with its towering peaks and 20-mile-long glaciers; and reveals the impact of the quake on the towns, the buildings, and the lives of the inhabitants. George Plafker, a geologist for the U.S. Geological Survey with years of experience scouring the Alaskan wilderness, is asked to investigate the Prince William Sound region in the aftermath of the quake, to better understand its origins. His work confirmed the then controversial theory of plate tectonics that explained how and why such deadly quakes occur, and how we can plan for the next one"--

When the Earth Shakes

Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Tsunamis
Author: Simon Winchester
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101997133
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 80
View: 5447

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Earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis. Headline-making natural disasters with devastating consequences for millions of people. But what do we actually know about these literally earth-shaking events? New York Times bestselling author, explorer, journalist, and geologist Simon Winchester—who’s been shaken by earthquakes in New Zealand, skied through Greenland to help prove the theory of plate tectonics, and even charred the soles of his boots climbing a volcano—looks at the science, technology, and societal impact of these inter-connected natural phenomena. A master nonfiction storyteller, Winchester digs deep into the powerful natural forces that shape the earth, exploring the how and why of world-changing events from the 19th-century’s infamous volcanic eruption at Krakatoa and the earthquake that flattened San Francisco, to the 21st-century tsunamis that devastated Indonesia and Japan. It’s a gripping story about what happens when our seemingly unmovable planet shakes, explodes, and floods—all richly illustrated with fascinating historical and stunning contemporary photographs. From the Hardcover edition.

Measure of a Mountain

Beauty and Terror on Mount Rainier
Author: Bruce Barcott
Publisher: Sasquatch Books
ISBN: 1570618003
Category: Nature
Page: 288
View: 2656

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In The Measure of a Mountain, Seattle writer Bruce Barcott sets out to know Rainier. His method is exploratory, meandering, personal. He begins by encircling it, first by car then on foot. He finds that the mountain is a complex of moss-bearded hemlocks and old-growth firs, high meadows that blossom according to a precise natural timeclock, sheets of crumbling pumice, fractured glaciers, and unsteady magma. Its snow fields bristle with bug life, and its marmots chew rocks to keep their teeth from overgrowing. Rainier rumbles with seismic twitches and jerks—some one-hundred-thirty earthquakes annually. The nightmare among geologists is the unstoppable wall of mud that will come rolling down its slopes when a hunk of mountain falls off, as it does every half century (and we’re fifty years overdue). Rainier is both an obsession and a temple that attracts its own passionate acolytes: scientists, priests, rangers, and mountain guides. Rainier is also a monument to death: every year someone manages just to disappear on its flanks; imperiled climbers and their rescuers perish on glaciers; a planeload of Marines remains lodged in ice since they crashed into the mountain in 1946. Referred to by locals as simply "the mountain," it is the single largest feature of the Pacific Northwest landscape—provided it isn’t hidden in clouds. Visible or not, though, it’s presence is undeniable.

Cascadia


Author: H. W. Buzz Bernard
Publisher: Bell Bridge Books
ISBN: 1611946972
Category: Fiction
Page: N.A
View: 7340

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If you live in the Pacific Northwest, get ready to run for your life . . . In the face of a massive earthquake and tsunami in the Pacific Northwest, a respected geologist must make two gut-wrenching decisions. One could cost him his reputation, the other, his life. Is the Northwest overdue for a huge quake and tsunami, or will the region remain safe for hundreds of years yet to come? No one knows... or does someone? Dr. Rob Elwood, a geologist whose specialty is earthquakes and tsunamis, is having nightmares of "the big one" that are way too real to disregard. His friend, a counselor and retired reverend, does not think Rob is going nuts. To the contrary, he believes the dreams are premonitions to be taken seriously. No one else does, however, even after a press conference. Some live to regret it, most don't. Rob's drama becomes intertwined with others--a retired fighter pilot trying to make amends to a woman he jilted decades ago and a quixotic retiree searching for legendary buried treasure in the rugged coastal mountains of Oregon. All are about to live Rob's nightmare. "Riveting, scary, and entirely believable . . . a compelling, page-turning thriller with the ring of truth." Jerry Thompson, author of Cascadia's Fault H. W. "Buzz" Bernard, a native Oregonian born in Eugene and raised in Portland, is a best-selling, award-winning novelist. His debut novel, Eyewall, which one reviewer called a "perfect summer beach read," was released in May 2011 and went on to become a number-one best seller in Amazon's Kindle Store. Before becoming a novelist, Buzz worked at The Weather Channel in Atlanta, Georgia, as a senior meteorologist for thirteen years. Prior to that, he served as a weather officer in the U.S. Air Force for over three decades. He attained the rank of colonel and his "airborne" experiences include a mission with the Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunters, air drops over the Arctic Ocean and Turkey, and a stint as a weather officer aboard a Tactical Air Command airborne command post (C-135).

Quakeland

On the Road to America's Next Devastating Earthquake
Author: Kathryn Miles
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698411463
Category: Nature
Page: 368
View: 1559

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A journey around the United States in search of the truth about the threat of earthquakes leads to spine-tingling discoveries, unnerving experts, and ultimately the kind of preparations that will actually help guide us through disasters. It’s a road trip full of surprises. Earthquakes. You need to worry about them only if you’re in San Francisco, right? Wrong. We have been making enormous changes to subterranean America, and Mother Earth, as always, has been making some of her own. . . . The consequences for our real estate, our civil engineering, and our communities will be huge because they will include earthquakes most of us do not expect and cannot imagine—at least not without reading Quakeland. Kathryn Miles descends into mines in the Northwest, dissects Mississippi levee engineering studies, uncovers the horrific risks of an earthquake in the Northeast, and interviews the seismologists, structual engineers, and emergency managers around the country who are addressing this ground shaking threat. As Miles relates, the era of human-induced earthquakes began in 1962 in Colorado after millions of gallons of chemical-weapon waste was pumped underground in the Rockies. More than 1,500 quakes over the following seven years resulted. The Department of Energy plans to dump spent nuclear rods in the same way. Evidence of fracking’s seismological impact continues to mount. . . . Humans as well as fault lines built our “quakeland”. What will happen when Memphis, home of FedEx's 1.5-million-packages-a-day hub, goes offline as a result of an earthquake along the unstable Reelfoot Fault? FEMA has estimated that a modest 7.0 magnitude quake (twenty of these happen per year around the world) along the Wasatch Fault under Salt Lake City would put a $33 billion dent in our economy. When the Fukushima reactor melted down, tens of thousands were displaced. If New York’s Indian Point nuclear power plant blows, ten million people will be displaced. How would that evacuation even begin? Kathryn Miles’ tour of our land is as fascinating and frightening as it is irresistibly compelling.

The Big One

What to Do Before, During, After the Imminent Cascadia Subduction Zone Earthquake
Author: Vernelle J. Judy
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781539484974
Category:
Page: 84
View: 6418

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This manual is the guidance needed to prepare for the largest natural disaster to hit the West Coast of America in more than 300 years: The Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake. On these pages you will find specific, practical and easy steps to prepare your home, your family, yourself to remain safe, stay healthy and survive well.

The Next Tsunami

Living on a Restless Coast
Author: Bonnie Henderson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780870717321
Category: Nature
Page: 322
View: 3014

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The Next Tsunami: Living on a Restless Coast is the gripping story of the geological discoveries--and the scientists who uncovered them--that signal the imminence of a catastrophic tsunami on the Northwest Coast.

The 9/11 Commission Report

Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States
Author: N.A
Publisher: Government Printing Office
ISBN: 0160891809
Category: Political Science
Page: 587
View: 403

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This edition has been designated as the only official U.S. Government edition of the 9-11 Commission’s Final Report. It provides a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks, including preparedness for and the immediate response to the attacks. It also includes recommendations designed to guard against future attacks.

The Big Ones

How Natural Disasters Have Shaped Us (and What We Can Do About Them)
Author: Lucy Jones
Publisher: Doubleday
ISBN: 0385542712
Category: Nature
Page: 256
View: 5203

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By the world-renowned seismologist, a riveting history of natural disasters, their impact on our culture, and new ways of thinking about the ones to come Earthquakes, floods, tsunamis, hurricanes, volcanoes--they stem from the same forces that give our planet life. Earthquakes give us natural springs; volcanoes produce fertile soil. It is only when these forces exceed our ability to withstand them that they become disasters. Together they have shaped our cities and their architecture; elevated leaders and toppled governments; influenced the way we think, feel, fight, unite, and pray. The history of natural disasters is a history of ourselves. In The Big Ones, leading seismologist Dr. Lucy Jones offers a bracing look at some of the world's greatest natural disasters, whose reverberations we continue to feel today. At Pompeii, Jones explores how a volcanic eruption in the first century AD challenged prevailing views of religion. She examines the California floods of 1862 and the limits of human memory. And she probes more recent events--such as the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 and the American hurricanes of 2017--to illustrate the potential for globalization to humanize and heal. With population in hazardous regions growing and temperatures around the world rising, the impacts of natural disasters are greater than ever before. The Big Ones is more than just a work of history or science; it is a call to action. Natural hazards are inevitable; human catastrophes are not. With this energizing and exhaustively researched book, Dr. Jones offers a look at our past, readying us to face down the Big Ones in our future.

The Art of Cruelty: A Reckoning


Author: Maggie Nelson
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393082237
Category: Art
Page: 304
View: 5410

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“This is criticism at its best.”—Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times Writing in the tradition of Susan Sontag and Elaine Scarry, Maggie Nelson has emerged as one of our foremost cultural critics with this landmark work about representations of cruelty and violence in art. From Sylvia Plath’s poetry to Francis Bacon’s paintings, from the Saw franchise to Yoko Ono’s performance art, Nelson’s nuanced exploration across the artistic landscape ultimately offers a model of how one might balance strong ethical convictions with an equally strong appreciation for work that tests the limits of taste, taboo, and permissibility.

The Engine 2 Diet

The Texas Firefighter's 28-Day Save-Your-Life Plan that Lowers Cholesterol and Burns Away the Pounds
Author: Rip Esselstyn
Publisher: Grand Central Life & Style
ISBN: 9780446543682
Category: Health & Fitness
Page: 288
View: 3748

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Lose weight, lower cholesterol, significantly reduce the risk of disease, and become physically fit--in just 4 weeks. Professional athlete-turned-firefighter Rip Esselstyn is used to responding to emergencies. So, when he learned that some of his fellow Engine 2 firefighters in Austin, TX, were in dire physical condition-several had dangerously high cholesterol levels (the highest was 344!)-he sprang into action and created a life-saving plan for the firehouse. By following Rip's program, everyone lost weight (some more than 20 lbs.), lowered their cholesterol (Mr. 344's dropped to 196), and improved their overall health. Now, Rip outlines his proven plan in this book. With Rip as your expert coach and motivator, you'll transform your body and lifestyle in a month. His plant-powered eating plan is based on a diet of whole foods, including whole grains, fresh fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, and seeds. This invaluable guide features: **Dozens of easy, mouthwatering recipes-from pancakes to pizza, Tex-Mex favorites to knockout chocolate desserts-that will keep you looking forward to every bite **Pantry-stocking tips will take the panic out of inevitable cravings and on-the-fly meals **Guidelines on menu choices that will allow you to eat out, wherever and whenever you want **Rip's simple, firefighter-inspired exercise program that will boost your metabolism and melt your fat away. Medically approved, easy-to-follow, and amazingly effective, this diet is designed for anyone who wants to make heroic strides in his or her health, weight, and well-being-all without heroic effort. "Want to be as strong as a Texas firefighter? Or as healthy as a professional triathlete? Then follow the wonderful advice of Rip Esselstyn, who is both. His book can save your life--whether you're a man or a woman. Highly recommended!" -Dean Ornish, M.D., Founder and President, Preventive Medicine Research Institute, Clinical Professor of Medicine, U of California SF, author, Dr. Dean Ornish's Program for Reversing Heart Disease

Natural Disasters and Risk Communication

Implications of the Cascadia Subduction Zone Megaquake
Author: C. Vail Fletcher,Jennette Lovejoy
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 1498556124
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 278
View: 5341

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Natural Disasters and Risk Communication: Implications of the Cascadia Subduction Zone Megaquake asks and addresses how we communicate about natural disasters and what effect our communication has on natural disaster education, understanding, assessment of risk, preparation, and recovery. The chapters of this book present expertise, analyses, and perspectives that are designed to help us better comprehend and deal with the natural risks such as the Cascadia Subduction Zone. It seeks to move past primal, fear-induced physiological and emotional responses to crises with the understanding that if we accept that the disaster will occur, expect it, and learn how we can prepare, we can calm the collective panicked beats of our hearts as we wait for its first tremors.

Of Forests and Fields

Mexican Labor in the Pacific Northwest
Author: Mario Jimenez Sifuentez
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813576911
Category: Social Science
Page: 186
View: 3635

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2016 Choice Oustanding Academic Title Just looking at the Pacific Northwest’s many verdant forests and fields, it may be hard to imagine the intense work it took to transform the region into the agricultural powerhouse it is today. Much of this labor was provided by Mexican guest workers, Tejano migrants, and undocumented immigrants, who converged on the region beginning in the mid-1940s. Of Forests and Fields tells the story of these workers, who toiled in the fields, canneries, packing sheds, and forests, turning the Pacific Northwest into one of the most productive agricultural regions in the country. Employing an innovative approach that traces the intersections between Chicana/o labor and environmental history, Mario Sifuentez shows how ethnic Mexican workers responded to white communities that only welcomed them when they were economically useful, then quickly shunned them. He vividly renders the feelings of isolation and desperation that led to the formation of ethnic Mexican labor organizations like the Pineros y Campesinos Unidos Noroeste (PCUN) farm workers union, which fought back against discrimination and exploitation. Of Forests and Fields not only extends the scope of Mexican labor history beyond the Southwest, it offers valuable historical precedents for understanding the struggles of immigrant and migrant laborers in our own era. Sifuentez supplements his extensive archival research with a unique set of first-hand interviews, offering new perspectives on events covered in the printed historical record. A descendent of ethnic Mexican immigrant laborers in Oregon, Sifuentez also poignantly demonstrates the links between the personal and political, as his research leads him to amazing discoveries about his own family history. www.mariosifuentez.com

Earthquake Prediction

Dawn of the New Seismology
Author: David Nabhan
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Inc.
ISBN: 1510720987
Category: Science
Page: 248
View: 9045

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Each year the world faces thousands of earthquakes of magnitude 5.0 or greater, resulting in devastating property destruction and tragic loss of life. To help avert these catastrophes, scientists have long searched for ways to predict when and where earthquakes will happen. The earth science establishment in the US says that earthquake prediction still lies outside the realm of possibility. But recent scientific developments across the globe suggest that seismic forecasting is on the horizon. Earthquake Prediction: Dawn of the New Seismology examines the latest scientific clues in hopes of discovering seismic precursors which may shed light on real earthquake prediction in the future. It is destined to be nothing less than an epoch-changing work, addressing this ancient enigma by joining the parts of a scientific detective story that ranges from the steppes of Russia to the coast of Chile, bringing to light astounding breakthroughs by researchers in Italy, India and elsewhere. Governments in countries such as China and Japan provide support for seismic forecasting, and it is time for our country to do the same. Earthquake Prediction makes the case, with an important message for the tens of millions of Americans on the US West Coast, the Mississippi River Valley, and other seismically active zones.