Fire in the Valley

The Birth and Death of the Personal Computer
Author: Michael Swaine,Paul Freiberger
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781937785765
Category: Computers
Page: 386
View: 9543

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In the 1970s, while their contemporaries were protesting the computer as a tool of dehumanization and oppression, a motley collection of college dropouts, hippies, and electronics fanatics were engaged in something much more subversive. Obsessed with the idea of getting computer power into their own hands, they launched from their garages a hobbyist movement that grew into an industry, and ultimately a social and technological revolution. What they did was invent the personal computer: not just a new device, but a watershed in the relationship between man and machine. This is their story. Fire in the Valley is the definitive history of the personal computer, drawn from interviews with the people who made it happen, written by two veteran computer writers who were there from the start. Working at InfoWorld in the early 1980s, Swaine and Freiberger daily rubbed elbows with people like Steve Jobs and Bill Gates when they were creating the personal computer revolution. A rich story of colorful individuals, Fire in the Valley profiles these unlikely revolutionaries and entrepreneurs, such as Ed Roberts of MITS, Lee Felsenstein at Processor Technology, and Jack Tramiel of Commodore, as well as Jobs and Gates in all the innocence of their formative years. This completely revised and expanded third edition brings the story to its completion, chronicling the end of the personal computer revolution and the beginning of the post-PC era. It covers the departure from the stage of major players with the deaths of Steve Jobs and Douglas Engelbart and the retirements of Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer; the shift away from the PC to the cloud and portable devices; and what the end of the PC era means for issues such as personal freedom and power, and open source vs. proprietary software.

Fire in the Valley

The Making of the Personal Computer
Author: Paul Freiberger,Michael Swaine
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Companies
ISBN: N.A
Category: Computers
Page: 463
View: 7049

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Traces the history of the personal computer industry, focusing on the individuals who developed new microcomputers and software, and created new computer companies.

Accidental Empires


Author: Robert X. Cringely
Publisher: HarperBusiness
ISBN: 9780887308550
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 384
View: 6877

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Computer manufacturing is--after cars, energy production and illegal drugs--the largest industry in the world, and it's one of the last great success stories in American business. Accidental Empires is the trenchant, vastly readable history of that industry, focusing as much on the astoundingly odd personalities at its core--Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Mitch Kapor, etc. and the hacker culture they spawned as it does on the remarkable technology they created. Cringely reveals the manias and foibles of these men (they are always men) with deadpan hilarity and cogently demonstrates how their neuroses have shaped the computer business. But Cringely gives us much more than high-tech voyeurism and insider gossip. From the birth of the transistor to the mid-life crisis of the computer industry, he spins a sweeping, uniquely American saga of creativity and ego that is at once uproarious, shocking and inspiring.

What the Dormouse Said

How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry
Author: John Markoff
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780143036760
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 310
View: 7181

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An analysis of the political and cultural forces that gave rise to the personal computer chronicles its development through the people, politics, and social upheavals that defined its time, from a teenage anti-war protester who laid the groundwork for the PC revolution to the imprisoned creator of the first word processing software for the IBM PC. Reprint.

Young Men and Fire

Twenty-fifth Anniversary Edition
Author: Norman Maclean
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022645049X
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 1658

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A devastating and lyrical work of nonfiction, Young Men and Fire describes the events of August 5, 1949, when a crew of fifteen of the US Forest Service’s elite airborne firefighters, the Smokejumpers, stepped into the sky above a remote forest fire in the Montana wilderness. Two hours after their jump, all but three of the men were dead or mortally burned. Haunted by these deaths for forty years, Norman Maclean puts together the scattered pieces of the Mann Gulch tragedy in Young Men and Fire, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award. Alongside Maclean’s now-canonical A River Runs through It and Other Stories, Young Men and Fire is recognized today as a classic of the American West. This twenty-fifth anniversary edition of Maclean’s later triumph—the last book he would write—includes a powerful new foreword by Timothy Egan, author of The Big Burn and The Worst Hard Time. As moving and profound as when it was first published, Young Men and Fire honors the literary legacy of a man who gave voice to an essential corner of the American soul.

Death in a Prairie House

Frank Lloyd Wright and the Taliesin Murders
Author: William R. Drennan
Publisher: Terrace Books
ISBN: 9780299222109
Category: Architecture
Page: 218
View: 9227

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A mystery story and authoritative portrait of the artist as a young man looks at the myths surrounding architect Frank Lloyd Wright, the brutal 1914 murders of seven adults and children, and the destruction by fire of Taliesin, his landmark residence in Wisconsin.

Of Mice and Men


Author: John Steinbeck
Publisher: Dramatists Play Service Inc
ISBN: 9780822208389
Category: Drama
Page: 71
View: 2132

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Presents a dramatization of the tragic story of a friendship between two migrant workers, George and Lenny, and their dream of owning a farm.

Troublemakers

Silicon Valley's Coming of Age
Author: Leslie Berlin
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
ISBN: 1451651511
Category: History
Page: 512
View: 8439

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Acclaimed historian Leslie Berlin’s “deeply researched and dramatic narrative of Silicon Valley’s early years…is a meticulously told…compelling history” (The New York Times) of the men and women who chased innovation, and ended up changing the world. Troublemakers is the gripping tale of seven exceptional men and women, pioneers of Silicon Valley in the 1970s and early 1980s. Together, they worked across generations, industries, and companies to bring technology from Pentagon offices and university laboratories to the rest of us. In doing so, they changed the world. “In this vigorous account…a sturdy, skillfully constructed work” (Kirkus Reviews), historian Leslie Berlin introduces the people and stories behind the birth of the Internet and the microprocessor, as well as Apple, Atari, Genentech, Xerox PARC, ROLM, ASK, and the iconic venture capital firms Sequoia Capital and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. In the space of only seven years, five major industries—personal computing, video games, biotechnology, modern venture capital, and advanced semiconductor logic—were born. “There is much to learn from Berlin’s account, particularly that Silicon Valley has long provided the backdrop where technology, elite education, institutional capital, and entrepreneurship collide with incredible force” (The Christian Science Monitor). Featured among well-known Silicon Valley innovators are Mike Markkula, the underappreciated chairman of Apple who owned one-third of the company; Bob Taylor, who masterminded the personal computer; software entrepreneur Sandra Kurtzig, the first woman to take a technology company public; Bob Swanson, the cofounder of Genentech; Al Alcorn, the Atari engineer behind the first successful video game; Fawn Alvarez, who rose from the factory line to the executive suite; and Niels Reimers, the Stanford administrator who changed how university innovations reach the public. Together, these troublemakers rewrote the rules and invented the future.

Revolution in The Valley

The Insanely Great Story of How the Mac Was Made
Author: Andy Hertzfeld,Steve Capps
Publisher: "O'Reilly Media, Inc."
ISBN: 0596007191
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 291
View: 6289

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Describes the development of the Apple Macintosh through a variety of anecdotes, photographs, and sketches.

The Valley

A Hundred Years in the Life of a Family
Author: Richard Benson
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1408834162
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 544
View: 909

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The close-knit villages of the Dearne Valley were home to four generations of the Hollingworth family. Spanning Richard Benson's great-grandmother Winnie's ninety-two years in the valley, and drawing on years of historical research, interviews and anecdotes, The Valley lets us into generations of carousing and banter as the family's attempts to build a better and fairer world for themselves meet sometimes with triumph, sometimes with bitter defeat. Against a backdrop of underground explosions, strikes and pit closures, these are unflinching, deeply personal stories of battles between the sexes in a man's world sustained by strong women; of growing up, and the power of love and imagination to transform lives.

Dies the Fire


Author: S. M. Stirling
Publisher: Roc
ISBN: N.A
Category: Fiction
Page: 483
View: 3038

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When a strange electrical storm over the island of Nantucket suddenly causes all electronic devices to cease to function, the world is faced with an unimaginable transformation.

Introduction to the History of Communication

Evolutions & Revolutions
Author: Terence P. Moran
Publisher: Peter Lang
ISBN: 9781433104121
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 382
View: 321

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"An Introduction to the History of Communication: Evolutions and Revolutions provides a comprehensive overview of how human communication has changed and is changing. Focusing on the evolutions and revolutions of six key changes in the history of communication---becoming human; creating writing; developing print; capturing the image; harnessing electricity; and exploring cybernetics---the author reveals how communication was generated, stored, and shared. This ecological approach provides a comprehensive understanding of the key variables that underlie each of these great evolutions-revolutions in human communication. Designed as an introduction for history of communication classes, the text examines the past, attempting to identify the key dynamics of change in these human, technical, semiotic, social, political, economic, and cultural structures, in order to better understand the present and prepare for possible future developments."--BOOK JACKET.

Tangled Vines

Greed, Murder, Obsession and an Arsonist in the Vineyards of California
Author: Frances Dinkelspiel
Publisher: Thorndike Press Large Print
ISBN: 9781410487315
Category: Cooking
Page: 487
View: 9207

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On October 12, 2005, a massive fire broke out in the Wines Central wine warehouse in Vallejo, California. Within hours, the flames had destroyed 4.5 million bottles of California's finest wine worth more than $250 million, making it the largest destruction of wine in history. The fire had been deliberately set by a passionate oenophile named Mark Anderson, a skilled con man and thief with storage space at the warehouse who needed to cover his tracks. With a propane torch and a bucket of gasoline-soaked rags, Anderson annihilated entire California vineyard libraries as well as bottles of some of the most sought-after wines in the world. Among the priceless bottles destroyed were 175 bottles of Port and Angelica from one of the oldest vineyards in California made by Frances Dinkelspiel's great-great grandfather, Isaias Hellman, in 1875. Sadly, Mark Anderson was not the first to harm the industry. The history of the California wine trade, dating back to the 19th Century, is a story of vineyards with dark and bloody pasts, tales of rich men, strangling monopolies, the brutal enslavement of vineyard workers and murder. Five of the wine trade murders were associated with Isaias Hellman's vineyard in Rancho Cucamonga beginning with the killing of John Rains who owned the land at the time. He was shot several times, dragged from a wagon and left off the main road for the coyotes to feed on. In her new book, Frances Dinkelspiel looks beneath the casually elegant veneer of California's wine regions to find the obsession, greed and violence lying in wait. Few people sipping a fine California Cabernet can even guess at the "Tangled Vines" where its life began.

Steve Jobs


Author: Walter Isaacson
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1451648545
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 630
View: 3211

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Draws on more than forty interviews with Steve Jobs, as well as interviews with family members, friends, competitors, and colleagues to offer a look at the co-founder and leading creative force behind the Apple computer company.

AI Superpowers

China, Silicon Valley, and the New World Order
Author: Kai-Fu Lee
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin
ISBN: 132854639X
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 272
View: 9516

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Introduction -- China's Sputnik moment -- Copycats in the Coliseum -- China's alternate Internet universe -- A tale of two countries -- The four waves of AI -- Utopia, dystopia, and the real AI crisis -- The wisdom of cancer -- A blueprint for human co-existence with AI -- Our global AI story

The Man Behind the Microchip

Robert Noyce and the Invention of Silicon Valley
Author: Leslie Berlin
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019531199X
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 402
View: 1554

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The triumphs and setbacks of inventor and entrepreneur Robert Noyce are illuminated in a biography that describes his colorful life in context of the evolution of the high-tech industry and the complex interrelationships among technology, business, big money, politics, and culture in Silicon Valley.

Into the Furnace

How a 135 Mile Run Across Death Valley Set My Soul on Fire
Author: Cory Reese
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781987711585
Category:
Page: 242
View: 6888

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When life turns up the heat, you have two choices. You can bend and break, or you can step boldly into the furnace and let your soul catch fire. Into The Furnace explores the inner workings of bravery, hope, and passion. These themes are framed against the backdrop of the Badwater Ultramarathon - a 135 mile race across the hottest place on the planet, Death Valley. Cory Reese has walked into the furnace. He has faced adversity, both in running and in life. His book captures the essence of what it means to suffer, what it means to persevere, and ultimately, what it means to create a life of clarity and purpose.

Valley of Genius

The Uncensored History of Silicon Valley (As Told by the Hackers, Founders, and Freaks Who Made It Boom)
Author: Adam Fisher
Publisher: Twelve
ISBN: 1455559016
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 400
View: 4383

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"This is the most important book on Silicon Valley I've read in two decades. It will take us all back to our roots in the counterculture, and will remind us of the true nature of the innovation process, before we tried to tame it with slogans and buzzwords." -- Po Bronson, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Nudist on the Late Shift and Nurtureshock A candid, colorful, and comprehensive oral history that reveals the secrets of Silicon Valley -- from the origins of Apple and Atari to the present day clashes of Google and Facebook, and all the start-ups and disruptions that happened along the way. Rarely has one economy asserted itself as swiftly--and as aggressively--as the entity we now know as Silicon Valley. Built with a seemingly permanent culture of reinvention, Silicon Valley does not fight change; it embraces it, and now powers the American economy and global innovation. So how did this omnipotent and ever-morphing place come to be? It was not by planning. It was, like many an empire before it, part luck, part timing, and part ambition. And part pure, unbridled genius... Drawing on over two hundred in-depth interviews, VALLEY OF GENIUS takes readers from the dawn of the personal computer and the internet, through the heyday of the web, up to the very moment when our current technological reality was invented. It interweaves accounts of invention and betrayal, overnight success and underground exploits, to tell the story of Silicon Valley like it has never been told before. Read it to discover the stories that Valley insiders tell each other: the tall tales that are all, improbably, true.

When Computing Got Personal

A History of the Desktop Computer
Author: Matt Nicholson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780992777418
Category: Computers
Page: 304
View: 9858

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This is the story of how a handful of geeks and mavericks dragged the computer out of corporate back rooms and laboratories and into our living rooms and offices. It is a tale not only of extraordinary innovation and vision but also of cunning business deals, boardroom tantrums and acrimonious lawsuits. Matt Nicholson has been a computer journalist since 1983 and has edited a number of popular newsstand magazines, including PC Plus and What Micro.

Places of Invention


Author: Arthur P. Molella,Anna Karvellas
Publisher: Smithsonian Institution
ISBN: 1935623680
Category: History
Page: 302
View: 1315

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Places of Invention is the companion book to a Smithsonian National Museum of American History exhibition of the same name. It seeks to answer important questions about the nature of invention and innovation- How do some places spark invention and innovation? How does "place"--whether physical, social, or cultural--support, constrain, and shape innovation? Why does invention flourish in one spot but struggle in another, even very similar, location? In short- Why there? Why then? This powerful volume explores the relationship between place and creativity throughout history. It features six key case studies- precision manufacturing in Hartford, CT in the late 1800s; Technicolor in Hollywood, CA in the 1930s; medical innovations in Medical Alley, MN in the 1950s; hip-hop's birth in the Bronx, NY in the 1970s; the rise of the personal computer in Silicon Valley, CA in the 1970s and 1980s; and clean-energy innovations in Fort Collins, CO in the 2010s. The lively and informative narrative from the exhibition's curators focuses on the central thesis that invention is everywhere and fueled by unique combinations of creative people, ready resources, and inspiring surroundings. Like the locations it explores, Places of Invention shows how the history of invention can be a transformative lens for understanding local history and cultivating creativity on scales of place ranging from the personal to the national and beyond.