Front-Page Girls

Women Journalists in American Culture and Fiction, 1880–1930
Author: Jean Marie Lutes
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 150172830X
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 603

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Looks at the role of real and fictional newswomen in American literary culture in the twentieth century, including Nellie Bly and Ida B. Wells.

Front-Page Girls

Women Journalists in American Culture and Fiction, 1880-1930
Author: Jean Marie Lutes
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801474125
Category: History
Page: 226
View: 3338

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The first study of the role of the newspaperwoman in American literary culture at the turn of the twentieth century, this book recaptures the imaginative exchange between real-life reporters like Nellie Bly and Ida B. Wells and fictional characters like Henrietta Stackpole, the lady-correspondent in Henry James's Portrait of a Lady. It chronicles the exploits of a neglected group of American women writers and uncovers an alternative reporter-novelist tradition that runs counter to the more familiar story of gritty realism generated in male-dominated newsrooms. Taking up actual newspaper accounts written by women, fictional portrayals of female journalists, and the work of reporters-turned-novelists such as Willa Cather and Djuna Barnes, Jean Marie Lutes finds in women's journalism a rich and complex source for modern American fiction. Female journalists, cast as both standard-bearers and scapegoats of an emergent mass culture, created fictions of themselves that far outlasted the fleeting news value of the stories they covered. Front-Page Girls revives the spectacular stories of now-forgotten newspaperwomen who were not afraid of becoming the news themselves--the defiant few who wrote for the city desks of mainstream newspapers and resisted the growing demand to fill women's columns with fashion news and household hints. It also examines, for the first time, how women's journalism shaped the path from news to novels for women writers.

Front Page Girls

Women Journalists in American Culture and Fiction, 1880-1930
Author: Jean Marie Lutes
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801442353
Category: History
Page: 226
View: 8986

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Looks at the role of real and fictional newswomen in American literary culture in the twentieth century, including Nellie Bly and Ida B. Wells.

Women in American Journalism

A New History
Author: Jan Whitt
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252075560
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 189
View: 1621

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The previously untold stories of women throughout the history of journalism

Girl Reporter

Gender, Journalism, and the Movies
Author: Howard Good
Publisher: Scarecrow Press
ISBN: 9780810833982
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 189
View: 5488

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Howard Good uses Torchy Blane, the hero of nine Warner Brothers films from the 1930s, as the centerpiece of this important cultural study of Hollywood's infatuation with the female reporter. Good argues that, despite illusions of equality between male and female reporters on film, many portrayals of female reporters in fact reinforce traditional gender roles. Good draws on a variety of cultural materials to deploy his argument. Not only does he include close readings of many important films from the 1930s through the 1990s, but he also presents theater posters, press books, legal documents, comic strips, fan magazines, and film reviews. Other sisters of the female reporter movie role that the book investigates include characters played by Joan Crawford and Katharine Hepburn, as well as recent portrayals of women reporters in popular films such as The Paper, I Love Trouble, and To Die For. This book does not just stop its investigation at the portrayal of women as reporters in movies. Good concludes with a crucial comparison of the female reporter on screen and her counterpart in the real world. He raises disturbing questions about ethics, conduct, and gender relations in journalism that Hollywood films have not yet been able to resolve satisfactorily. Written boldly, Howard Good provides a fresh and exciting look at a classic Hollywood role that supports the possibility that Torchy Blane, and other female film reporters and their real-world counterparts, are the grittiest girls around.

Around the World in Seventy-Two Days


Author: Nellie Bly
Publisher: Charles River Editors via PublishDrive
ISBN: 1508001618
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 252
View: 4392

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Chios Classics brings literature's greatest works back to life for new generations.All our books contain a linked table of contents. Nellie Bly was the pen name of Elizabeth Jane Cochrane, an American journalist.Bly was a famous reporter and a pioneer of investigative journalism.Bly wrote a popular memoir on her experience in taking a trip around the world in 1889 and 1890.

Girls' Series Fiction and American Popular Culture


Author: LuElla D'Amico
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 1498517641
Category: Social Science
Page: 352
View: 325

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This collection explores the influence of girls’ series books on popular American culture and girls’ everyday experiences. It explores the cultural work that the series genre performs, contemplating the books’ messages about subjects including race, gender, and education, and examines girl fiction within a variety of disciplinary contexts.

Heroes and Scoundrels

The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture
Author: Matthew C. Ehrlich,Joe Saltzman
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252096991
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 8423

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Whether it's the rule-defying lifer, the sharp-witted female newshound, or the irascible editor in chief, journalists in popular culture have shaped our views of the press and its role in a free society since mass culture arose over a century ago. Drawing on portrayals of journalists in television, film, radio, novels, comics, plays, and other media, Matthew C. Ehrlich and Joe Saltzman survey how popular media has depicted the profession across time. Their creative use of media artifacts provides thought-provoking forays into such fundamental issues as how pop culture mythologizes and demythologizes key events in journalism history and how it confronts issues of race, gender, and sexual orientation on the job. From Network to The Wire, from Lois Lane to Mikael Blomkvist, Heroes and Scoundrels reveals how portrayals of journalism's relationship to history, professionalism, power, image, and war influence our thinking and the very practice of democracy.

California Vieja

Culture and Memory in a Modern American Place
Author: Phoebe S. Kropp
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520258045
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 2708

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"This is a rich and learned volume that has a story to tell to those seeking to understand contemporary Southern California."—David Johnson, managing editor of the Pacific Historical Review "Engagingly written and well researched, California Vieja is an intriguing, persuasive examination of the politics of memory and the built environment in southern California."—Vicki Ruiz, author of From Out of the Shadows: Mexican Women in Twentieth-Century America

American Culture, American Tastes

Social Change and the 20th Century
Author: Michael Kammen
Publisher: Knopf
ISBN: 0307827712
Category: Social Science
Page: 352
View: 9874

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Americans have a long history of public arguments about taste, the uses of leisure, and what is culturally appropriate in a democracy that has a strong work ethic. Michael Kammen surveys these debates as well as our changing taste preferences, especially in the past century, and the shifting perceptions that have accompanied them. Professor Kammen shows how the post-traditional popular culture that flourished after the 1880s became full-blown mass culture after World War II, in an era of unprecedented affluence and travel. He charts the influence of advertising and opinion polling; the development of standardized products, shopping centers, and mass-marketing; the separation of youth and adult culture; the gradual repudiation of the genteel tradition; and the commercialization of organized entertainment. He stresses the significance of television in the shaping of mass culture, and of consumerism in its reconfiguration over the past two decades. Focusing on our own time, Kammen discusses the use of the fluid nature of cultural taste to enlarge audiences and increase revenues, and reveals how the public role of intellectuals and cultural critics has declined as the power of corporate sponsors and promoters has risen. As a result of this diminution of cultural authority, he says, definitive pronouncements have been replaced by divergent points of view, and there is, as well, a tendency to blur fact and fiction, reality and illusion. An important commentary on the often conflicting ways Americans have understood, defined, and talked about their changing culture in the twentieth century.

Relationship Sabotage

Unconscious Factors that Destroy Couples, Marriages, and Family
Author: William J. Matta
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275989217
Category: Family & Relationships
Page: 162
View: 7278

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Explains how and why unconscious forces, or imprints, cause many people to destroy their relationships, and what we can do to recognize and counter those forces.

Atlantic Citizens


Author: Leslie Eckel
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748669396
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 248
View: 9077

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This book uncovers startling contributions to transatlantic culture and makes the argument that literature is dependent upon other modes of professional creativity in order to thrive.

Culture of Empire

American Writers, Mexico, and Mexican Immigrants, 1880–1930
Author: Gilbert G. González
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292778988
Category: History
Page: 265
View: 2566

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A history of the Chicano community cannot be complete without taking into account the United States' domination of the Mexican economy beginning in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, writes Gilbert G. González. For that economic conquest inspired U.S. writers to create a "culture of empire" that legitimated American dominance by portraying Mexicans and Mexican immigrants as childlike "peons" in need of foreign tutelage, incapable of modernizing without Americanizing, that is, submitting to the control of U.S. capital. So powerful was and is the culture of empire that its messages about Mexicans shaped U.S. public policy, particularly in education, throughout the twentieth century and even into the twenty-first. In this stimulating history, Gilbert G. González traces the development of the culture of empire and its effects on U.S. attitudes and policies toward Mexican immigrants. Following a discussion of the United States' economic conquest of the Mexican economy, González examines several hundred pieces of writing by American missionaries, diplomats, business people, journalists, academics, travelers, and others who together created the stereotype of the Mexican peon and the perception of a "Mexican problem." He then fully and insightfully discusses how this misinformation has shaped decades of U.S. public policy toward Mexican immigrants and the Chicano (now Latino) community, especially in terms of the way university training of school superintendents, teachers, and counselors drew on this literature in forming the educational practices that have long been applied to the Mexican immigrant community.

Henry James and the Culture of Publicity


Author: Richard Salmon
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521562492
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 233
View: 6483

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By drawing upon contemporary critical theory, Salmon offers a reassessment of the politics of James's cultural criticism.

A Front Page Affair


Author: Radha Vatsal
Publisher: Sourcebooks, Inc.
ISBN: 1492632678
Category: Fiction
Page: 336
View: 7942

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New York City, 1915 The Lusitania has just been sunk, and headlines about a shooting at J.P. Morgan's mansion and the Great War are splashed across the front page of every newspaper. Capability "Kitty" Weeks would love nothing more than to report on the news of the day, but she's stuck writing about fashion and society gossip over on the Ladies' Page—until a man is murdered at a high society picnic on her beat. Determined to prove her worth as a journalist, Kitty finds herself plunged into the midst of a wartime conspiracy that threatens to derail the United States' attempt to remain neutral—and to disrupt the privileged life she has always known. Radha Vatsal's A Front Page Affair is the first book in highly anticipated series featuring rising journalism star Kitty Weeks.

Reforming Fictions

Native, African, and Jewish American Women's Literature and Journalism in the Progressive Era
Author: Carol J. Batker
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231118507
Category: History
Page: 202
View: 2416

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A fresh, multicultural reading of the work of women writers of the Progressive era that places their fiction in the context of their reform journalism and political activism.

Stephen Crane, Journalism, and the Making of Modern American Literature


Author: Michael Robertson
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231109697
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 253
View: 1420

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Born in 1871, Stephen Crane came of age when mass-circulation newspapers began to attract readers with stories that resembled realist fiction--such as Crane's RED BADGE OF COURAGE in 1895. Ernest Hemingway and Theodore Dreiser were two writers greatly influenced by Crane's work. This lucid cultural history goes beyond biography to trace a literary revolution that changed the nature of newspaper reporting forever. 6 illustrations.

Detective Fiction and the Rise of the Japanese Novel, 1880-1930


Author: Satoru Saito
Publisher: Harvard Univ Council on East Asian
ISBN: 9780674065864
Category: History
Page: 308
View: 5591

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Satoru Saito examines the similarities between detective fiction and the novel in prewar Japan. Arguing that interactions between the genres were critical moments of literary engagement, Saito demonstrates how detective fiction provided a framework through which to examine and critique Japan s literary formations and its modernizing society."

Southern Horrors

Women and the Politics of Rape and Lynching
Author: Crystal Nicole Feimster
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674035621
Category: History
Page: 314
View: 9463

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Between 1880 and 1930, close to 200 women were murdered by lynch mobs in the American South. Many more were tarred and feathered, burned, whipped, or raped. In this brutal world of white supremacist politics and patriarchy, a world violently divided by race, gender, and class, black and white women defended themselves and challenged the male power brokers. Crystal Feimster breaks new ground in her story of the racial politics of the postbellum South by focusing on the volatile issue of sexual violence. Pairing the lives of two Southern womenâe"Ida B. Wells, who fearlessly branded lynching a white tool of political terror against southern blacks, and Rebecca Latimer Felton, who urged white men to prove their manhood by lynching black men accused of raping white womenâe"Feimster makes visible the ways in which black and white women sought protection and political power in the New South. While Wells was black and Felton was white, both were journalists, temperance women, suffragists, and anti-rape activists. By placing their concerns at the center of southern politics, Feimster illuminates a critical and novel aspect of southern racial and sexual dynamics. Despite being on opposite sides of the lynching question, both Wells and Felton sought protection from sexual violence and political empowerment for women. Southern Horrors provides a startling view into the Jim Crow South where the precarious and subordinate position of women linked black and white anti-rape activists together in fragile political alliances. It is a story that reveals how the complex drama of political power, race, and sex played out in the lives of Southern women.

Ladies' Pages

African American Women's Magazines and the Culture that Made Them
Author: Noliwe M. Rooks
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813534244
Category: Social Science
Page: 175
View: 6807

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Noliwe M. Rooks's Ladies' Pages sheds light on the most influential African American women's magazines--Ringwood's Afro-American Journal of Fashion, Half-Century Magazine for the Colored Homemaker, Tan Confessions, Essence, and O, the Oprah Magazine--and their little-known success in shaping the lives of black women. Ladies' Pages demonstrates how these rare and thought-provoking publications contributed to the development of African American culture and the ways in which they in turn reflect important historical changes in black communities.