Documents of American Constitutional and Legal History: From the founding to 1896


Author: Melvin I. Urofsky,Paul Finkelman
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195323115
Category: Law
Page: 596
View: 1672

Continue Reading →

Documents of American Constitutional and Legal History, Third Edition, is a two-volume companion to Urofsky and Finkelman's successful text, A March of Liberty, Second Edition. Organized chronologically, this documents reader skillfully weaves together constitutional and legal history, offering students a mix of both frequently cited and lesser-known--but equally important--historical documents and court decisions that have been instrumental in shaping the nation's constitutional development. The editors provide an introduction to each document, which summarizes its significance and places it within its historical context. Each introduction is followed by a brief list of suggestions for further reading. Both volumes contain the complete text of the U.S. Constitution for ease of reference. The third edition has been updated to include both newly significant documents from the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries and many recent legal documents of significance, from the latest Supreme Court decisions up through the recent Guantanamo Bay controversy. In addition, the introductions have been revised and the suggested reading sections have been updated to reflect recent scholarship. For the first time, this edition will also include the voting records for each case and an appendix of U.S. Supreme court judges and their tenures. This reader is an essential resource for anyone studying U.S. Constitutional History and/or Law.

Documents of American Constitutional and Legal History: From the founding through the age of industrialization


Author: Melvin I. Urofsky,Paul Finkelman
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195128703
Category: History
Page: 1065
View: 3695

Continue Reading →

Documents of American Constitutional and Legal History, 2/e, is a two-volume companion to Urofsky and Finkelman's successful text, A March of Liberty, 2/e. Organized chronologically, this documents reader skillfully weaves together constitutional and legal history, offering students a mix of both frequently cited and lesser-known-but equally important-historical documents and court decisions that have been instrumental in shaping the nation's constitutional development. The editors provide an introduction to each document, which summarizes its significance and places it within its historical context. Each introduction is followed by a brief list of suggestions for further reading. Both volumes contain the complete text of the U.S. Constitution for ease of reference. Now in its second edition, Documents of American Constitutional and Legal History has been updated to reflect the most recent constitutional and legal scholarship, including material on the latest Supreme Court decisions and the recent presidential election controversy. In addition, the introductory notes and suggested reading sections have also been revised. Volume I covers the period from colonization up through the age of industrialization. Documents of American Constitutional and Legal History, 2/e, is an essential resource for courses in U.S. Constitutional history and legal history, as well as constitutional law courses in other disciplines.

War and Liberty

An American Dilemma : 1790 to the Present
Author: Geoffrey R. Stone
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393330045
Category: History
Page: 220
View: 8980

Continue Reading →

An analysis of the challenges of preserving civil liberties in wartime by the national award-winning author of Perilous Times provides in-depth coverage of how constitutional rights have changed during the presidency of George W. Bush, in an account that also describes similar repressions of American civil liberties in times of war throughout history. Original.

A Slaveholders' Union

Slavery, Politics, and the Constitution in the Early American Republic
Author: George William Van Cleve
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226846695
Category: History
Page: 408
View: 8190

Continue Reading →

After its early introduction into the English colonies in North America, slavery in the United States lasted as a legal institution until the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution in 1865. But increasingly during the contested politics of the early republic, abolitionists cried out that the Constitution itself was a slaveowners’ document, produced to protect and further their rights. A Slaveholders’ Union furthers this unsettling claim by demonstrating once and for all that slavery was indeed an essential part of the foundation of the nascent republic. In this powerful book, George William Van Cleve demonstrates that the Constitution was pro-slavery in its politics, its economics, and its law. He convincingly shows that the Constitutional provisions protecting slavery were much more than mere “political” compromises—they were integral to the principles of the new nation. By the late 1780s, a majority of Americans wanted to create a strong federal republic that would be capable of expanding into a continental empire. In order for America to become an empire on such a scale, Van Cleve argues, the Southern states had to be willing partners in the endeavor, and the cost of their allegiance was the deliberate long-term protection of slavery by America’s leaders through the nation’s early expansion. Reconsidering the role played by the gradual abolition of slavery in the North, Van Cleve also shows that abolition there was much less progressive in its origins—and had much less influence on slavery’s expansion—than previously thought. Deftly interweaving historical and political analyses, A Slaveholders’ Union will likely become the definitive explanation of slavery’s persistence and growth—and of its influence on American constitutional development—from the Revolutionary War through the Missouri Compromise of 1821.

Documents of American Constitutional and Legal History: From 1896 to the present


Author: Melvin I. Urofsky,Paul Finkelman
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195323122
Category: History
Page: 1212
View: 1683

Continue Reading →

Documents of American Constitutional and Legal History, Third Edition, is a two-volume companion to Urofsky and Finkelman's successful text, A March of Liberty, 2/e. Organized chronologically, this documents reader skillfully weaves together constitutional and legal history, offering students a mix of both frequently cited and lesser-known-but equally important-historical documents and court decisions that have been instrumental in shaping the nation's constitutional development. The editors provide an introduction to each document, which summarizes its significance and places it within its historical context. Each introduction is followed by a brief list of suggestions for further reading. Both volumes contain the complete text of the U.S. Constitution for ease of reference. The third edition has been updated to include both newly significant documents from the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries and many recent legal documents of significance, from the latest Supreme Courtdecisions up through the recent Guantanamo Bay controversy. In addition, the introductions have been revised and the suggested reading sections have been updated to reflect recent scholarship. For the first time, this edition will also include the voting records for each case and an appendix of U.S. Supreme court judges and their tenures. This reader is an essential resource for anyone studying U.S. Constitutional History and/or Law.

Liberty of Contract

Rediscovering a Lost Constitutional Right
Author: David N. Mayer
Publisher: Cato Institute
ISBN: 1935308408
Category: Law
Page: 165
View: 400

Continue Reading →

Examines the history of the liberty of contract and shows how this right has been continuously diminished by court decisions and by our country's growing regulatory and welfare state.

A History of the Supreme Court


Author: Bernard Schwartz
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195093872
Category: History
Page: 465
View: 607

Continue Reading →

A comprehensive history of the United States Supreme Court from its ill-esteemed beginning in 1790 to one of the most important and controversial branches of the Federal government.

A March of Liberty: From the founding to 1890


Author: Melvin I. Urofsky,Paul Finkelman
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195126341
Category: History
Page: 576
View: 854

Continue Reading →

This work is an overview of American constitutional development, from the founding of the English colonies down through the decisions of the latest term of the Supreme Court. It offers a complete reference work that should be intelligible to the layperson as well as to the specialist.

Supreme Decisions, Combined Volume

Great Constitutional Cases and Their Impact
Author: Melvin I. Urofsky
Publisher: Westview Press
ISBN: 081334736X
Category: History
Page: 448
View: 7998

Continue Reading →

Supreme Decisions: Great Constitutional Cases and Their Impact, Volumes 1 and 2, covers twenty-four Supreme Court cases (twelve per volume) that have shaped American constitutional law. Interpretive chapters shed light on the nuances of each case, the individuals involved, and the social, political, and cultural context at that particular moment in history. Discussing cases from nearly every decade in a two-hundred-year span, Melvin I. Urofsky expounds on the political climate of the United States from the country's infancy through the new millennium. Featuring Marbury v. Madison, Dred Scott v. Sandford, Miranda v. Arizona, Brown v. Board of Education, and many more, this text covers foundational rulings and more recent decisions. Written with students in mind, Melvin I. Urofsky's voice offers compelling and fascinating accounts of American legal milestones. Supreme Decisions can be purchased as a single combined volume or conveniently split into two volumes, providing a breadth of information for survey courses in U.S. Constitutional History.

The Weight of Vengeance

The United States, the British Empire, and the War of 1812
Author: Troy Bickham
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199969191
Category: History
Page: 344
View: 803

Continue Reading →

In early 1815, Secretary of State James Monroe reviewed the treaty with Britain that would end the War of 1812. The United States Navy was blockaded in port; much of the army had not been paid for nearly a year; the capital had been burned. The treaty offered an unexpected escape from disaster. Yet it incensed Monroe, for the name of Great Britain and its negotiators consistently appeared before those of the United States. "The United States have acquired a certain rank amongst nations, which is due to their population and political importance," he brazenly scolded the British diplomat who conveyed the treaty, "and they do not stand in the same situation as at former periods." Monroe had a point, writes Troy Bickham. In The Weight of Vengeance, Bickham provides a provocative new account of America's forgotten war, underscoring its significance for both sides by placing it in global context. The Napoleonic Wars profoundly disrupted the global order, from India to Haiti to New Orleans. Spain's power slipped, allowing the United States to target the Floridas; the Haitian slave revolt contributed to the Louisiana Purchase; fears that Britain would ally with Tecumseh and disrupt the American northwest led to a pre-emptive strike on his people in 1811. This shifting balance of power provided the United States with the opportunity to challenge Britain's dominance of the Atlantic world. And it was an important conflict for Britain as well. Powerful elements in the British Empire so feared the rise of its former colonies that the British government sought to use the War of 1812 to curtail America's increasing maritime power and its aggressive territorial expansion. And by late 1814, Britain had more men under arms in North America than it had in the Peninsular War against Napoleon, with the war with America costing about as much as its huge subsidies to European allies. Troy Bickham has given us an authoritative, lucidly written global account that transforms our understanding of this pivotal war.

A March of Liberty


Author: Melvin I. Urofsky,Paul Finkelman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195220094
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 9535

Continue Reading →

Lincoln's Greatest Case: The River, the Bridge, and the Making of America


Author: Brian McGinty
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 087140785X
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 6385

Continue Reading →

The untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight. In May of 1856, the steamboat Effie Afton barreled into a pillar of the Rock Island Bridge, unalterably changing the course of American transportation history. Within a year, long-simmering tensions between powerful steamboat interests and burgeoning railroads exploded, and the nation’s attention, absorbed by the Dred Scott case, was riveted by a new civil trial. Dramatically reenacting the Effie Afton case—from its unlikely inception, complete with a young Abraham Lincoln’s soaring oratory, to the controversial finale—this “masterful” (Christian Science Monitor) account gives us the previously untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight.

Dred Scott V. Sandford

A Brief History with Documents
Author: Paul Finkelman
Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's
ISBN: 9781319048983
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 1858

Continue Reading →

University of Chicago Law Review: Symposium - Understanding Education in the United States

Volume 79, Number 1 - Winter 2012
Author: University of Chicago Law Review
Publisher: Quid Pro Books
ISBN: 161027945X
Category: Law
Page: 464
View: 7907

Continue Reading →

A leading law review now offers a quality eBook edition. This first issue of 2012 features articles and essays from internationally recognized legal and education scholars, including an extensive Symposium on understanding education and law in the United States. Topics include economic structures in education, teaching patriotism, charter and Catholic schools, Amish one-room schools, minority students, empirical work on religious schools, federalism, equal opportunity, and higher-education accreditation. In addition, the issue includes articles by Clayton Gillette on municipal bankruptcy and federalism, and Steven Horowitz on copyright law's asymetry, as well as a comment on wartime waivers. The issue serves, in effect, as an extensive book on cutting-edge issues of educational law and policy in the United States by renowned researchers in the field. It is presented in modern ebook formatting and features active Tables of Contents; linked footnotes and URLs; linked cross-references; and legible graphs.

University of Chicago Law Review: Volume 81, Number 4 - Fall 2014


Author: University of Chicago Law Review
Publisher: Quid Pro Books
ISBN: 1610278585
Category: Law
Page: 686
View: 1673

Continue Reading →

The University of Chicago Law Review's 4th issue of 2014 features articles and essays from recognized legal scholars, as well as extensive student research. Contents include: Articles: • The Legal Salience of Taxation, by Andrew T. Hayashi • Tax-Loss Mechanisms, by Jacob Nussim & Avraham Tabbach • Regulating Systemic Risk in Insurance, by Daniel Schwarcz & Steven L. Schwarcz • American Constitutional Exceptionalism Revisited, by Mila Versteeg & Emily Zackin Comments: • Bursting the Speech Bubble: Toward a More Fitting Perceived-Affiliation Standard, by Nicholas A. Caselli • Payments to Not Parent? Noncustodial Parents as the Recipients of Child Support, by Emma J. Cone-Roddy • Too Small to Fail: A New Perspective on Environmental Penalties for Small Businesses, by Nicholas S. Dufau • Understanding Equal Sovereignty, by Abigail B. Molitor • "Widespread" Uncertainty: The Exclusionary Rule in Civil-Removal Proceedings, by Michael J. O’Brien • Clogged Conduits: A Defendant's Right to Confront His Translated Statements, by Casen B. Ross • "Integral" Decisionmaking: Judicial Interpretation of Predispute Arbitration Agreements Naming the National Arbitration Forum, by Daniel A. Sito Volume 81, Number 4 also features Review Essays by Lisa Bernstein, Avery W. Katz, and Eyal Zamir, analyzing three recent books on contract law and theory.

The Origins of American Constitutionalism


Author: Donald S. Lutz
Publisher: Lsu Press
ISBN: 9780807115060
Category: History
Page: 178
View: 5853

Continue Reading →

In The Origins of American Constitutionalism, Donald S. Lutz challenges the prevailing notion that the United States Constitution was either essentially inherited from the British or simply invented by the Federalists in the summer of 1787. His political theory of constitutionalism acknowledges the contributions of the British and the Federalists. Lutz also asserts, however, that the U.S. Constitution derives in form and content from a tradition of American colonial characters and documents of political foundation that began a century and a half prior to 1787. Lutz builds his argument around a close textual analysis of such documents as the Mayflower Compact, the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut, the Rode Island Charter of 1663, the first state constitutions, the Declaration of Independence, and the Articles of Confederation. He shows that American Constitutionalism developed to a considerable degree from radical Protestant interpretations of the Judeo-Christian tradition that were first secularized into political compacts and then incorporated into constitutions and bills of rights. Over time, appropriations that enriched this tradition included aspects of English common law and English Whig theory. Lutz also looks at the influence of Montesquieu, Locke, Blackstone, and Hume. In addition, he details the importance of Americans' experiences and history to the political theory that produced the Constitution. By placing the Constitution within this broader constitutional system, Lutz demonstrates that the document is the culmination of a long process and must be understood within this context. His argument also offers a fresh view of current controversies over the Framers' intentions, the place of religion in American politics, and citizens' continuing role in the development of the constitutional tradition.