Evolution and Prehistory: The Human Challenge


Author: William Haviland,Dana Walrath,Harald Prins,Bunny McBride
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1285061411
Category: Social Science
Page: 400
View: 3503

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Offering compelling photos, engaging examples, and select studies by anthropologists in a variety of locations around the globe, Haviland, Walrath, Prins and McBride present evolution and prehistory in vivid, accessible terms, and demonstrate how the field is relevant to understanding the complex world around you. You’ll have the opportunity to explore the different ways humans face the challenge of existence; learn about the connection between biology and culture in the course of human evolutionary history as well as in shaping contemporary human biology, beliefs, and behavior; and see the impact of globalization on the continued survival of our species and planet. Available with InfoTrac Student Collections http://gocengage.com/infotrac. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Human Evolution and Prehistory


Author: William A. Haviland
Publisher: Thomson
ISBN: 9780534610159
Category:
Page: N.A
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This is a brief text that offers a straightforward, balance presentation on views of human evolution, adaptation, and prehistory. It focuses on selected aspects of physical anthropology and prehistoric archaeology as they relate to the origin of humanity, the origin of culture, and the development of human biological and cultural diversity. Haviland's commitment to challenging student ethnocentrism is continued and reinforced in this new edition.

The Human Challenge


Author: William A. Haviland,Harald E. L. Prins,Dana Walrath,Bunny McBride
Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing Company
ISBN: 9780534610104
Category: Social Science
Page: 448
View: 1379

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EVOLUTION AND PREHISTORY has been completely revolutionized to present students with the latest contemporary thinking on human evolution, adaptation, and prehistory and offers the same great coverage as the paperbound version at a significantly lower price. It offers students a straightforward and integrated presentation of material, focusing on selected aspects of physical anthropology and prehistoric archaeology as they relate to the origin of humanity, the origin of culture, and the development of human biological and cultural diversity. A New feature entitled "Biocultural Connections" illustrates how cultural and biological processes work together to shape human evolution and behavior, and reflects where the field is today. New coverage on cutting edge topics such as medical anthropology, genetics, environmental toxins, and globalization, demonstrate the usefulness of anthropology today. A new, unique "Epilogue" looks at cultural disease and globalization.

Anthropology

The Human Challenge
Author: William A. Haviland,Harald E. L. Prins,Dana Walrath,Bunny McBride
Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing Company
ISBN: 9780840033314
Category: Social Science
Page: 784
View: 1721

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This book offers a comprehensive and balanced presentation on views of human culture, evolution, and prehistory. The text presents the principles and processes of anthropology, both physical (biological) and cultural, including ethnology, linguistics, and prehistoric archaeology in an integrated, holistic manner. The book's framework emphasizing the challenge of human survival, the connections between biology and culture, and the impact of globalization on peoples and cultures around the world, serves to unify the material. The authors integrate contemporary research and ideas from several schools of thought, and use a lively writing style to engage readers and keep them interested in "real world" anthropology.

Evolution for Everyone

How Darwin's Theory Can Change the Way We Think About Our Lives
Author: David Sloan Wilson
Publisher: Delacorte Press
ISBN: 0440336805
Category: Science
Page: 400
View: 5029

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What is the biological reason for gossip? For laughter? For the creation of art? Why do dogs have curly tails? What can microbes tell us about morality? These and many other questions are tackled by renowned evolutionist David Sloan Wilson in this witty and groundbreaking new book. With stories that entertain as much as they inform, Wilson outlines the basic principles of evolution and shows how, properly understood, they can illuminate the length and breadth of creation, from the origin of life to the nature of religion. Now everyone can move beyond the sterile debates about creationism and intelligent design to share Darwin’s panoramic view of animal and human life, seamlessly connected to each other. Evolution, as Wilson explains, is not just about dinosaurs and human origins, but about why all species behave as they do—from beetles that devour their own young, to bees that function as a collective brain, to dogs that are smarter in some respects than our closest ape relatives. And basic evolutionary principles are also the foundation for humanity’s capacity for symbolic thought, culture, and morality. In example after example, Wilson sheds new light on Darwin’s grand theory and how it can be applied to daily life. By turns thoughtful, provocative, and daringly funny, Evolution for Everyone addresses some of the deepest philosophical and social issues of this or any age. In helping us come to a deeper understanding of human beings and our place in the world, it might also help us to improve that world. From the Hardcover edition.

How Things Shape the Mind


Author: Lambros Malafouris
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262019191
Category: Psychology
Page: 304
View: 9584

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An account of the different ways in which things have become cognitive extensions of the human body, from prehistory to the present.

War, Peace, and Human Nature

The Convergence of Evolutionary and Cultural Views
Author: Douglas P. Fry
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190232463
Category: Social Science
Page: 584
View: 1454

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Have humans always waged war? Is warring an ancient evolutionary adaptation or a relatively recent behavior--and what does that tell us about human nature? In War, Peace, and Human Nature, editor Douglas P. Fry brings together leading experts in such fields as evolutionary biology, archaeology, anthropology, and primatology to answer fundamental questions about peace, conflict, and human nature in an evolutionary context. The chapters in this book demonstrate that humans clearly have the capacity to make war, but since war is absent in some cultures, it cannot be viewed as a human universal. And counter to frequent presumption the actual archaeological record reveals the recent emergence of war. It does not typify the ancestral type of human society, the nomadic forager band, and contrary to widespread assumptions, there is little support for the idea that war is ancient or an evolved adaptation. Views of human nature as inherently warlike stem not from the facts but from cultural views embedded in Western thinking. Drawing upon evolutionary and ecological models; the archaeological record of the origins of war; nomadic forager societies past and present; the value and limitations of primate analogies; and the evolution of agonism, including restraint; the chapters in this interdisciplinary volume refute many popular generalizations and effectively bring scientific objectivity to the culturally and historically controversial subjects of war, peace, and human nature.

Conceiving God: The Cognitive Origin and Evolution of Religion


Author: David Lewis-Williams
Publisher: Thames & Hudson
ISBN: 0500770433
Category: Religion
Page: 320
View: 7744

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A controversial exploration of the origin of religion in the neurology of the human brain. In this book the noted cognitive archaeologist David Lewis-Williams confronts a question that troubles many people in the world today: Is there a supernatural realm that intervenes in the material world of daily life and leads to the evolution of religions? Professor Lewis-Williams first describes how science developed within the cocoon of religion and then shows how the natural functioning of the human brain creates experiences that can lead to belief in a supernatural realm, beings, and interventions. Once people have these experiences, they formulate beliefs about them, and thus creeds are born. Forty thousand years ago, people were leaving traces in the archaeological record of activities that we can label religious, and Lewis-Williams discusses in detail the evidence preserved in the Volp Caves in France. He also shows that mental imagery produced by the functioning of the human brain can be detected in widely separated religious communities such as Hildegard of Bingen’s in medieval Europe or the San hunters of southern Africa.

Bang!

How We Came to Be
Author: Michael Rubino
Publisher: Prometheus Books
ISBN: 1616144734
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 69
View: 7668

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"Bang! And that was it, the beginning of everything." So begins this beautifully illustrated, panoramic story of evolution. Author and illustrator Michael Rubino conveys not only the facts but also the excitement of the scientific explanation of our world, from the origin of the universe in the big bang to the present reality of our planet, teeming with life but threatened by overpopulation and pollution. Parents looking for an easy-to-understand guide to the scientific worldview for their children will find the perfect source here. The formation of stars and galaxies; the origin of our solar system and planet Earth; the epochal march of life from single-celled organisms through sponges, worms, insects, fish, dinosaurs, birds, and early mammals; and the evolution of the first humans from their simian cousins—it’s all here. This book is an eloquent blend of art and science that tells the most important story so far known. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Creativity in Human Evolution and Prehistory


Author: Steven Mithen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134720122
Category: Social Science
Page: 312
View: 3737

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We live in a world surrounded by remarkable cultural achievements of human kind. Almost every day we hear of new innovations in technology, in medicine and in the arts which remind us that humans are capable of remarkable creativity. But what is human creativity? The modern world provides a tiny fraction of cultural diversity and the evidence for human creativity, far more can be seen by looking back into prehistory. The book examines how our understanding of human creativity can be extended by exploring this phenomenon during human evolution and prehistory. The book offers unique perspectives on the nature of human creativity from archaeologists who are concerned with long term patterns of cultural change and have access to quite different types of human behaviour than that which exists today. It asks whether humans are the only creative species, or whether our extinct relatives such as Homo habilis and the Neanderthals also displayed creative thinking. It explores what we can learn about the nature of human creativity from cultural developments during prehistory, such as changes in the manner in which the dead were buried, monuments constructed, and the natural world exploited. In doing so, new light is thrown on these cultural developments and the behaviour of our prehistoric ancestors. By examining the nature of creativity during human evolution and prehistory these archaeologists, supported by contributions from psychology, computer science and social anthropology, show that human creativity is a far more diverse and complex phenomena than simply flashes of genius by isolated individuals. Indeed they show that unless perspectives from prehistory are taken into account, our understanding of human creativity will be limited and incomplete.

Myths of the Archaic State

Evolution of the Earliest Cities, States, and Civilizations
Author: Norman Yoffee
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521521567
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 277
View: 5578

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Classical archaeology promotes the view that a state's evolution reflects general, universal forces. Norman Yoffee challenges the model in this book by presenting more complex and multi-linear models for the evolution of civilizations. Yoffee questions the definition of the prehistoric state, particularly that which heralds "the chiefdom" as the forerunner of the ancient state and explores case studies on the role of women in ancient societies.

Darwin's Unfinished Symphony

How Culture Made the Human Mind
Author: Kevin N. Laland
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 069118447X
Category: Science
Page: N.A
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Humans possess an extraordinary capacity for culture, from the arts and language to science and technology. But how did the human mind—and the uniquely human ability to devise and transmit culture—evolve from its roots in animal behavior? Darwin’s Unfinished Symphony presents a captivating new theory of human cognitive evolution. This compelling and accessible book reveals how culture is not just the magnificent end product of an evolutionary process that produced a species unlike all others—it is also the key driving force behind that process. Kevin Laland tells the story of the painstaking fieldwork, the key experiments, the false leads, and the stunning scientific breakthroughs that led to this new understanding of how culture transformed human evolution. It is the story of how Darwin’s intellectual descendants picked up where he left off and took up the challenge of providing a scientific account of the evolution of the human mind.

Sex at Dawn

How We Mate, Why We Stray, and What It Means for Modern Relationships
Author: Christopher Ryan,Cacilda Jetha
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0061707813
Category: Social Science
Page: 432
View: 9686

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In this controversial, thought-provoking, and brilliant book, renegade thinkers Christopher Ryan and Cacilda JethÁ debunk almost everything we “know” about sex, weaving together convergent, frequently overlooked evidence from anthropology, archaeology, primatology, anatomy, and psychosexuality to show how far from human nature monogamy really is. In Sex at Dawn, the authors expose the ancient roots of human sexuality while pointing toward a more optimistic future illuminated by our innate capacities for love, cooperation, and generosity.

Beyond War

The Human Potential for Peace
Author: Douglas P. Fry
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019538461X
Category: Political Science
Page: 331
View: 3061

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A profoundly heartening view of human nature, Beyond War offers a hopeful prognosis for a future without war. Douglas P. Fry convincingly argues that our ancient ancestors were not innately warlike--and neither are we. He points out that, for perhaps ninety-nine percent of our history, for well over a million years, humans lived in nomadic hunter-and-gatherer groups, egalitarian bands where warfare was a rarity. Drawing on archaeology and fascinating recent fieldwork on hunter-gatherer bands from around the world, Fry debunks the idea that war is ancient and inevitable. For instance, among Aboriginal Australians, warfare was an extreme anomaly. Fry also points out that even today, when war seems ever present, the vast majority of us live peaceful, nonviolent lives. We are not as warlike as we think, and if we can learn from our ancestors, we may be able to move beyond war to provide real justice and security for the world.

Before The Dawn


Author: Nicholas Wade
Publisher: Gerald Duckworth & Co
ISBN: 071564209X
Category: Science
Page: 320
View: 9569

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When did language emerge? How did our ancestors break out of Africa and defeat the more physically powerful Neanderthals? How did human nature change in the 35,000 years between the emergence of fully modern humans and the first settlements? In the last three years a flood of new scientific findings driven by revelations discovered in the human genome has provided compelling new answers to many long-standing mysteries about our ancient ancestors. Nicholas Wade takes readers to the forefront of research in a sweeping and engrossing narrative, the first to reveal how genetic discoveries are helping to weave together the perspectives of archaeology, palaeontology, anthropology, linguistics, and many other fields. Before the Dawn marks a major advance in our understanding of human nature and origins.

Ancient Lives

An Introduction to Archaeology and Prehistory
Author: Dr. Brian Fagan
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317281950
Category: Social Science
Page: 588
View: 6572

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Focusing on sites of key significance and the world’s first civilizations, Ancient Lives is an accessible and engaging textbook which introduces complete beginners to the fascinating worlds of archaeology and prehistory. Drawing on their impressive combined experience of the field and the classroom, the authors use a jargon-free narrative style to enliven the major developments of more than three million years of human life. First introducing the basic principles, methods and theoretical approaches of archaeology, the book then provides a summary of world prehistory from a global perspective, exploring human origins and the reality of life in the archaic world. Later chapters describe the development of agriculture and animal domestication and the emergence of cities, states, and pre-industrial civilizations in widely separated parts of the world. With this new edition updated to reflect the latest discoveries and research in the discipline, Ancient Lives continues to be a comprehensive and essential introduction to archaeology.

The Invisible Sex

Uncovering the True Roles of Women in Prehistory
Author: J. M. Adovasio,Olga Soffer,Jake Page
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131541807X
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 6215

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Shaped by cartoons and museum dioramas, our vision of Paleolithic times tends to feature fur-clad male hunters fearlessly attacking mammoths while timid women hover fearfully behind a boulder. Recent archaeological research has shown that this vision bears little relation to reality. J. M. Adovasio and Olga Soffer, two of the world's leading experts on perishable artifacts such as basketry, cordage, and weaving, present an exciting new look at prehistory. With science writer Jake Page, they argue that women invented all kinds of critical materials, including the clothing necessary for life in colder climates, the ropes used to make rafts that enabled long-distance travel by water, and nets used for communal hunting. Even more important, women played a central role in the development of language and social life—in short, in our becoming human. In this eye-opening book, a new story about women in prehistory emerges with provocative implications for our assumptions about gender today.

Death from a Distance and the Birth of a Humane Universe

Human Evolution, Behavior, History, and Your Future
Author: Paul M. Bingham,Joanne Souza
Publisher: Booksurge Publishing
ISBN: 9781439254127
Category: Science
Page: 714
View: 7644

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A comprehensive often spellbinding exploration of humans: How we came to be unique among all the Earth's animal species and how this uniqueness has shaped our history, behavior, and contemporary lives

The Prehistory of Music

Human Evolution, Archaeology, and the Origins of Musicality
Author: Iain Morley
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199234086
Category: History
Page: 447
View: 1546

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This volume investigates the evolutionary origins of our musical abilities, the nature of music, and the earliest archaeological evidence for musical activities amongst our ancestors. It seeks to understand the relationship between our musical capabilities and the development of our social, emotional, and communicative abilities as a species.