Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool

A True Love Story
Author: Peter Turner
Publisher: Picador
ISBN: 1250136873
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 176
View: 8684

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Now a Major Motion Picture Starring Annette Bening, Jamie Bell, Julie Walters, and Vanessa Redgrave The Golden Age of Hollywood, a young British actor, a love affair, and a tragedy, Film Stars Don't Die In Liverpool is Peter Turner's touching memoir of the last days of Hollywood icon Gloria Grahame, the Oscar-winner best known for her portrayal of irresistible femme fatales in films such as The Big Heat, Oklahoma and The Bad and the Beautiful. The Hollywood Reporter calls the film adaptation "a tender, affecting romantic drama." On September 29, 1981, Peter Turner received a phone call that would change his life. His former lover, Hollywood actress Gloria Grahame, had collapsed in a Lancaster hotel and was refusing medical attention. He took her into his chaotic and often eccentric family’s home in Liverpool to see her through her last days. Though their affair had ended years before, it was to him that she turned in her final hour of need. Taking place over the course of three weeks in Turner’s larger-than-life working-class family home, Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool is an affectionate, moving, and wryly humorous memoir of friendship, love, and stardom.

Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool

A True Story
Author: Peter Turner
Publisher: Pan Macmillan
ISBN: 1509818227
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: N.A
View: 8558

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On 29 September 1981, Peter Turner received a phone call that would change his life. His former lover, Hollywood actress Gloria Grahame, had collapsed in a Lancaster hotel and was refusing medical attention. He had no choice but to take her into his chaotic and often eccentric family's home in Liverpool. Liverpool born and bred, Turner had first set eyes on Grahame when he was a young actor, living in London. Best known for her portrayal of irresistible femme fatales in films such as The Big Heat, Oklahoma and The Bad and the Beautiful, for which she won an Oscar, Grahame electrified audiences with her steely expressions and heavy lidded eyes and the heroines she bought to life were often dark and dangerous. Turner and Grahame became firm friends and remained so ever after their love affair had ended. And it was to him she turned in her final hour of need. Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool is an affectionate, moving and wryly humorous memoir of friendship, love and stardom.

Everything Is Cinema

The Working Life of Jean-Luc Godard
Author: Richard Brody
Publisher: Metropolitan Books
ISBN: 1429924314
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 720
View: 957

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A landmark biography explores the crucial resonances among the life, work, and times of one of the most influential filmmakers of our age When Jean-Luc Godard wed the ideals of filmmaking to the realities of autobiography and current events, he changed the nature of cinema. Unlike any earlier films, Godard's work shifts fluidly from fiction to documentary, from criticism to art. The man himself also projects shifting images—cultural hero, fierce loner, shrewd businessman. Hailed by filmmakers as a—if not the—key influence on cinema, Godard has entered the modern canon, a figure as mysterious as he is indispensable. In Everything Is Cinema, critic Richard Brody has amassed hundreds of interviews to demystify the elusive director and his work. Paying as much attention to Godard's technical inventions as to the political forces of the postwar world, Brody traces an arc from the director's early critical writing, through his popular success with Breathless, to the grand vision of his later years. He vividly depicts Godard's wealthy conservative family, his fluid politics, and his tumultuous dealings with women and fellow New Wave filmmakers. Everything Is Cinema confirms Godard's greatness and shows decisively that his films have left their mark on screens everywhere.

Gloria Grahame, Bad Girl of Film Noir

The Complete Career
Author: Robert J. Lentz
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786487224
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 366
View: 8479

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"This reference documents the film and television work of Academy Award-winning actress Gloria Grahame from the 1940s through her death in 1981."--Reference & Research Book News "Unquestionably important in terms of research...appropriately chosen film stills that perfectly capture the nature of the roles which Grahame played...successfully contemplates the changes in Hollywood and its audience."--O Filmu Noir V Cestine A marvelous actress, Gloria Grahame (1923-1981) was also an iconic figure of film noir. Her talents are showcased in several classic motion pictures of the 1940s and 1950s, including It's a Wonderful Life, Crossfire, In a Lonely Place, The Greatest Show on Earth, The Big Heat, Oklahoma!, and The Bad and the Beautiful, for which she earned an Academy Award. This comprehensive overview of Gloria Grahame's life and work examines each of her feature films in detail, as well as her made-for-television productions, her television-series appearances and her stage career. Also discussed are the varied ways in which Grahame's acting performances were affected by her tumultuous personal life--which included four marriages, the second to director Nicholas Ray and the fourth to Ray's stepson Anthony.

Suicide blonde

the life of Gloria Grahame
Author: Vincent Curcio
Publisher: William Morrow & Company
ISBN: N.A
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 319
View: 1462

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The life of Gloria Grahame offers a portrait of the Academy Award-winning actress who achieved enormous success in Hollywood until her notorious and shocking personal life sent her on a downward spiral to self-destruction

The Lovely Bones


Author: Alice Sebold
Publisher: Little, Brown
ISBN: 9780759527737
Category: Fiction
Page: 336
View: 7142

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Once in a generation a novel comes along that taps a vein of universal human experience, resonating with readers of all ages. The Lovely Bones is such a book - a phenomenal #1 bestseller celebrated at once for its narrative artistry, its luminous clarity of emotion, and its astoniishing power to lay claim to the hearts of millions of readers around the world. "My name was Salmon, like the fish; first name, Susie. I was fourteen when I was murdered on December 6, 1973." So begins the story of Susie Salmon, who is adjusting to her new home in heaven, a place that is not at all what she expected, even as she is watching life on eath continue without her - her friends trading rumors about her disappearance, her killer trying to cover his tracks, her grief-stricken family unraveling. Out of unspeakable traged and loss, The Lovely Bones succeeds, miraculously, in building a tale filled with hope, humor, suspense, even joy "A stunning achievement." -The New Yorker "Deeply affecting. . . . A keenly observed portrait of familial love and how it endures and changes over time." -New York Times "A triumphant novel. . . . It's a knockout." -Time "Destined to become a classic in the vein of To Kill a Mockingbird. . . . I loved it." -Anna Quindlen "A novel that is painfully fine and accomplished." -Los Angeles Times "The Lovely Bones seems to be saying there are more important things in life on earth than retribution. Like forgiveness, like love." -Chicago Tribune

Suite Francaise


Author: Irene Nemirovsky
Publisher: Vintage Canada
ISBN: 9780307371201
Category: Fiction
Page: 448
View: 704

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Suite Française is both a brilliant novel of wartime and an extraordinary historical document. An unmatched evocation of the exodus from Paris after the German invasion of 1940, and of life under the Nazi occupation, it was written by the esteemed French novelist Irène Némirovsky as events unfolded around her. This haunting masterpiece has been hailed by European critics as a War and Peace for the Second World War. Though she conceived the book as a five-part work (based on the form of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony), Irène Némirovsky was able to write only the first two parts, Storm in June and Dolce, before she was arrested in July 1942. She died in Auschwitz the following month. The manuscript was saved by her young daughter Denise; it was only decades later that Denise learned that what she had imagined was her mother’s journal was in fact an invaluable work of art. Storm in June takes place in the tumult of the evacuation from Paris in 1940, just before the arrival of the invading German army. It moves vividly between different levels of society–from the wealthy Péricand family, whose servants pack up their possessions for them, to a group of orphans from the 16th arrondissement escaping in a military truck. Némirovsky’s immense canvas includes deserting soldiers and terrified secretaries, cynical bank directors and hapless priests, egotistical writers and hardscrabble prostitutes–all thrown together in a chaotic attempt to escape the capital. Moving between them chapter by chapter, this thrilling novel describes a journey hampered and in some cases abandoned because of confusion, shelling, rumour, lack of supplies, bad luck and ordinary human weakness. Cars break down or are stolen; relatives are forgotten; friends are divided; but there are also moments of love and charity. Throughout, whether depicting saintly forbearance or the basest selfishness, Storm in June neither sweetens nor demonizes its characters; unsentimentally, with stunning perceptiveness, Némirovsky shows the complexities that mean no-one is simply a hero or villain. The second volume, Dolce, is set in the German-occupied village of Bussy. Again, Némirovsky switches seamlessly between social strata, from tenant farmers to the local aristocracy. The focus, however, is on the delicate, secret love affair between a German soldier and the French woman in whose house he has been billeted; the passion, doubts and deceits of their burgeoning relationship echo the complex mixture of hostility and acceptance felt by the occupied community as a whole. Némirovsky is amazingly sensitive in her depiction of changing, often contradictory emotions, but her attention to the personal is matched by her sharp-eyed discussion of small-town life and the politics of occupation. In this myth-dissolving book, the French villagers see the Germans as oppressive warriors, but also as handsome young men, and occupation does nothing to remedy the condescension and envy that bedevil relations between rich and poor. Quite apart from the astonishing story of its survival, Suite Française is a novel of genius and lasting artistic value. Subtle, often fiercely ironic, and deeply compassionate, it is both a piercing record of its time and a humane, profoundly moving novel. From the Hardcover edition.

The Rest Is Noise

Listening to the Twentieth Century
Author: Alex Ross
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 9781429932882
Category: History
Page: 640
View: 6958

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The scandal over modern music has not died down. While paintings by Pablo Picasso and Jackson Pollock sell for a hundred million dollars or more, shocking musical works from Stravinsky's Rite of Spring onward still send ripples of unease through audiences. At the same time, the influence of modern music can be felt everywhere. Avant-garde sounds populate the soundtracks of Hollywood thrillers. Minimalist music has had a huge effect on rock, pop, and dance music from the Velvet Underground onward. Alex Ross, the brilliant music critic for The New Yorker, shines a bright light on this secret world, and shows how it has pervaded every corner of twentieth century life. The Rest Is Noise takes the reader inside the labyrinth of modern sound. It tells of maverick personalities who have resisted the cult of the classical past, struggled against the indifference of a wide public, and defied the will of dictators. Whether they have charmed audiences with the purest beauty or battered them with the purest noise, composers have always been exuberantly of the present, defying the stereotype of classical music as a dying art. Ross, in this sweeping and dramatic narrative, takes us from Vienna before the First World War to Paris in the twenties, from Hitler's Germany and Stalin's Russia to downtown New York in the sixties and seventies. We follow the rise of mass culture and mass politics, of dramatic new technologies, of hot and cold wars, of experiments, revolutions, riots, and friendships forged and broken. In the tradition of Simon Schama's The Embarrassment of Riches and Louis Menand's The Metaphysical Club, the end result is not so much a history of twentieth-century music as a history of the twentieth century through its music.

Frank

The True Story That Inspired the Movie
Author: Jon Ronson
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698155572
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 32
View: 7047

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From the bestselling author of The Psychopath Test comes a characteristically humorous story of a musician on the margins. In Frank: The True Story that Inspired the Movie, Jon Ronson reflects on his days playing keyboard for the Frank Sidebottom Oh Blimey Big Band. Frank Sidebottom, best known for performing with a big fake head with a cartoon face painted on it, was a cult favorite in the United Kingdom and is the subject of the new movie Frank, co-written by Ronson and starring Michael Fassbender, Maggie Gyllenhaal, and Domhnall Gleeson.

The Haunting of Hill House


Author: Shirley Jackson
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 1443451118
Category: Fiction
Page: 180
View: 1344

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Luke Sanderson, inheritor of the mysterious Hill House, invites a supernatural investigator and several guests interested in the paranormal to his eighty-year-old mansion in the hopes that they can experience and record supernatural events. As time passes, the group experiences increasingly terrifying and unexplainable disturbances, and one guest—Eleanor Vance—seems to be a particular target of the strange occurrences. The Haunting of Hill House is one of the most famous ghost stories in literary history, and was a finalist for the National Book Award of 1959. Lauded by horror legends like Stephen King and named “the greatest haunted-house story ever written” by the Wall Street Journal, it has been adapted into films several times and served as a foundation for many modern ghost stories. HarperPerennial Classics brings great works of literature to life in digital format, upholding the highest standards in ebook production and celebrating reading in all its forms. Look for more titles in the HarperPerennial Classics collection to build your digital library.

The Jolly Roger Social Club

A True Story of a Killer in Paradise
Author: Nick Foster
Publisher: Gerald Duckworth & Co
ISBN: 0715651366
Category: True Crime
Page: 288
View: 7895

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The Jolly Roger Social Club is Nick Foster’s astonishing and vivid account of a man who may be the world’s first ‘capitalist’ serial killer. In the process of piecing together what happened, he sheds light on the bigger questions raised by Wild Bill’s actions: what was it that made Bocas del Toro such a fertile hunting ground for the murderer, and why did it take the expats so long to raise the alarm? The answer lies in the paradox of Panama itself – paradise with a sinister underbelly. Languishing in a Panamanian prison cell, William Holbert - known as ‘Wild Bill’ – is on trial for the murder of five fellow American expats. His first victims were the mysterious Brown family, who lived a deliberately quiet life in Panama’s remote province of Bocas del Toro. After killing the Browns, he turned their house into the Jolly Roger Social Club with the motto ‘Over 90% of our members survive’. He appointed himself Minister of the First Church of the Inebriation, and used drink and drug-fuelled parties to get close to others who, like him, had fled to Panama’s Caribbean coast in desperation to leave their past behind, assumed new identities and disappeared into a blissful loophole...

Walking to Listen

4,000 Miles Across America, One Story at a Time
Author: Andrew Forsthoefel
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1632867028
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 400
View: 2069

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A memoir of one young man's coming of age on a journey across America--told through the stories of the people of all ages, races, and inclinations he meets along the way. Life is fast, and I've found it's easy to confuse the miraculous for the mundane, so I'm slowing down, way down, in order to give my full presence to the extraordinary that infuses each moment and resides in every one of us. At 23, Andrew Forsthoefel headed out the back door of his home in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, with a backpack, an audio recorder, his copies of Whitman and Rilke, and a sign that read "Walking to Listen." He had just graduated from Middlebury College and was ready to begin his adult life, but he didn't know how. So he decided to take a cross-country quest for guidance, one where everyone he met would be his guide. In the year that followed, he faced an Appalachian winter and a Mojave summer. He met beasts inside: fear, loneliness, doubt. But he also encountered incredible kindness from strangers. Thousands shared their stories with him, sometimes confiding their prejudices, too. Often he didn't know how to respond. How to find unity in diversity? How to stay connected, even as fear works to tear us apart? He listened for answers to these questions, and to the existential questions every human must face, and began to find that the answer might be in listening itself. Ultimately, it's the stories of others living all along the roads of America that carry this journey and sing out in a hopeful, heartfelt book about how a life is made, and how our nation defines itself on the most human level.

Adrift

A True Story of Tragedy on the Icy Atlantic and the One Who Lived to Tell about It
Author: Brian Murphy
Publisher: Da Capo Press
ISBN: 0306901994
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 2852

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In the tradition of bestsellers such as Dead Wake and In the Heart of the Sea, Adrift tells of thirteen victims and a tragedy at sea where every desperate act could mean life or death The small ship making the Liverpool-to-New York trip in the early months of 1856 carried mail, crates of dry goods, and more than one hundred passengers, mostly Irish emigrants. Suddenly an iceberg tore the ship asunder and five lifeboats were lowered. As four lifeboats drifted into the fog and icy water, never to be heard from again, the last boat wrenched away from the sinking ship with a few blankets, some water and biscuits, and thirteen souls. Only one would survive. This is his story. As they started their nine days adrift more than four hundred miles off Newfoundland, the castaways--an Irish couple and their two boys, an English woman and her daughter, newlyweds from Ireland, and several crewmen, including Thomas W. Nye from Bedford, Massachusetts--began fighting over food and water. One by one, though, day by day, they died. Some from exposure, others from madness and panic. In the end, only Nye and his journal survived. Using Nye's journal and his later newspaper accounts, ship's logs, assorted diaries, and family archives, Brian Murphy chronicles the horrific nine days that thirteen people suffered adrift on the cold gray Atlantic sea. In the tradition of bestsellers such as Into Thin Air and In the Heart of the Sea, Adrift brings readers to the edge of human limits, where every frantic decision and every desperate act is a potential life saver or life taker.

PreparedU

How Innovative Colleges Drive Student Success
Author: Gloria Cordes Larson
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119402484
Category: Education
Page: 288
View: 6829

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How can we as parents, educators, and members of the business community prepare students to be successful leaders in today's global environment? It's a critically important question. Gloria Cordes Larson, president of Bentley University, explains why today's practices in higher education are inadequate preparation for our rapidly evolving innovation economy. Instead, she passionately advocates for a hybrid-learning model that integrates business education with traditional liberal arts courses. Today's businesses demand a new kind of hybrid graduate, possessed of both hard and soft skills, with the courage to take risks, the creativity to innovate, and the savvy to excel in a turbulent competitive climate. This book is a valuable resource for participants in every learning community: our homes, schools, and businesses. It will change the way you think about what excellence in education means in today's business environment as you develop strategies that will move our children, students, and future employees forward in a rapidly changing and very challenging world. Prepared with that training and knowledge, they will find greater fulfillment and make their own mark on the future.

Anyone Who Had a Heart

My Life and Music
Author: Burt Bacharach
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062206087
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 304
View: 7454

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In his memoir Anyone Who Had a Heart, Burt Bacharach, one of the greatest songwriters of all time, offers a frank and riveting account of his unparalleled life. From his tumultuous marriages and the tragic suicide of his daughter, to his collaborations with Hal David, Carole Bayer Sager, Neil Diamond, Elvis Costello, and others, Bacharach details his long-lasting success as well as the never-before-told stories behind the hits. Candid and emotional, and with 16 pages of color photographs, Anyone Who Had a Heart: My Life and Music is Burt Bacharach in his own words—a powerful and personal look at the award-winning songwriter and composer.

Odd Birds


Author: Ian Harding
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1250117089
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 320
View: 899

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A 7-time Teen Choice Award Winner on Freeform's most-watched series, Pretty Little Liars ... A social media influencer with over 7 million followers ... An avid birdwatcher? Yes, you read that correctly. Ian Harding is all of these things, and so much more. In this memoir, explore the unexpected world of a young celebrity through the lens of his favorite pastime — birding. Odd Birds is more than just a Hollywood memoir or tell-all. At its heart, this book is a coming-of-age story in which Ian wrestles with an ever evolving question— how can he still be himself, while also being a celebrity. Each humorous and heartfelt story features a particular bird—sometimes literal, at other times figurative. Using this framework, Ian explores a variety of topics, including growing up, life as a television actor and nature lover, and whether it is better to shave or wax one’s chest for an on-screen love scene. A funny and heartwarming window into Ian’s life, Odd Birds is a must-read for fans of nature writing and memoir alike.

The Man who Came to Dinner

Comedy in Three Acts
Author: Moss Hart,George Simon Kaufman
Publisher: Dramatists Play Service Inc
ISBN: 9780822207252
Category: Drama
Page: 88
View: 9023

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A radio celebrity and his secretary have dinner with a Midwestern family, and end up staying as a disruptive force when he breaks his hip and has to stay to recuperate.

Warner Bros

The Making of an American Movie Studio
Author: David Thomson
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300231334
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 232
View: 5169

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Behind the scenes at the legendary Warner Brothers film studio, where four immigrant brothers transformed themselves into the moguls and masters of American fantasy Warner Bros charts the rise of an unpromising film studio from its shaky beginnings in the early twentieth century through its ascent to the pinnacle of Hollywood influence and popularity. The Warner Brothers—Harry, Albert, Sam, and Jack—arrived in America as unschooled Jewish immigrants, yet they founded a studio that became the smartest, toughest, and most radical in all of Hollywood. David Thomson provides fascinating and original interpretations of Warner Brothers pictures from the pioneering talkie The Jazz Singer through black-and-white musicals, gangster movies, and such dramatic romances as Casablanca, East of Eden, and Bonnie and Clyde. He recounts the storied exploits of the studio’s larger-than-life stars, among them Al Jolson, James Cagney, Bette Davis, Errol Flynn, Humphrey Bogart, James Dean, Doris Day, and Bugs Bunny. The Warner brothers’ cultural impact was so profound, Thomson writes, that their studio became “one of the enterprises that helped us see there might be an American dream out there.”

The Children Act


Author: Ian McEwan
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 0385539711
Category: Fiction
Page: 240
View: 6367

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Fiona Maye is a leading High Court judge who presides over cases in the family court. She is renowned for her fierce intelligence, exactitude, and sensitivity. But her professional success belies private sorrow and domestic strife. There is the lingering regret of her childlessness, and now her marriage of thirty years is in crisis. At the same time, she is called on to try an urgent case: Adam, a beautiful seventeen-year-old boy, is refusing for religious reasons the medical treatment that could save his life, and his devout parents echo his wishes. Time is running out. Should the secular court overrule sincerely expressed faith? In the course of reaching a decision, Fiona visits Adam in the hospital—an encounter that stirs long-buried feelings in her and powerful new emotions in the boy. Her judgment has momentous consequences for them both.