Greater Medieval Houses of England and Wales, 1300–1500: Volume 3, Southern England


Author: Anthony Emery
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139449199
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 5927

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This is the third volume of Anthony Emery's magisterial survey, Greater Medieval Houses of England and Wales, 1300–1500, first published in 2006. Across the three volumes Emery has examined afresh and re-assessed over 750 houses, the first comprehensive review of the subject for 150 years. Covered are the full range of leading homes, from royal and episcopal palaces to manor houses, as well as community buildings such as academic colleges, monastic granges and secular colleges of canons. This volume surveys Southern England and is divided into three regions, each of which includes a separate historical and architectural introduction as well as thematic essays prompted by key buildings. The text is complemented throughout by a wide range of plans and diagrams and a wealth of photographs showing the present condition of almost every house discussed. This is an essential source for anyone interested in the history, architecture and culture of medieval England and Wales.

Canadian Geographical Journal


Author: Lawrence Johnstone Burpee
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Canada
Page: N.A
View: 3464

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Vols. for 1930-Dec. 1930 include section "Amongst the new books."

The Athenaeum

A Journal of Literature, Science, the Fine Arts, Music, and the Drama
Author: James Silk Buckingham,John Sterling,Frederick Denison Maurice,Henry Stebbing,Charles Wentworth Dilke,Thomas Kibble Hervey,William Hepworth Dixon,Norman Maccoll,Vernon Horace Rendall,John Middleton Murry
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 3449

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The London Mercury


Author: J.C. Squire,Rolfe Arnold Scott-James
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: English literature
Page: N.A
View: 5138

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Encyclopedia Britannica

A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and General Information
Author: Hugh Chisholm
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Encyclopedias and dictionaries
Page: N.A
View: 9216

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The Encyclopaedia Britannica

A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and General Information
Author: Hugh Chisholm
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Encyclopedias and dictionaries
Page: N.A
View: 2728

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Art Books


Author: R. R. Bowker,R.R. Bowker Company
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Art
Page: 780
View: 3404

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Including an international directory of museum permanent collection catalogs.

Art Books, 1876-1949

Including an International Index of Current Serial Publications
Author: R.R. Bowker Company
Publisher: R. R. Bowker
ISBN: N.A
Category: Art
Page: 780
View: 3541

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Map of a Nation

A Biography Of The Ordnance Survey
Author: Rachel Hewitt
Publisher: Granta Books
ISBN: 1847084524
Category: History
Page: 432
View: 8134

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Map of a Nation tells the story of the creation of the Ordnance Survey map – the first complete, accurate, affordable map of the British Isles. The Ordnance Survey is a much beloved British institution, and Map of a Nation is, amazingly, the first popular history to tell the story of the map and the men who dreamt and delivered it. The Ordnance Survey’s history is one of political revolutions, rebellions and regional unions that altered the shape and identity of the United Kingdom over the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. It’s also a deliciously readable account of one of the great untold British adventure stories, featuring intrepid individuals lugging brass theodolites up mountains to make the country visible to itself for the first time.

Anthropology of Landscape

The Extraordinary in the Ordinary
Author: Christopher Tilley,Kate Cameron-Daum
Publisher: UCL Press
ISBN: 1911307444
Category: Social Science
Page: 346
View: 791

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An Anthropology of Landscape tells the fascinating story of a heathland landscape in south-west England and the way different individuals and groups engage with it. Based on a long-term anthropological study, the book emphasises four individual themes: embodied identities, the landscape as a sensuous material form that is acted upon and in turn acts on people, the landscape as contested, and its relation to emotion. The landscape is discussed in relation to these themes as both ‘taskscape’ and ‘leisurescape’, and from the perspective of different user groups. First, those who manage the landscape and use it for work: conservationists, environmentalists, archaeologists, the Royal Marines, and quarrying interests. Second, those who use it in their leisure time: cyclists and horse riders, model aircraft flyers, walkers, people who fish there, and artists who are inspired by it. The book makes an innovative contribution to landscape studies and will appeal to all those interested in nature conservation, historic preservation, the politics of nature, the politics of identity, and an anthropology of Britain.

The Condition of the Working-Class in England in 1844


Author: Frederick Engels
Publisher: BookRix GmbH & Company KG
ISBN: 3730964852
Category: History
Page: 466
View: 9448

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The Condition of the Working Class in England is one of the best-known works of Friedrich Engels. Originally written in German as Die Lage der arbeitenden Klasse in England, it is a study of the working class in Victorian England. It was also Engels' first book, written during his stay in Manchester from 1842 to 1844. Manchester was then at the very heart of the Industrial Revolution, and Engels compiled his study from his own observations and detailed contemporary reports. Engels argues that the Industrial Revolution made workers worse off. He shows, for example, that in large industrial cities mortality from disease, as well as death-rates for workers were higher than in the countryside. In cities like Manchester and Liverpool mortality from smallpox, measles, scarlet fever and whooping cough was four times as high as in the surrounding countryside, and mortality from convulsions was ten times as high as in the countryside. The overall death-rate in Manchester and Liverpool was significantly higher than the national average (one in 32.72 and one in 31.90 and even one in 29.90, compared with one in 45 or one in 46). An interesting example shows the increase in the overall death-rates in the industrial town of Carlisle where before the introduction of mills (1779-1787), 4,408 out of 10,000 children died before reaching the age of five, and after their introduction the figure rose to 4,738. Before the introduction of mills, 1,006 out of 10,000 adults died before reaching 39 years old, and after their introduction the death rate rose to 1,261 out of 10,000.