Famous Trials in History


Author: Elisabeth A. Cawthon
Publisher: Facts on File
ISBN: 9780816081677
Category: History
Page: 463
View: 5333

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"Famous Trials in History collects 100 significant legal trials from time periods and places ranging from Socrates in classical Greece and Joan of Arc in medieval France to Saddam Hussein in modern Iraq. Each entry includes the trial's key issues, a history of the case, a summary of arguments, the verdict, the significance of the case, and readings for further study."--P. [4] of cover.

Famous Trials of History 1926


Author: Frederick E. Birkenhead
Publisher: Kessinger Publishing
ISBN: 9780766161672
Category: Law
Page: 316
View: 907

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1926. This book contains some trials in which the author was himself engaged for which it cannot be claimed that they fall into the category of "famous". The treatment of the cases is untechnical throughout, so that the narratives may easily be comprehended by laymen. They belong to very different periods of English history, some of which are now remote and curious. One of the greatest lawyers of all time gives the reader the inside history of many famous trials. These stories are among the most dramatic and fascinating in the world, and includes such trials as: trial of Mary Queen of Scots, trial of Deacon Brodie, man who stole the king's crown, frauds of the Bank of Liverpool, and many others.

Famous Trials

Cases that made history
Author: Frank McLynn
Publisher: Crux Publishing Ltd
ISBN: 1909979449
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 6972

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A wonderful summary of famous trials throughout history, from Jesus Christ to Oscar Wilde

Political Trials in History

From Antiquity to the Present
Author: Ron Christenson
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
ISBN: 9781412831253
Category: Law
Page: 528
View: 1704

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Prepared in dictionary format, this volume reexamines the uses of political trials. Through the conduct and context of key trials throughout history, the reader is made to understand an aspect of public life too easily misconstrued, although never neglected: the political side of litigation. Most of the trials in this volume were significant enough to continue to shape our interpretation of the law long after the court made its judgment and all appeals were completed. The dialogue they initiated may last for decades, even for centuries. Such trials provide us with an insight into the vital aspects of our public life, the civilizing capacity of politics.

The Mammoth Book of Famous Trials


Author: Roger Wilkes
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 1780333722
Category: True Crime
Page: 512
View: 7649

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The 35 most famous trials of the 20th century, as recorded by the people who were there including Truman Capote, Norman Mailer, Brian Masters, Damon Runyon and other star turns in true crime writing. Among the cases featured: the longest ever US trial, of deadly duo Bianchi and Buono for the Hillside Stranglings of 12 young women; Brady and Hindley - the iconic case of multiple child murder by a couple obsessed with sadism, Nazism and pornography; America's trial of the 1990s - O.J. Simpson; the media frenzy around Bruno Hauptmann's alleged kidnap and murder of the infant son of American hero, Charles Lindbergh; gagged press during the 1968 trial of eleven-year-old Mary Bell, convicted for killing two little boys; Oscar Wilde - one of the earliest trials to earn blanket press coverage; and the nine-month trial of 'one of the most evil, satanic men who ever walked the face of the earth', Charles Manson.

Famous trials of Marshall Hall


Author: Edward Marjoribanks
Publisher: Penguin Group USA
ISBN: N.A
Category: Law
Page: 405
View: 7846

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Traces the life and career of British barrister Sir Edward Marshall Hall and recounts many of his dramatic trials in the late nineteeth century and early twentieth century.

Helter Skelter: The True Story of the Manson Murders


Author: Vincent Bugliosi,Curt Gentry
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393322238
Category: True Crime
Page: 687
View: 5052

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The inside story behind the Manson killings explains how Charles Manson was able to make his "family" murder for him, chronicles the investigation, and describes in detail the court trial that brought him and his accomplices to justice. Winner of the Edgar Allan Poe Award. Reprint.

Summoned to the Roman Courts

Famous Trials from Antiquity
Author: Detlef Liebs,Rebecca L.R. Garber
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520259629
Category: History
Page: 274
View: 5540

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“This book covers sixteen ‘famous trials’—some familiar to readers with a classical background, others less well known—all of which shed light on uncommon aspects of social and legal history. Liebs draws attention to two important but relatively understudied issues in particular: the role of the judge in procedure and the significance of trials and their outcomes in the evolution of Roman law.”—Jill D. Harries, Professor of Ancient History, University of St Andrews, and author of Cicero and the Jurists.

The Trial

Four Thousand Years of Courtroom Drama
Author: Sadakat Kadri
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 030743270X
Category: Law
Page: 480
View: 2081

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For as long as accuser and accused have faced each other in public, criminal trials have been establishing far more than who did what to whom–and in this fascinating book, Sadakat Kadri surveys four thousand years of courtroom drama. A brilliantly engaging writer, Kadri journeys from the silence of ancient Egypt’s Hall of the Dead to the clamor of twenty-first-century Hollywood to show how emotion and fear have inspired Western notions of justice–and the extent to which they still riddle its trials today. He explains, for example, how the jury emerged in medieval England from trials by fire and water, in which validations of vengeance were presumed to be divinely supervised, and how delusions identical to those that once sent witches to the stake were revived as accusations of Satanic child abuse during the 1980s. Lifting the lid on a particularly bizarre niche of legal history, Kadri tells how European lawyers once prosecuted animals, objects, and corpses–and argues that the same instinctive urge to punish is still apparent when a child or mentally ill defendant is accused of sufficiently heinous crimes. But Kadri’s history is about aspiration as well as ignorance. He shows how principles such as the right to silence and the right to confront witnesses, hallmarks of due process guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution, were derived from the Bible by twelfth-century monks. He tells of show trials from Tudor England to Stalin’s Soviet Union, but contends that “no-trials,” in Guantánamo Bay and elsewhere, are just as repugnant to Western traditions of justice and fairness. With governments everywhere eroding legal protections in the name of an indefinite war on terror, Kadri’s analysis could hardly be timelier. At once encyclopedic and entertaining, comprehensive and colorful, The Trial rewards curiosity and an appreciation of the absurd but tackles as well questions that are profound. Who has the right to judge, and why? What did past civilizations hope to achieve through scapegoats and sacrifices–and to what extent are defendants still made to bear the sins of society at large? Kadri addresses such themes through scores of meticulously researched stories, all told with the verve and wit that won him one of Britain’s most prestigious travel-writing awards–and in doing so, he has created a masterpiece of popular history. From the Hardcover edition.

America on Trial

Inside the Legal Battles That Transformed Our Nation
Author: Alan M. Dershowitz
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
ISBN: 0759511039
Category: Law
Page: 608
View: 3936

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The renowned attorney and bestselling author reveals how notable trials throughout our history have helped to shape our nation. Offering insights into the human condition, these trials serve as a historical document, chronicling the struggles and passions of their time.

Thomas More's Trial by Jury

A Procedural and Legal Review with a Collection of Documents
Author: Henry Ansgar Kelly,Louis W. Karlin,Louis J. Karlin,Gerard Wegemer
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd
ISBN: 1843836297
Category: Law
Page: 240
View: 4808

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This book challenges the recently established consensus that the trial was a carefully prepared and executed judicial process in which the judges were amenable to reasonable arguments.

Famous Trials of History


Author: Earl Of Birkenhead
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781494082109
Category:
Page: 318
View: 6057

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This is a new release of the original 1926 edition.

Famous Trials of History


Author: Anonymous
Publisher: Sagwan Press
ISBN: 9781340089825
Category:
Page: 326
View: 7774

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This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Trials of the Century

A Decade-by-Decade Look at Ten of America's Most Sensational Crimes
Author: Mark J. Phillips,Aryn Z. Phillips
Publisher: Prometheus Books
ISBN: 1633881962
Category: True Crime
Page: 340
View: 8814

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In every decade of the twentieth century, there was one sensational murder trial that riveted public attention and at the time was called "the trial of the century." This book tells the story of each murder case and the dramatic trial—and media coverage—that followed. Starting with the murder of famed architect Stanford White in 1906 and ending with the O.J. Simpson trial of 1994, the authors recount ten compelling tales spanning the century. Each is a story of celebrity and sex, prejudice and heartbreak, and all reveal how often the arc of American justice is pushed out of its trajectory by an insatiable media driven to sell copy. The most noteworthy cases are here--including the Lindbergh baby kidnapping, the Sam Sheppard murder trial ("The Fugitive"), the "Helter Skelter" murders of Charles Manson, and the O.J. Simpson murder trial. But some cases that today are lesser known also provide fascinating glimpses into the tenor of the time: the media sensation created by yellow journalist William Randolph Hearst around the murder trial of 1920s movie star Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle; the murder of the Scarsdale Diet guru by an elite prep-school headmistress in the 1980s; and more. The authors conclude with an epilogue on the infamous Casey Anthony (“tot mom”)trial, showing that the twenty-first century is as prone to sensationalism as the last century. This is a fascinating history of true crime, justice gone awry, and the media often at its worst. From the Hardcover edition.

Famous Trials of History


Author: F. E. Smith
Publisher: Wildside Press LLC
ISBN: 1434421384
Category: Fiction
Page: 320
View: 4101

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Frederick Edwin Smith, 1st Earl of Birkenhead (1872-1930) was a lawyer and Conservative politician, and a great personal friend of Winston Churchill's.

Lincoln's Last Trial: The Murder Case That Propelled Him to the Presidency


Author: Dan Abrams,David Fisher
Publisher: Harlequin
ISBN: 1488095329
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 320
View: 1239

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Instant New York Times bestseller! A USA Today Top 10 Hot Book for Summer “Makes you feel as if you are watching a live camera riveted on a courtroom more than 150 years ago.” —Diane Sawyer The true story of Abraham Lincoln’s last murder trial, a case in which he had a deep personal involvement—and which played out in the nation’s newspapers as he began his presidential campaign At the end of the summer of 1859, twenty-two-year-old Peachy Quinn Harrison went on trial for murder in Springfield, Illinois. Abraham Lincoln, who had been involved in more than three thousand cases—including more than twenty-five murder trials—during his two-decades-long career, was hired to defend him. This was to be his last great case as a lawyer. What normally would have been a local case took on momentous meaning. Lincoln’s debates with Senator Stephen Douglas the previous fall had gained him a national following, transforming the little-known, self-taught lawyer into a respected politician. He was being urged to make a dark-horse run for the presidency in 1860. Taking this case involved great risk. His reputation was untarnished, but should he lose this trial, should Harrison be convicted of murder, the spotlight now focused so brightly on him might be dimmed. He had won his most recent murder trial with a daring and dramatic maneuver that had become a local legend, but another had ended with his client dangling from the end of a rope. The case posed painful personal challenges for Lincoln. The murder victim had trained for the law in his office, and Lincoln had been his friend and his mentor. His accused killer, the young man Lincoln would defend, was the son of a close friend and loyal supporter. And to win this trial he would have to form an unholy allegiance with a longtime enemy, a revivalist preacher he had twice run against for political office—and who had bitterly slandered Lincoln as an “infidel…too lacking in faith” to be elected. Lincoln’s Last Trial captures the presidential hopeful’s dramatic courtroom confrontations in vivid detail as he fights for his client—but also for his own blossoming political future. It is a moment in history that shines a light on our legal system, as in this case Lincoln fought a legal battle that remains incredibly relevant today.

Judicial Tribunals in England and Europe, 1200-1700

The Trial in History
Author: Maureen Mulholland,Brian Pullan
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0719063434
Category: History
Page: 200
View: 9371

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Now available in paperback for the first time, this book examines trials, civil and criminal, ecclesiastical and secular, in England and Europe between the thirteenth and the seventeenth centuries. Chapters consider the judges and juries and the amateur and professional advisers involved in legal processes as well as the offenders brought before the courts, with the reasons for prosecuting them and the defenses they put forward. The cases examined range from a fourteenth century cause-célèbre, the attempted trial of Pope Boniface VIII for heresy, to investigations of obscure people for sexual and religious offenses in the city states of Geneva and Venice. Technical terms have been cut to a minimum to ensure accessibility and appeal to lawyers, social, political, and legal historians, undergraduate and postgraduates as well as general readers interested in the development of the trial through time.