Diplomacy


Author: Henry Kissinger
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0671510991
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 912
View: 2714

Continue Reading →

Offering a panoramic view of history and a description of firsthand diplomatic encounters, the former Secretary of State describes his ideas about diplomacy and power balances, showing how national negotiating styles influence outcomes

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Diplomacy


Author: Andrew F. Cooper,Jorge Heine,Ramesh Thakur
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199588864
Category: Political Science
Page: 953
View: 485

Continue Reading →

Including chapters from some of the leading experts in the field this Handbook provides a full overview of the nature and challenges of modern diplomacy and includes a tour d'horizon of the key ways in which the theory and practice of modern diplomacy are evolving in the 21st Century.

Independent Diplomat

Despatches from an Unaccountable Elite
Author: Ross
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1787380394
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 1863

Continue Reading →

Independent Diplomat is a compelling insider’s account of the foreign policy world. Carne Ross was a diplomat on the front line of today’s most pressing issues, from Israel/Palestine to Afghanistan and Iraq, over which he resigned from the British Foreign Office. He was trained to see the world through a prism of states and interests, but the reality of his negotiations revealed very different — more complex, and more human — forces at play. Independent Diplomat exposes this fundamental weakness of institutional diplomacy: exclusion of those most affected by its outcomes, whether at the UN, the EU or within national foreign ministries. Illustrated with vivid episodes from his career — from New York to Kabul — Ross offers a refreshing critique of contemporary diplomacy and of how to put it right.

Diplomacy

Communication and the Origins of International Order
Author: Robert F. Trager
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108327087
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 943

Continue Reading →

How do adversaries communicate? How do diplomatic encounters shape international orders and determine whether states go to war? Diplomacy, from alliance politics to nuclear brinkmanship, almost always operates through a few forms of signaling: choosing the scope of demands on another state, risking a breach in relations, encouraging a protégé, staking one's reputation, or making a diplomatic approach all convey specific sorts of information. Through rich history and analyses of diplomatic network data from the Confidential Print of the British Empire, Trager demonstrates the lasting effects that diplomatic encounters have on international affairs. The Concert of Europe, the perceptions of existential threat that formed before the World Wars, the reduction in Cold War tensions known as détente, and the institutional structure of the current world order were all products of inferences about intentions drawn from the statements of individuals represented as the will of states. Diplomacy explains how closed-door conversations create stable orders and violent wars.

Arts of Power

Statecraft and Diplomacy
Author: Charles W. Freeman
Publisher: 成甲書房
ISBN: 9781878379658
Category: Political Science
Page: 159
View: 9222

Continue Reading →

Statecraft, or the art of conducting a state's affairs with other states, is as old as human civilization. So too is diplomacy, the form statecraft takes in time of peace.In this comprehensive treatment, distinguished diplomat Chas Freeman describes the fundamental principles of the art of statecraft and the craft of diplomacy. The book draws on the author's years of experience as a practicing diplomat but also his extensive reading of the histories of ancient India, China, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, and the Islamic world as well as modern Europe, Asia, and the Americas.Among numerous other subjects, the book addresses the role of intelligence, political actions, cultural influence, economic measures, and military power, as well as diplomatic strategy and tactics, negotiation, and the tasks and skills of diplomacy.

Satow's Diplomatic Practice


Author: Ivor Roberts
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198739109
Category: Law
Page: 747
View: 5638

Continue Reading →

First published in 1917, this book has long been hailed as a classic and authoritative text. This edition builds on the revision in the sixth edition, and, in recognition of the speed of changes in the field over the last ten years, examines the developments and challenges of modern diplomacy through new chapters on human rights and public/digital diplomacy.

Embassies to China

Diplomacy and Cultural Encounters Before the Opium Wars
Author: Michael Keevak
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9811039720
Category: History
Page: 162
View: 8868

Continue Reading →

This text is a timely and wide-ranging study providing essential background to the development of global modernity through the European encounter with China. Considering differing notions of peace, empire, trade, religion, and diplomacy as touchstones in the relations between China and Europe on mutuality, the book examines five encounters with France, Portugal, Holland, the pope, and Russia between 1248 and 1720, and reflects on concepts that the West took for granted but which did not successfully cross over into the Chinese world. This cutting edge text provides key insights into the cultural and political conflict which lay at the heart of early Chinese-European relations, as the West's understanding of the truth and appropriateness of its cultural norms was confronted by China's norms and beliefs.

Diplomacy

Theory and Practice
Author: G. R. Berridge
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137445521
Category: Political Science
Page: 296
View: 475

Continue Reading →

Fully revised and updated, this comprehensive guide to diplomacy explores the art of negotiating international agreements and the channels through which such activities occur when states are in diplomatic relations, and when they are not. This new edition includes chapters on secret intelligence and economic and commercial diplomacy.

A History of Diplomacy


Author: Jeremy Black
Publisher: Reaktion Books
ISBN: 1861897227
Category: History
Page: 296
View: 6287

Continue Reading →

In A History of Diplomacy, historian Jeremy Black investigates how a form of courtly negotiation and information-gathering in the early modern period developed through increasing globalization into a world-shaping force in twenty-first-century politics. The monarchic systems of the sixteenth century gave way to the colonial development of European nations—which in turn were shaken by the revolutions of the eighteenth century—the rise and progression of multiple global interests led to the establishment of the modern-day international embassy system. In this detailed and engaging study of the ever-changing role of international relations, the aims, achievements, and failures of foreign diplomacy are presented along with their complete historical and cultural background.

What Diplomats Do

The Life and Work of Diplomats
Author: Sir Brian Barder
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442226366
Category: Political Science
Page: 216
View: 5226

Continue Reading →

This text describes all aspects of the life of a diplomat through various stages of a typical career. Though following a fictional diplomat, each chapter contains case studies based on the author’s thirty years of experience as a diplomat, ambassador, and high commissioner that illustrate key issues.

Great power diplomacy, 1814-1914


Author: Norman Rich
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 502
View: 9765

Continue Reading →

This survey of the foreign relations of the great powers is essentially a straightforward diplomatic history: an attempt to describe how statesmen conducted foreign policy, how they dealt with crisis situations, and how they succeeded or failed to resolve them.

World Order


Author: Henry Kissinger
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698165721
Category: Political Science
Page: 432
View: 2428

Continue Reading →

“Dazzling and instructive . . . [a] magisterial new book.” —Walter Isaacson, Time Henry Kissinger offers in World Order a deep meditation on the roots of international harmony and global disorder. Drawing on his experience as one of the foremost statesmen of the modern era—advising presidents, traveling the world, observing and shaping the central foreign policy events of recent decades—Kissinger now reveals his analysis of the ultimate challenge for the twenty-first century: how to build a shared international order in a world of divergent historical perspectives, violent conflict, proliferating technology, and ideological extremism. There has never been a true “world order,” Kissinger observes. For most of history, civilizations defined their own concepts of order. Each considered itself the center of the world and envisioned its distinct principles as universally relevant. China conceived of a global cultural hierarchy with the emperor at its pinnacle. In Europe, Rome imagined itself surrounded by barbarians; when Rome fragmented, European peoples refined a concept of an equilibrium of sovereign states and sought to export it across the world. Islam, in its early centuries, considered itself the world’s sole legitimate political unit, destined to expand indefinitely until the world was brought into harmony by religious principles. The United States was born of a conviction about the universal applicability of democracy—a conviction that has guided its policies ever since. Now international affairs take place on a global basis, and these historical concepts of world order are meeting. Every region participates in questions of high policy in every other, often instantaneously. Yet there is no consensus among the major actors about the rules and limits guiding this process or its ultimate destination. The result is mounting tension. Grounded in Kissinger’s deep study of history and his experience as national security advisor and secretary of state, World Order guides readers through crucial episodes in recent world history. Kissinger offers a unique glimpse into the inner deliberations of the Nixon administration’s negotiations with Hanoi over the end of the Vietnam War, as well as Ronald Reagan’s tense debates with Soviet Premier Gorbachev in Reykjavík. He offers compelling insights into the future of U.S.–China relations and the evolution of the European Union, and he examines lessons of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Taking readers from his analysis of nuclear negotiations with Iran through the West’s response to the Arab Spring and tensions with Russia over Ukraine, World Order anchors Kissinger’s historical analysis in the decisive events of our time. Provocative and articulate, blending historical insight with geopolitical prognostication, World Order is a unique work that could come only from a lifelong policy maker and diplomat.

Does America Need a Foreign Policy?

Toward a Diplomacy for the 21st Century
Author: Henry Kissinger
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0684855682
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 350
View: 8397

Continue Reading →

The former Secretary of State under Richard Nixon argues that a coherent foreign policy is essential and lays out his own plan for getting the nation's international affairs in order.

Choose Your Weapons

The British Foreign Secretary
Author: Douglas Hurd
Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson
ISBN: 0297858513
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 6997

Continue Reading →

Noisy popular liberal interventionism? Or a more conservative, diplomatic approach concentrating on co-operation between nations? This is the debate that lies at the heart of modern politics and Hurd traces its most interesting and influential exponents. He starts with Canning and Castelreagh in post Waterloo Britain; to a generation later, the victory of the interventionist Palmerston over Aberdeen; then to Salisbury (Imperialism) and Grey (European balance of power); and finally to Eden and Bevin who combined to lay the foundations of a post-war compromise. That delicate balance has served its purpose for over half a century, but as we enter a new era of terrorism and racial conflict, the old questions and divisions are re-surfacing . . .

Agency Change

Diplomatic Action Beyond the State
Author: John Robert Kelley
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442230622
Category: Political Science
Page: 142
View: 6143

Continue Reading →

Moving beyond standard concepts of “traditional” and “new” diplomacy, Agency Change illustrates how parallel, yet disparate diplomatic systems emerge—statesmen seeing power vis-à-vis non-state actors seeking solutions to problems—and examines different mutually beneficial solutions to this phenomenon.

Modern Diplomacy


Author: R. P. Barston
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317860241
Category: Political Science
Page: 456
View: 4277

Continue Reading →

Modern Diplomacy provides a comprehensive exploration of the evolution and concepts of the institution of diplomacy. This book equips students with a detailed analysis of important international issues that impact upon diplomacy and its relationship with international politics. The subject is bought ‘to life’ through the use of case studies and examples which highlight the working of contemporary diplomacy within the international political arena. Organised around five broad topic areas, including the nature of diplomacy, diplomatic methods and negotiation, the operation of diplomacy in specific areas and natural disasters and international conflict, the book covers all major topic areas of contemporary diplomacy.

Translating History

30 Years on the Front Lines of Diplomacy with a Top Russian Interpreter
Author: Igor Korchilov
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 068487041X
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 5691

Continue Reading →

A top Russian interpreter, who spent 30 years on the front lines of diplomacy, offers excerpts from his journals--the result of his four years spent in the service of Mikhail Gorbachev--covering the pivotal period between 1987 and 1990, and including parts of Gorbachev's conversations with Reagan, Thatcher, and Bush, among others.

Years of Upheaval


Author: Henry Kissinger
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1451636474
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 1283
View: 6465

Continue Reading →

In this second volume of Henry Kissinger’s “endlessly fascinating memoirs” (The New York Times), Kissinger recounts his years as President Nixon’s Secretary of State from 1972 to 1974, including the ending of the Vietnam War, the 1973 Middle East War and oil embargo, Watergate, and Nixon’s resignation. This second volume of Henry Kissinger’s monumental memoirs covers his years as President Richard Nixon’s Secretary of State (1972–1974), including the ending of the Vietnam War, the 1973 Middle East War and oil embargo, Watergate, and Nixon’s resignation. Years of Upheaval opens with Dr. Kissinger being appointed Secretary of State. Among other events of these turbulent years that he recounts are his trip to Hanoi after the Vietnam cease-fire, his efforts to settle the war in Cambodia, the “Year of Europe,” two Nixon-Brezhnev summit meetings and the controversies over arms control and détente, the military alert and showdown with the Soviet Union over the Middle East war, the subsequent oil crisis, the origins of shuttle diplomacy in the Middle East, the fall of Salvador Allende in Chile, and the tumultuous events surrounding Nixon’s resignation. Throughout are candid appraisals of world leaders, including Nixon, Golda Meir, Anwar Sadat, King Faisal, Hafez al-Asad, Chairman Mao, Leonid Brezhnev, Willy Brandt, Helmut Schmidt, Georges Pompidou, and many more. At once illuminating, fascinating, and profound, Years of Upheaval is a lasting contribution to the history of our time by one of its chief protagonists.

After Lavinia

A Literary History of Premodern Marriage Diplomacy
Author: John Watkins
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 1501708511
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 7345

Continue Reading →

The Renaissance jurist Alberico Gentili once quipped that, just like comedies, all wars end in a marriage. In medieval and early modern Europe, marriage treaties were a perennial feature of the diplomatic landscape. When one ruler decided to make peace with his enemy, the two parties often sealed their settlement with marriages between their respective families. In After Lavinia, John Watkins traces the history of the practice, focusing on the unusually close relationship between diplomacy and literary production in Western Europe from antiquity through the seventeenth century, when marriage began to lose its effectiveness and prestige as a tool of diplomacy. Watkins begins with Virgil's foundational myth of the marriage between the Trojan hero Aeneas and the Latin princess, an account that formed the basis for numerous medieval and Renaissance celebrations of dynastic marriages by courtly poets and propagandists. In the book's second half, he follows the slow decline of diplomatic marriage as both a tool of statecraft and a literary subject, exploring the skepticism and suspicion with which it was viewed in the works of Spenser and Shakespeare. Watkins argues that the plays of Corneille and Racine signal the passing of an international order that had once accorded women a place of unique dignity and respect.