Dreamers

An Immigrant Generation's Fight for Their American Dream
Author: Eileen Truax
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807030325
Category: Political Science
Page: 224
View: 4989

Continue Reading →

Dreamers is a movement book for the generation brought to the United States as children—and now fighting to live here legally Of the approximately twelve million undocumented immigrants living in the United States, as many as two million came as children. They grow up here, going to elementary, middle, and high school, and then the country they call home won’t—in most states—offer financial aid for college and they’re unable to be legally employed. In 2001, US senator Dick Durbin introduced the DREAM Act to Congress, an initiative that would allow these young people to become legal residents if they met certain requirements. And now, more than ten years later, in the face of congressional inertia and furious opposition from some, the DREAM Act has yet to be passed. But recently, this young generation has begun organizing, and with their rallying cry “Undocumented, Unapologetic, and Unafraid” they are the newest face of the human rights movement. In Dreamers, Eileen Truax illuminates the stories of these men and women who are living proof of a complex and sometimes hidden political reality that calls into question what it truly means to be American.

How Does It Feel to Be Unwanted?

Stories of Resistance and Resilience from Mexicans Living in the United States
Author: Eileen Truax
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807073415
Category: Social Science
Page: 216
View: 7652

Continue Reading →

In an era of increasing anti-immigrant sentiment and bigotry, each of these 13 stories illuminates the issues affecting the Mexican community and shows the breadth of a frequently stereotyped population. Dreamers and their allies, those who care about immigration justice, and anyone interested in the experience of Mexicans in the US will respond to these stories of Mexican immigrants (some documented, some not) illuminating their complex lives. Regardless of status, many are subjected to rights violations, inequality, and violence--all of which existed well before the Trump administration--and have profound feelings of being unwanted in the country they call home. There's Monica Robles, the undocumented mother of three US citizens who is literally confined to a strip of territory between two checkpoints--one at the Mexico border and one twenty-seven miles north of the border. We meet Jeanette Vizguerra, who came to symbolize the sanctuary movement when she took shelter in a Denver church in February 2017 to avoid deportation. (Later that year, Time magazine named her one of the one hundred most influential people in the world.) There's Daniel Rodriguez, the first undocumented immigration lawyer in Arizona to successfully obtain a license to practice. Alberto Mendoza, who suffered persecution as a gay man for years, in 2013 founded Honor 41, a national Latina/o LGBTQ organization that promotes positive images of their community. After crossing the border illegally with his mother as a child, Al Labrada later joined the military to get on a path to citizenship; in March 2017, he was promoted to captain in the Los Angeles Police Department. These and eight other stories will broaden how you think about Mexicans in America.

Immigration and Women

Understanding the American Experience
Author: Susan C. Pearce,Elizabeth J. Clifford,Reena Tandon
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814768261
Category: Social Science
Page: 309
View: 7928

Continue Reading →

This title is a national portrait of immigrant women who live in the United States today, featuring the voices of these women as they describe their contributions to work, culture, and activism.

Dreamers Have a Dream Too


Author: Ed Escoto
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781977672230
Category: Illegal alien children
Page: 62
View: 3143

Continue Reading →

The Dreamer's dream is deeply rooted in the American Dream. This dream is the result of arriving to the United States as children through no fault of their own. An unintended consequence of good people who simply wanted a better life for their children. There is one thing that unites Dreamers and non-Dreamers alike: We are working hard to better ourselves and our communities. We all want a better life for our kids and family. As we look back throughout history, what is just and right becomes evident. I don't want the next generation to look back and wonder why good people stood silent and did nothing. "The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy." - Martin Luther King Jr. At the end of the day, we are all more alike than we are different. We all love this country and want to build a better future here. We are all after the same thing... A chance to go after the American Dream. We Are All Dreamers

Habeas Corpus after 9/11

Confronting America’s New Global Detention System
Author: Jonathan Hafetz
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814773437
Category: Political Science
Page: 331
View: 4099

Continue Reading →

The U.S. detention center at Guantánamo Bay has long been synonymous with torture, secrecy, and the abuse of executive power. It has come to epitomize lawlessness and has sparked protracted legal battles and political debate. For too long, however, Guantánamo has been viewed in isolation and has overshadowed a larger, interconnected global detention system that includes other military prisons such as Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan, secret CIA jails, and the transfer of prisoners to other countries for torture. Guantánamo is simply—and alarmingly—the most visible example of a much larger prison system designed to operate outside the law. Habeas Corpus after 9/11 examines the rise of the U.S.-run global detention system that emerged after 9/11 and the efforts to challenge it through habeas corpus (a petition to appear in court to claim unlawful imprisonment). Habeas expert and litigator Jonathan Hafetz gives us an insider’s view of the detention of “enemy combatants” and an accessible explanation of the complex forces that keep these systems running. In the age of terrorism, some argue that habeas corpus is impractical and unwise. Hafetz advocates that it remains the single most important check against arbitrary and unlawful detention, torture, and the abuse of executive power.

Demography

The Study of Human Population, Fourth Edition
Author: Jennifer Hickes Lundquist,Douglas L. Anderton,David Yaukey
Publisher: Waveland Press
ISBN: 1478628146
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
View: 777

Continue Reading →

The population processes in which we all participate are compared, contrasted, and synthesized into understandable trends in the latest edition of this widely acclaimed text. The authors’ cogent analysis encompasses demographic milestones like surpassing the seven billion population mark and becoming a majority urban population for the first time in human history, as well as the repercussions of a global financial crisis and the implications of two important ongoing trends: aging and fertility decline. New data, examples, and discussions of emerging demographic issues are incorporated throughout the value-priced Fourth Edition, along with graphics that highlight trends and facilitate comparisons among world regions. This pedagogically rich volume also includes propositions for debate and end-of-chapter exercises that allow readers to become comfortable with the quantitative tools that demographers use to measure and describe populations. Moreover, users will learn about some of the people behind the research that informs this text in a new feature called Careers in Demography.

The Making of a Dream

How a group of young undocumented immigrants helped change what it means to be American
Author: Laura Wides-Muñoz
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 006256014X
Category: Social Science
Page: 384
View: 4755

Continue Reading →

A journalist chronicles the next chapter in civil rights—the story of a movement and a nation, witnessed through the poignant and inspiring experiences of five young undocumented activists who are transforming society’s attitudes toward one of the most contentious political matters roiling America today: immigration. They are called the DREAMers: young people who were brought, or sent, to the United States as children and who have lived for years in America without legal status. Growing up, they often worked hard in school, planned for college, only to learn they were, in the eyes of the United States government and many citizens, "illegal aliens." Determined to take fate into their own hands, a group of these young undocumented immigrants risked their safety to "come out" about their status—sparking a transformative movement, engineering a seismic shift in public opinion on immigration, and inspiring other social movements across the country. Their quest for permanent legal protection under the so-called "Dream Act," stalled. But in 2012, the Obama administration issued a landmark, new immigration policy: Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, which has since protected more than half a million young immigrants from deportation even as efforts to install more expansive protections remain elusive. The Making of a Dream begins at the turn of the millennium, with the first of a series of "Dream Act" proposals; follows the efforts of policy makers, activists, and undocumented immigrants themselves, and concludes with the 2016 presidential election and the first months of the Trump presidency. The immigrants’ coming of age stories intersect with the watershed political and economic events of the last two decades: 9/11, the recession, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Obama presidency, and the rebirth of the anti-immigrant right. In telling their story, Laura Wides-Muñoz forces us to rethink our definition of what it means to be American.

Undocumented and in College

Students and Institutions in a Climate of National Hostility
Author: Terry-Ann Jones,Laura Nichols
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780823276165
Category: Education
Page: 192
View: 9232

Continue Reading →

This book chronicles the experiences of undocumented students at Jesuit institutions of higher education. Based on an extensive study that incorporated survey research and in-depth interviews, the study presents the perspectives of students, staff, and the institutions, and is framed within immigration's historical and legal contexts.

The Children of Eve

Population and Well-being in History
Author: Louis P. Cain,Donald G. Paterson
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1444336894
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 391
View: 4896

Continue Reading →

"This book explores contemporary population issues in a historical context. It is a world economic history of demographic change with emphasis on the well-being of the population. Exploring the years since the Middle Ages, this unique book emphasizes the commonality of human experience illustrating how different people, at different times, in varying circumstances, responded to similar economic forces in more of less the same way"--

Lives in Limbo

Undocumented and Coming of Age in America
Author: Roberto G. Gonzales
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520287266
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 3900

Continue Reading →

"Over two million of the nation's eleven million undocumented immigrants have lived in the United States since childhood. Due to a broken immigration system, they grow up to uncertain futures. In Lives in Limbo, Roberto G. Gonzales introduces us to two groups: the college-goers, like Ricardo, whose good grades and strong network of community support propelled him into higher education, only to land in a factory job a few years after graduation, and the early-exiters, like Gabriel, who failed to make meaningful connections in high school and started navigating dead-end jobs, immigration checkpoints, and a world narrowly circumscribed by legal limitations. This ethnography asks why highly educated undocumented youth ultimately share similar work and life outcomes with their less-educated peers, even as higher education is touted as the path to integration and success in America. Gonzales bookends his study with discussions of how the prospect of immigration reform, especially the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, could impact the lives of these young Americans"--Provided by publisher.

The DREAMers

How the Undocumented Youth Movement Transformed the Immigrant Rights Debate
Author: Walter J. Nicholls
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804788693
Category: Social Science
Page: 240
View: 3080

Continue Reading →

On May 17, 2010, four undocumented students occupied the Arizona office of Senator John McCain. Across the country a flurry of occupations, hunger strikes, demonstrations, and marches followed, calling for support of the DREAM Act that would allow these young people the legal right to stay in the United States. The highly public, confrontational nature of these actions marked a sharp departure from more subdued, anonymous forms of activism of years past. The DREAMers provides the first investigation of the youth movement that has transformed the national immigration debate, from its start in the early 2000s through the present day. Walter Nicholls draws on interviews, news stories, and firsthand encounters with activists to highlight the strategies and claims that have created this now-powerful voice in American politics. Facing high levels of anti-immigrant sentiment across the country, undocumented youths sought to increase support for their cause and change the terms of debate by arguing for their unique position—as culturally integrated, long term residents and most importantly as "American" youth sharing in core American values. Since 2010 undocumented activists have increasingly claimed their own space in the public sphere, asserting a right to recognition—a right to have rights. Ultimately, through the story of the undocumented youth movement, The DREAMers shows how a stigmatized group—whether immigrants or others—can gain a powerful voice in American political debate.

Spare Parts

Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream
Author: Joshua Davis
Publisher: FSG Originals
ISBN: 0374712654
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 240
View: 7711

Continue Reading →

Four undocumented Mexican American students, two great teachers, one robot-building contest . . . and a major motion picture In 2004, four Latino teenagers arrived at the Marine Advanced Technology Education Robotics Competition at the University of California, Santa Barbara. They were born in Mexico but raised in Phoenix, Arizona, where they attended an underfunded public high school. No one had ever suggested to Oscar, Cristian, Luis, or Lorenzo that they might amount to much—but two inspiring science teachers had convinced these impoverished, undocumented kids from the desert who had never even seen the ocean that they should try to build an underwater robot. And build a robot they did. Their robot wasn't pretty, especially compared to those of the competition. They were going up against some of the best collegiate engineers in the country, including a team from MIT backed by a $10,000 grant from ExxonMobil. The Phoenix teenagers had scraped together less than $1,000 and built their robot out of scavenged parts. This was never a level competition—and yet, against all odds . . . they won! But this is just the beginning for these four, whose story—which became a key inspiration to the DREAMers movement—will go on to include first-generation college graduations, deportation, bean-picking in Mexico, and service in Afghanistan. Joshua Davis's Spare Parts is a story about overcoming insurmountable odds and four young men who proved they were among the most patriotic and talented Americans in this country—even as the country tried to kick them out.

Behold the Dreamers


Author: Imbolo Mbue
Publisher: Fourth Estate
ISBN: 9780008237998
Category:
Page: 400
View: 7086

Continue Reading →

WINNER OF THE 2017 PEN/FAULKNER AWARD A NEW YORK TIMES BOOK OF THE YEAR AN OBSERVER BOOK OF THE YEAR 'A formidable storyteller' Jonathan Franzen 'Savage and compassionate in all the right places' New York Times Book Review 'Eerily timely ... bittersweet and buoyant' Jessie Burton New York, 2007. After two long years apart, Jende Jonga has brought his wife Neni from Cameroon to join him in the land of opportunity. Drawn by the promise of America they are seeking the chance of a better life for them and their son. When Jende lands a dream job as chauffeur to a Lehman Brothers executive, Neni finds herself taken into the confidence of his glamorous wife Cindy. The Edwards are powerful and privileged: dazzling examples of what America can offer to those who are prepared to strive for it. But when the financial world is rocked by the collapse of Lehman Brothers, all four lives are dramatically upended. As faultlines appear in both marriages and secrets bubble to the surface they must all decide how far they will go in pursuit of their dreams. And what will they sacrifice along the way? 'A marvellous debut... as deeply insightful as it is delightfully entertaining' Taiye Selasi

The Book of Unknown Americans

A novel
Author: Cristina Henríquez
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0385350856
Category: Fiction
Page: 304
View: 5937

Continue Reading →

“A triumph of storytelling. Henríquez pulls us into the lives of her characters with such mastery that we hang on to them just as fiercely as they hang on to one another and their dreams. This passionate, powerful novel will stay with you long after you’ve turned the final page.” —Ben Fountain, author of Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk A boy and a girl who fall in love. Two families whose hopes collide with destiny. An extraordinary novel that offers a resonant new definition of what it means to be American. Arturo and Alma Rivera have lived their whole lives in Mexico. One day, their beautiful fifteen-year-old daughter, Maribel, sustains a terrible injury, one that casts doubt on whether she’ll ever be the same. And so, leaving all they have behind, the Riveras come to America with a single dream: that in this country of great opportunity and resources, Maribel can get better. When Mayor Toro, whose family is from Panama, sees Maribel in a Dollar Tree store, it is love at first sight. It’s also the beginning of a friendship between the Rivera and Toro families, whose web of guilt and love and responsibility is at this novel’s core. Woven into their stories are the testimonials of men and women who have come to the United States from all over Latin America. Their journeys and their voices will inspire you, surprise you, and break your heart. Suspenseful, wry and immediate, rich in spirit and humanity, The Book of Unknown Americans is a work of rare force and originality. This eBook edition includes a Reading Group Guide.

The Andrew Paradigm

How to Be a Lead Follower of Jesus
Author: Michael J. Coyner
Publisher: Abingdon Press
ISBN: 1426761546
Category: Religion
Page: 78
View: 3353

Continue Reading →

The current trend in church leadership involves looking for a highly gifted leader who will take over, direct the future, cast a vision, and attract the faithful to a new mission or purpose. This desire for a leader to come to the rescue is eerily reminiscenet of the desire of the Israelites for a king, so they could "be like every other nation." In spite of Samuel's warnings, the people insisted, so God reluctantly gave them King Saul. That didn't go so well. While we always need good, new, and talented leaders, we also need leaders who know how and when to be good followers. Particularly in a culture of distrust, leadership must be granted, earned, and supported by those who are willing to follow. Leading begins with the counter-intuitive command: "Come, follow me." This imperative is far from easy. Many turned away from Jesus, unable to follow. However, one excellent model of "followership" stood out from the rest - the little-known disciple Andrew. In fact, Andrew is the model and paradigm for being a Lead Follower. Excellent Christian leadership is more about following Jesus than it is about learning the latest fads or tricks from business, the marketplace, or the academy. Being an excellent Christian leader involves first and foremost being an excellent and faithful follower of Jesus Christ.

Queer Brown Voices

Personal Narratives of Latina/o LGBT Activism
Author: Uriel Quesada,Letitia Gomez,Salvador Vidal-Ortiz
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 1477302344
Category: Social Science
Page: 272
View: 7188

Continue Reading →

In the last three decades of the twentieth century, LGBT Latinas/os faced several forms of discrimination. The greater Latino community did not often accept sexual minorities, and the mainstream LGBT movement expected everyone, regardless of their ethnic and racial background, to adhere to a specific set of priorities so as to accommodate a “unified” agenda. To disrupt the cycle of sexism, racism, and homophobia that they experienced, LGBT Latinas/os organized themselves on local, state, and national levels, forming communities in which they could fight for equal rights while simultaneously staying true to both their ethnic and sexual identities. Yet histories of LGBT activism in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s often reduce the role that Latinas/os played, resulting in misinformation, or ignore their work entirely, erasing them from history. Queer Brown Voices is the first book published to counter this trend, documenting the efforts of some of these LGBT Latina/o activists. Comprising essays and oral history interviews that present the experiences of fourteen activists across the United States and in Puerto Rico, the book offers a new perspective on the history of LGBT mobilization and activism. The activists discuss subjects that shed light not only on the organizations they helped to create and operate, but also on their broad-ranging experiences of being racialized and discriminated against, fighting for access to health care during the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and struggling for awareness.

Uprising

A New Age Is Dawning for Every Mother's Daughter
Author: Sally Armstrong
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1250045282
Category: Political Science
Page: 288
View: 5784

Continue Reading →

In this groundbreaking book, an award-winning humanitarian and journalist, breaking new ground in the global fight for women's rights, introduces us to the women all over the world whose courage, tenacity and wit are altering the status quo. 30,000 first printing.

Patriot Number One

American Dreams in Chinatown
Author: Lauren Hilgers
Publisher: Crown
ISBN: 0451496159
Category: Social Science
Page: 336
View: 5214

Continue Reading →

A NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW EDITORS' CHOICE The deeply reported story of one indelible family transplanted from rural China to New York City, forging a life between two worlds In 2014, in a snow-covered house in Flushing, Queens, a village revolutionary from Southern China considered his options. Zhuang Liehong was the son of a fisherman, the former owner of a small tea shop, and the spark that had sent his village into an uproar—pitting residents against a corrupt local government. Under the alias Patriot Number One, he had stoked a series of pro-democracy protests, hoping to change his home for the better. Instead, sensing an impending crackdown, Zhuang and his wife, Little Yan, left their infant son with relatives and traveled to America. With few contacts and only a shaky grasp of English, they had to start from scratch. In Patriot Number One, Hilgers follows this dauntless family through a world hidden in plain sight: a byzantine network of employment agencies and language schools, of underground asylum brokers and illegal dormitories that Flushing’s Chinese community relies on for survival. As the irrepressibly opinionated Zhuang and the more pragmatic Little Yan pursue legal status and struggle to reunite with their son, we also meet others piecing together a new life in Flushing. Tang, a democracy activist who was caught up in the Tiananmen Square crackdown in 1989, is still dedicated to his cause after more than a decade in exile. Karen, a college graduate whose mother imagined a bold American life for her, works part-time in a nail salon as she attends vocational school, and refuses to look backward. With a novelist’s eye for character and detail, Hilgers captures the joys and indignities of building a life in a new country—and the stubborn allure of the American dream.

The Leavers (National Book Award Finalist)

A Novel
Author: Lisa Ko
Publisher: Algonquin Books
ISBN: 1616207132
Category: Fiction
Page: 352
View: 3301

Continue Reading →

FINALIST FOR THE 2017 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FOR FICTION Named a Best Book of 2017 by NPR, Entertainment Weekly, the Los Angeles Times, BuzzFeed, Bustle, and Electric Literature “There was a time I would have called Lisa Ko’s novel beautifully written, ambitious, and moving, and all of that is true, but it’s more than that now: if you want to understand a forgotten and essential part of the world we live in, The Leavers is required reading.” —Ann Patchett, author of Commonwealth Lisa Ko’s powerful debut, The Leavers, is the winner of the 2016 PEN/Bellwether Prize for Fiction, awarded by Barbara Kingsolver for a novel that addresses issues of social justice. One morning, Deming Guo’s mother, Polly, an undocumented Chinese immigrant, goes to her job at a nail salon—and never comes home. No one can find any trace of her. With his mother gone, eleven-year-old Deming is left mystified and bereft. Eventually adopted by a pair of well-meaning white professors, Deming is moved from the Bronx to a small town upstate and renamed Daniel Wilkinson. But far from all he’s ever known, Daniel struggles to reconcile his adoptive parents’ desire that he assimilate with his memories of his mother and the community he left behind. Told from the perspective of both Daniel—as he grows into a directionless young man—and Polly, Ko’s novel gives us one of fiction’s most singular mothers. Loving and selfish, determined and frightened, Polly is forced to make one heartwrenching choice after another. Set in New York and China, The Leavers is a vivid examination of borders and belonging. It’s a moving story of how a boy comes into his own when everything he loves is taken away, and how a mother learns to live with the mistakes of the past. Lisa Ko’s fiction has appeared in Best American Short Stories 2016, Apogee Journal, Narrative, Copper Nickel, the Asian Pacific American Journal, and elsewhere. She has been awarded fellowships and residencies from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the MacDowell Colony, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Writers OMI at Ledig House, the Jerome Foundation, and Blue Mountain Center, among others. She was born in New York City, where she now lives. Visit her at lisa-ko.com.