French Revolutions

Cycling the Tour de France
Author: Tim Moore
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780312316129
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 288
View: 7658

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Spring/Summer 2003

Gironimo!: Riding the Very Terrible 1914 Tour of Italy


Author: Tim Moore
Publisher: Pegasus Books
ISBN: 1605987794
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 368
View: 7114

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The 1914 Giro d’Italia: The hardest bike race in history. Eighty-one riders started and only eight finished after enduring cataclysmic storms, roads strewn with nails, and even the loss of an eye by one competitor. And now Tim Moore is going to ride it. And he’s committed to total authenticity. . . Twelve years after Tim Moore toiled around the route of the Tour de France, he senses his achievement being undermined by the truth about 'Horrid Lance'. His rash response is to take on a fearsome challenge from an age of untarnished heroes: the notorious 1914 Giro d'Italia. History's most appalling bike race was an ordeal of 400-kilometer stages, filled with cataclysmic storms, roads strewn with nails, and even the loss of an eye by one competitor—and it was all on a diet of raw eggs and red wine. Of the eighty-one riders who rolled out of Milan, only eight made it back. To truly capture the essence of what these riders endured a century ago, Tim acquires the ruined husk of a gear-less, wooden-wheeled 1914 road bike, some maps, and an alarming period outfit topped off with a pair of blue-lensed welding goggles. As Moore rides up and over the Alps and then down to the Adriatic (with only wine corks for breaks) Gironimo! is an adventure that is by turns recklessly incompetent, bold, beautiful and madly inspiring.

The Cyclist Who Went Out in the Cold: Adventures Riding the Iron Curtain


Author: Tim Moore
Publisher: Pegasus Books
ISBN: 1681773678
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 368
View: 5731

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Tim Moore and a rickety metal steed are back together—riding the entirety of the Iron Curtain, where history, mechanical failures, physical endurance, and humor come together for "the Bill Bryson on two wheels." Not content with tackling the Italian Alps or the route of the Tour de France, Tim Moore sets out to scale a new peak of rash over-ambition: 6,000 mile route of the old Iron Curtain on a tiny-wheeled, two-geared East German shopping bike. Asking for trouble and getting it, Moore sets off from the northernmost Norwegian-Russian border at the Arctic winter’s brutal height, bullying his plucky MIFA 900 through the endless sub-zero desolation of snowbound Finland. Sleeping in bank vaults, imperial palaces and unreconstructed Soviet youth hostels, battling vodka-breathed Russian hostility, Romanian landslides and a diet of dumplings, Moore and his ‘so-small bicycle’ are sustained by the kindness of reindeer farmers and Serbian rock gods, plus a shameful addiction to Magic Man energy drink. Haunted throughout by the border detritus of watchtowers and rusted razor wire, Moore reflects on the curdling of the Communist dream, and the memories of a Cold War generation reared on the fear of apocalypse—at a time of renewed East-West tension. After three months, twenty countries and a fifty-eight degree jaunt up the thermostat, man and bike finally wobble up to a Black Sea beach in Bulgaria, older and wiser, but mainly older.

Tour de France

A Cultural History
Author: Christopher S. Thompson
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520934863
Category: Bicycle racing
Page: 406
View: 6002

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In this highly original history of the world's most famous bicycle race, Christopher S. Thompson, mining previously neglected sources and writing with infectious enthusiasm for his subject, tells the compelling story of the Tour de France from its creation in 1903 to the present. Weaving the words of racers, politicians, Tour organizers, and a host of other commentators together with a wide-ranging analysis of the culture surrounding the event including posters, songs, novels, films, and media coverage Thompson links the history of the Tour to key moments and themes in French history. Examining the enduring popularity of Tour racers, Thompson explores how their public images have changed over the past century. A new preface explores the long-standing problem of doping in light of recent scandals.

Tour De France For Dummies


Author: Phil Liggett,James Raia,Sammarye Lewis
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118070100
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 279
View: 7002

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A plain-English guide to the world's most famous-and grueling-bicycle race Featuring eight-pages of full-color photos from recent Tour de France races, this easy-to-follow, entertaining guide demystifies the history, strategy, rules, techniques, equipment, and competitors in what is arguably the most grueling and intriguing multiday, multistage sporting event in the world. Cowritten by the most popular English-speaking cycling commentator on the planet, this book is great reading for both experienced and the new bicycle racing fans alike.

Lanterne Rouge: The Last Man in the Tour de France


Author: Max Leonard
Publisher: Pegasus Books
ISBN: 1605987875
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 272
View: 5526

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A lively and entertaining history of the riders who have come in last place during the grueling 3,000-mile Tour de France Froome, Wiggins, Mercks—we know the winners of the Tour de France, but Lanterne Rouge tells the forgotten, often inspirational and occasionally absurd stories of the last-placed rider. We learn of stage winners and former yellow jerseys who tasted life at the other end of the bunch; the breakaway leader who stopped for a bottle of wine and then took a wrong turn; the doper whose drug cocktail accidentally slowed him down and the rider who was recognized as the most combative despite finishing at the back. Max Leonard flips the Tour de France on its head and examines what these stories tell us about ourselves, the 99% who don't win the trophy, and forces us to re-examine the meaning of success, failure and the very nature of sport.

Travels with My Donkey

One Man and His Ass on a Pilgrimage to Santiago
Author: Tim Moore
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 146687046X
Category: Travel
Page: 336
View: 6175

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"'A donkey?' blurted my family as one. For a moment it didn't seem they'd ever be able to list all the reasons that made this so entertainingly ludicrous. . . .Yes, I'd never ridden a donkey on a beach or petted one at a city farm, never even pinned a cardboard tail to one's throat after the cake and ice cream....A donkey would be my hairy-coated hair shirt, making my pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela a truer test of the will, a trial." With these words, having no knowledge of Spanish and even less about the care and feeding of donkeys, Tim Moore, Britain's indefatigable traveling Everyman, sets out on a pilgrimage to the cathedral at Santiago de Compostela with a donkey named Shinto as his companion. Armed only with the Codex Calixtinus, a twelfth-century handbook to the route, and expert advice on donkey management from Robert Louis Stevenson, Moore and his four-legged companion travel the ancient five-hundred-mile route from St. Jean Pied-de-Port, on the French side of the Pyrenees, to the cathedral at Santiago de Compostela, which houses the remains of Spain's patron saint, St. James. Over sun-scorched highways, precipitous bridges, dirt paths shaded by leafy trees, and vineyards occasionally lashed by downpours, Moore and Shinto pass through some of the oldest towns and cities in northern Spain in colorful company, both past and present. Pilgrims real and imagined have traveled this route throughout the ages, a diverse cast of wayfarers spanning Charlemagne, St. Francis of Assisi, Chaucer's Wife of Bath, and New Age diva, Shirley MacLaine. Moore's present-day companions are no less florid or poignant. Clearly more interested in Shinto than in Moore, their fellow walkers are an assortment of devout Christian pilgrims, New Age spirituality seekers, travelers grieving over a lost love affair, Baby Boomers contemplating the advent of middle age, and John Q. Public just out for a cheap, boozy sun-drenched outdoor holiday. As Moore pushes, pulls, wheedles, cajoles, and threatens Shinto across Spain toward the crypt of St. James in a quest to find the spiritual pilgrim within, the duo overnights in the bedrooms, dormitories, and---for Shinto---adjacent grassy fields of northern Spain's hostels, inns, convents, seminaries, and farmhouses. Shinto, a donkey with a finely honed talent for relieving himself at the most inopportune moments, has better luck in the search for his next meal than Moore does in finding his inner St. Francis. Undaunted, however, Man and Beast finally arrive at the cathedral and a successful end to their journey. For readers who delighted in his earlier books, Travels with My Donkey is the next hilarious chapter in the travels of Tim Moore, a book that keeps the bones of St. James rattling till this day.

The First Tour de France

Sixty Cyclists and Nineteen Days of Daring on the Road to Paris
Author: Peter Cossins
Publisher: Nation Books
ISBN: 1568589859
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 384
View: 343

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From its inception, the 1903 Tour de France was a colorful affair. Full of adventure, mishaps and audacious attempts at cheating, it was a race to be remembered. Cyclists of the time weren't enthusiastic about participating in this "heroic" race on roads more suited to hooves than wheels, with bikes weighing up to thirty-five pounds, on a single fixed gear, for three full weeks. Assembling enough riders for the race meant paying unemployed amateurs from the suburbs of Paris, including a butcher, a chimney sweep and a circus acrobat. From Maurice "The White Bulldog" Garin, an Italian-born Frenchman whose parents were said to have swapped him for a round of cheese in order to smuggle him into France as a fourteen-year-old, to Hippolyte Aucouturier, who looked like a villain from a Buster Keaton movie with his jersey of horizontal stripes and handlebar moustache, the cyclists were a remarkable bunch. Starting in the Parisian suburb of Montgeron, the route took the intrepid cyclists through Lyon, over the hills to Marseille, then on to Toulouse, Bordeaux, and Nantes, ending with great fanfare at the Parc des Princes in Paris. There was no indication that this ramshackle cycling pack would draw crowds to throng France's rutted roads and cheer the first Tour heroes. But they did; and all thanks to a marketing ruse, cycling would never be the same again.

The Escape Artist

Life from the Saddle
Author: Matt Seaton
Publisher: HarperCollins UK
ISBN: 1841151041
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 192
View: 620

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For a time there were four bikes in Matt Seaton's life, a training bike, a track bike, a mountain bike and a racing bike. His evenings were spent doing the miles on the roads between South London and the North Downs. Weekends were taken up with Club meetings, road races and time trials - rides that took him to cold village halls at dawn and out onto the empty bypasses of Southern England.

Under the French Blue Sky

Diary of a Grand Tour
Author: Nicole Marie Davison
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780692898871
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 2164

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The Tour de France is still very much a men's only bicycle race but that didn't stop this amateur cyclist from pursuing her dream of riding all 21 stages of the famous course one week before the professional peloton. She set off to discover the beauty of a country and sport that she loves and ended up discovering more about herself in the process

It's Not About the Bike

My Journey Back to Life
Author: Lance Armstrong
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780425179611
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 289
View: 3868

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The champion cyclist recounts his diagnosis with cancer, the grueling treatments during which he was given a less than twenty percent chance for survival, his surprising victory in the 1999 Tour de France, and the birth of his son.

The Invisible Mile

A Novel
Author: David Coventry
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1609453980
Category: Fiction
Page: 320
View: 4369

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A re-imagining of a true story, The Invisible Mile is a novel about the capacity of the human mind and body when stretched to their absolute limits, written in prose that calls to mind the works of Marilynne Robinson and John Banville, as well as Colson Whitehead’s National Book Award-winning novel The Underground Railroad. In 1928, the Ravat-Wonder cycling team became the first English-speaking peloton to compete in the Tour de France. The riders, from faraway New Zealand and Australia, were treated as exotics and isolated from their surroundings by a thick barrier of language and culture. Underfinanced and undertrained, the team faced one of the toughest routes in the race’s history, 5,476 kilometers over unsealed roads through a landscape heavy with the legacy of the Great War. 162 cyclists began the race that year, only 42 finished. A deeply introspective and spiritual book, The Invisible Mile is narrated by a fictional rider from the Ravat-Wonder team. Speaking no French and knowing a scant few of his fellow riders, his race becomes a confrontation with memories of the Great War and a quest to understand his own place amongst its history. He rides on the alternating highs of cocaine and opium, pain and pleasure, victory and defeat. And as he nears the northern battlefields and his last, invisible mile, trauma, exertion, and his personal demons take over. The Invisible Mile is the story of one man’s struggle for survival in the face of physical and psychological hardship, a profoundly human story about guilt and redemption.

The Rider


Author: Tim Krabbé,Tim Krabbe,Sam Garrett
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1582342903
Category: Fiction
Page: 160
View: 9363

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The classic bicycle road racing book first published in 1978 chronicles a 150-kilometer European road race and its competitors in vivid, realistic detail. Reprint.

Tour de France

The History, The Legend, The Riders
Author: Graeme Fife
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1780572085
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 592
View: 4320

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In this updated edition of the highly acclaimed Tour de France, Graeme Fife sets the 2015 race in the context of the event's remarkable history, which stretches back to July 1903. Named one of the top 5 sports books of the year by both the Times and the Independent, this meticulously researched guide has a pacy narrative which paints an irresistible portrait of this extraordinary competition and a colourful picture of the men who have given the Tour its enduring universal appeal. Tour de France : The History, The Legend, The Riders is laced with tales of great solo performances, amazing fortitude, terrible misfortune and magnificent triumphs, and will include the stories behind the headlines of the 2015 race.

The Tour de France

The Good, the bad and the just plain weird
Author: Hansford, Paul
Publisher: Hardie Grant Books
ISBN: 1743580398
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 192
View: 8773

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Take journey through The Tour de France – from chequered beginnings to glory days of rivalries and derring-do, and on to the brave new post-Armstrong world. Along the way, meet the larger-than-life personalities that have characterised the race throughout its history, along with their greatest and lowest moments. Peopled by cheats and charmers, through mudslides and melees, requiring equal measures of strength and sneakiness, the Tour de France is the greatest show on two wheels – and has been for over a century. Complete with a handy guide to cycling slang so you don’t crash-out halfway through your Tour-watching, this is a must-read for any seasoned rouleur or wet-behind-the-ears neo-pro. Covering legendary battles in the mountains to sabotage in the peloton, heart-warming cooperation between rivals to drug-addled accidental deaths, no side of this storied race goes unexplored. Paul Hansford has been a sports journalist for over 20 years. He is a contributor to most of the major sports magazines in Europe and is the former editor and regular contributor to FourFourTwo Magazine, the largest soccer magazine in Australia.

Wide-Eyed and Legless

Inside the Tour de France
Author: Jeff Connor
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1845968018
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 192
View: 2962

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A fast-paced, fly-on-the-wall story of courage, endurance, bungling, rows and cheating in sport's greatest marathon In 1987, the Tour de France was won by Irishman Stephen Roche. It was the first time the champion had hailed from outside the Continent or the States and the first time in 20 years a British team - ANC Halfords - had competed in the world's toughest and craziest race. Jeff Connor not only stayed with the British team but also found himself an unofficial team member. In this long-awaited new edition of Wide-Eyed and Legless, now widely regarded as a classic, Connor describes what it takes to compete, survive and win during those 26 days of gruelling effort. Alongside the heroism and athleticism, he reveals the extraordinary amounts of chicanery, from pulling riders along to illicit drug use. Time has not dimmed the impact of this eye-opening and entertaining close-up look at the supreme endurance event, and Wide-Eyed and Legless is destined to be acclaimed by a new generation of cycling enthusiasts. Jeff Connor's other books include the definitive story of the Busby Babes, The Lost Babes, and Up and Down Under, an account of the 2001 British Lions tour.

How I Won the Yellow Jumper

Dispatches from the Tour de France
Author: Ned Boulting
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 140904176X
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 416
View: 8588

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'Paris, 4 July 2003: My first Tour de France. I had never seen a bike race. I had only vaguely heard of Lance Armstrong. I had no idea what I was doing there. Yet, that day I was broadcasting live on television. I fumbled my way through a few platitudes, before summing up with the words, "...Dave Millar just missing out on the Yellow Jumper." Yes, the Yellow Jumper.' Follow Ned Boulting's (occasionally excruciating) experiences covering the world's most famous cycling race. His story offers an insider's view of what really goes on behind the scenes of the Tour. From up-close-and-personal encounters with Lance Armstrong to bewildered mishaps with the local cuisine, Ned's been there, done that and got the crumpled-looking t-shirt. Eight Tours on from Ned's humbling debut, he has grown to respect, mock, adore and crave the race in equal measure. What's more, he has even started to understand it. Includes How Cav Won the Green Jersey: Short Dispatches from the 2011 Tour de France

Slaying the Badger

LeMond, Hinault and the Greatest Ever Tour de France
Author: Richard Moore
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0224082914
Category: Cyclists
Page: 306
View: 6152

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Greg LeMond, 'L'Americain': fresh-faced, prodigious newcomer. This is supposed to be his year. Bernard Hinault, 'The Badger': aggressive, headstrong, five-time winner of the Tour. He has pledged his unwavering support to his team mate, LeMond. The team is everything in cycling, so the world watches, stunned, as LeMond and Hinault's explosive rivalry plays out over three high-octane weeks. Slaying the Badger relives the adrenaline and agony as LeMond battles to become the first American to win the Tour, with the Badger relentlessly on the attack. Includes brand new material for the paperback.

Chasing Lance

The 2005 Tour de France and Lance Armstrong's Ride of a Lifetime
Author: Martin Dugard
Publisher: Little, Brown
ISBN: 0316025577
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 256
View: 2208

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A unique combination of travelogue, humor, and insider cycling critique, "Chasing Lance" brings into focus the entire Tour de France experience. 8-page photo insert. 2 maps.

Tomorrow, We Ride--


Author: Jean Bobet
Publisher: Mousehold Press for Basque Children of '37 Association UK
ISBN: 9781874739517
Category: Cyclists
Page: 179
View: 2454

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An account of the lives of the Bobet brothers - Louison, triple Tour de France winner and Jean who gave up an academic career to ride in the service of his brother. This story brings alive the romance of the great races and star riders of those post war days whose exploits lifted the public spirit after years of conflict and economic hardship.