Detroit Muscle

Factory Lightweights and Purpose-Built Muscle Cars
Author: Charles Morris
Publisher: CarTech Inc
ISBN: 161325301X
Category: Transportation
Page: 192
View: 6120

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The muscle car era, and the era that immediately preceded it, are a unique window in time; it is one that we will not likely see again. Post-war USA was a place where people wanted to move on from the horrors of conflict, to embrace an era of peace, and to pursue, well, all sorts of things. A whole generation was entering a new prosperity, with home ownership on the rise, gainful employment increasing, the building of suburbs, and a new interstate system connecting everyone. That all helped increase our dependence upon, and in turn, deepen our love affair with the automobile. It started in the 1950s, when automakers realized that if they made their cars more powerful than brand X and won races on the weekends as well, sales would follow those victories into the dealership. Not everybody was enamored with all this new-found performance, however, and throughout the late 1950s and early 1960s, a struggle developed between building faster automobiles and appearing responsible and promoting the cause of safety. This led to racing participation on an all-out corporate level, followed by voluntary self-imposed and publicized bans, back-door cheating on said bans, and then investing in performance again. A byproduct of all this activity was some really fascinating and exciting cars. It began with standard-chassis cars growing bigger and including more powerful engines. Then they graduated to being lighter, putting big engines into mid-size chassis (muscle cars), and building race cars that barely resembled anything on the street. Detroit Muscle: Factory Lightweights and Purpose-Built Muscle Cars follows the evolution of the fastest, most powerful, and exciting vehicles of the era, in both drag racing and NASCAR. From early Hudson Hornets, to the birth of the Hemi, to aluminum and fiberglass panel sedans, to lightweight special-order muscle cars ready to race from the factory. p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial}

Collecting Muscle Car Model Kits


Author: Tim Boyd
Publisher: CarTech Inc
ISBN: 1613253958
Category: Crafts & Hobbies
Page: 176
View: 9012

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In the 1960s, model kit building was a huge hobby. Kids built plastic kits of planes, tanks, race cars, space ships, creatures from scary movies, you name it. Before baseball card collecting, Pokémon, and video games, model kit building was one of the most popular hobby activities. Car and airplane kits were the most popular, and among the car kits, muscle cars, as we know them today, were one of the most popular categories. Many owners of real muscle cars today were not old enough to buy them when the cars were new, of course. Yet kids of the 1960s and 1970s worshiped these cars to an extent completely foreign to kids today. If you couldn’t afford or were too young to buy a muscle car back then, what could you do? For many, the next best thing was to buy, collect, and build muscle car kits from a variety of kit companies. Hundreds were made. Many of these kits have become collectible today, especially in original, unassembled form. Although people still build kits today, there is a broad market for collectors of nostalgic model kits. People love the kits for the great box art, to rekindle fond memories of building them 40 years ago, or even as a companion to the full-scale cars they own today. Here, world-leading authority Tim Boyd takes you through the entire era of muscle car kits, covering the options, collectability, variety availability, and value of these wonderful kits today. Boyd also takes you through the differences between the original kits, the older reproduction kits, and the new reproduction kits that many people find at swap meets today. If you are looking to build a collection of muscle car kits, interested in getting the kits of your favorite manufacturer or even just of the cars you have owned, this book will be a valuable resource in your model kit search.

The Definitive Chevelle SS Guide 1964-1972

Facts, Figures and Features of Chevrolet's Legendary Muscle Car
Author: Dale McIntosh
Publisher: CarTech Inc
ISBN: 1613253656
Category: Transportation
Page: 192
View: 9131

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Chevelles have always carried a certain aura about them. As Chevrolet's entry into the mid-sized muscle car market, they provided high sales numbers across many platforms as Chevrolet won the manufacturers crown six of nine years from 1964 to 1972. At the tip of the Chevrolet sales spear resided the Chevelle SS. Beginning in 1969, the Chevelle SS was no longer its own model and was relegated to being an option package. Hence, it can become difficult to determine if a 1969–1972 model was ordered from the factory with Super Sport equipment. Author and noted Chevelle expert Dale McIntosh discusses each model in a year-by-year format, providing correct information on what was and wasn't part of the Malibu SS, SS396, and SS-optioned Chevelle. Crucial to this is a firm understanding of plant-by-plant variances along with mid-year changes that he has identified to make your Chevelle SS factory correct. Rarely does a book offer this much hard data in an easy and concise read. You will be confident that your Chevelle SS is as original as possible.

Creative Industries of Detroit

The Untold Story of Detroit's Secret Concept Car Builder
Author: Leon Dixon
Publisher: CarTech Inc
ISBN: 1613252137
Category: Transportation
Page: 192
View: 6361

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As America entered the postwar 1950s a resurgence by the auto manufacturers enabled them to create the most eccentric and extravagant automobiles of all time. Fierce competition between designers from General Motors, Ford, Chrysler, and independents such as Packard all turned to one car builder nestled firmly in America's bustling automotive mecca to help design the most elaborate prototype and concept cars ever: Creative Industries of Detroit. Author Leon Dixon's comprehensive account chronicles the greatest automotive achievements constructed at Creative Industries of Detroit. The careers of the company's founder, Fred Johnson, and his successor, Rex Terry, are examined to show how two former Chrysler employees led the most diverse automotive firm in all of Detroit. Dream cars created and examined in great detail include the Ford Atmos-FX, Mercury XM-800, Dodge Granada, Packard Balboa, Packard Panthers, Packard Request, Ford Mystere, Corvette Corvair, Dodge Daytona, Plymouth Superbird, Delorean, and many more. An amazing amount of hardware was constructed, each make separate from the other, and with a high level of secrecy. Creative Industries of Detroit: The Untold Story of Detroit's Secret Concept Car Builder offers the most exhaustive and complete account of the 40-plus-year history creating dream, prototype, concept, and one-off cars from Dwight D. Eisenhower's 1950 Presidential Lincoln Limousine to the 1993 Mustang Mach III concept cars. This all-inclusive book is the first-ever on the subject, and features behind-the-scenes images and interviews never published before. p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial}

Factory Lightweights

Detroit's Drag Racing Specials of the 1960s
Author: Charles Morris
Publisher: Cartech Incorporated
ISBN: 9781932494440
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 179
View: 914

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Factory Lightweights: Detroit’s Drag Racing Specials of the ‘60s chronicles these rare cars that still inspire admirers and imitators today. Cars like the Ford Fairlane 427 Thunderbolt, Pontiac’s Super Duty Catalina, Dyno Don Nicholson’s Chevy II Wagon, and a whole assortment of Hemi-powered Mopars sit at the top of the heap when you’re talking about the fastest American musclecars produced during the 1960s. Few of these cars were produced and very few still survive today.

Kar-Kraft

Race Cars, Prototypes and Muscle Cars of Ford's Specialty Vehicle Activity Program
Author: Charlie Henry
Publisher: CarTech Inc
ISBN: 1613252862
Category: Transportation
Page: 192
View: 9952

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The story of Kar-Kraft began, as did many others in the automotive industry, with an axe to grind. In 1963, Ford was seriously interested in purchasing Ferrari. Ferrari was a legendary brand with considerable success in racing, and Ford saw the acquisition as a great way to be instantly successful in the racing arena. When Enzo Ferrari realized that Ford would not give him complete control of the racing program, he backed out of the deal late in the process. Ford had spent millions in vetting and audits, which then set in motion a vengeful response against Ferrari. The result was the unthinkable: Ford beat Ferrari at Le Mans. Ford wanted to become competitive quickly, but it did not have the race history or resources in house. To remedy the situation, Ford searched the U.K. for an independent company to help accelerate its race car development. It first settled on Lola Cars and set up Ford Advanced Vehicles. Later, Ford brought its LeMans effort to the U.S. and the Kar-Kraft relationship was established. Although Kar-Kraft was technically an independent company, it really only had one customer: Ford Special Vehicles. Kar-Kraft's story doesn't begin and end with the GT 40 that took the win away from Ferrari at Le Mans. Ford expanded upon the program and organized an all-out assault on racing in general. Cars were prepared for Trans-Am, NASCAR, NHRA, and Can-Am competition. Street versions of the Boss 429 were assembled under its roof. And fabled prototypes including the LID Mustang, Boss 302 Maverick, and Mach 2C were all assembled in Ford's contracted race shop. And then, out of the blue, its doors closed for good on a cold day in 1970. History tells us that Ford won Le Mans, the Daytona 500, and the Trans-Am championship. But it doesn't tell us how this was accomplished. Author Charlie Henry (a former Kar-Kraft employee) has enlisted the help of many of his former co-workers to bring you the very first book ever published on Ford's all-encompassing special projects facility, Kar-Kraft. p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial}

Woodward Avenue

Cruising the Legendary Strip
Author: Robert Genat
Publisher: CarTech Inc
ISBN: 1613250916
Category: Transportation
Page: 158
View: 7877

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Detroit's Woodward Avenue was America's center of gravity for cruising and street racing in the '50s and '60s. Its widely paved surfaces with long sections of arrow-straight road between traffic signals provided the ideal location for stoplight street racing and cruising action. Woodward even became the unofficial test track for the profusion of hot factory iron churned out by Detroit's engineers. If you lived in the Detroit area in the '60s and wanted to drag race, Woodward Avenue was the place to go. Woodward Avenue: Cruising the Legendary Stripis filled with stories from the people who cruised and raced Woodward in that wonderful era. Also featured are the clandestine and not-so-clandestine efforts by the factories to build cars that the Woodward crowd would buy and race. Woodward Avenueincludes everything that surrounded Woodward's action, including Detroit's legendary DJs who provided the cruisers' musical soundtrack, the hang-outs and drive-ins, the new car dealerships that provided the high-performance cars, and the legendary speed shops that provided the hot rod parts. If you are into muscle cars, great street racing stories, or just want to remember or learn how it was back in the day, Woodward Avenue: Cruising the Legendary Stripis a great trip down memory lane.

The Complete Book of Classic Chevrolet Muscle Cars

1955-1974
Author: Mike Mueller
Publisher: Motorbooks International
ISBN: 076035233X
Category: Transportation
Page: 176
View: 2450

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"The Complete Book of Classic Chevy Muscle Cars covers the primary muscle and performance cars produced by Chevrolet in the 60s and 70s, such as the Camaro and Malibu"--

How to Rebuild Big-Block Ford Engines


Author: Charles Morris
Publisher: CarTech Inc
ISBN: 1932494928
Category: Transportation
Page: 144
View: 2408

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All engines are covered in full detail in this Workbench series rebuild volume. Included are step-by-step heavily illustrated instructions, that walk you through the entire process of rebuilding your Ford engine. If you want to breathe new life into your tired old Ford engine, this is the book for you.

Muscle Car Source Book

All the Facts, Figures, Statistics, and Production Numbers
Author: Mike Mueller
Publisher: Motorbooks International
ISBN: 076034857X
Category: Transportation
Page: 240
View: 7391

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"Muscle Car Source Book is a muscle car buff's encyclopedia that chronicles the how's why's, and when's of American muscle car manufacturers like Dodge, Plymouth, Ford, and more"--

American Muscle Cars

A Full-Throttle History
Author: Darwin Holmstrom
Publisher: Motorbooks
ISBN: 0760350981
Category: Transportation
Page: 224
View: 5868

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This is the muscle car history to own--a richly illustrated chronicle of America's greatest high-performance cars, told from their 1960s beginning through the present day! In the 1960s, three incendiary ingredients--developing V-8 engine technology, a culture consumed by the need for speed, and 75 million baby boomers entering the auto market--exploded in the form of the factory muscle car. The resulting vehicles, brutal machines unlike any the world had seen before or will ever see again, defined the sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll generation. American Muscle Cars chronicles this tumultuous period of American history through the primary tool Americans use to define themselves: their automobiles. From the street-racing hot rod culture that emerged following World War II through the new breed of muscle cars still emerging from Detroit today, this book brings to life the history of the American muscle car. When Pontiac's chief engineer, John Z. DeLorean, and his team bolted a big-inch engine into the division's intermediate chassis, they immediately invented the classic muscle car. In those 20 minutes it took Bill Collins and Russ Gee to bolt a 389 ci V-8 engine into a Tempest chassis they created the prototype for Pontiac's GTO--and changed the course of automotive history. From that moment on, American performance cars would never be the same. American Muscle Cars tells the story of the most desirable cars ever to come out of Detroit. It's a story of flat-out insanity told at full throttle and illustrated with beautiful photography.

Muscle Car Barn Finds

Rusty Road Runners, Abandoned AMXs, Crusty Camaros and More!
Author: Ryan Brutt
Publisher: Motorbooks International
ISBN: 076035359X
Category: Transportation
Page: 160
View: 7922

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It’s no secret among car collectors and enthusiast that the pursuit of “lost” cars is what drives many gearheads. Finding an abandoned, restorable car is one of the most common dreams among collectors and a touchstone for the hobby. Top shows like the Pebble Beach Concours and Chicago’s Muscle Car and Corvette Nationals have added special classes devoted to original and barn find vehicles. Author and photographer Ryan Brutt is the “automotive archaeologist”, author of the CarsInBarns blog, and a monthly columnist for Hot Rod magazine. Brutt has selected his best muscle car images for Muscle Car Barn Finds. No searching the back roads required--just kick up your feet and begin your barn-finding adventure by turning the page. These old warriors aren’t dead, just resting. A drive in the country or through a small-town back street will reveal them lurking under tarps, hidden behind garage doors, stashed behind fences from prying eyes.

Isky

Ed Iskenderian and the History of Hot Rodding
Author: Matt Stone
Publisher: CarTech Inc
ISBN: 1613252900
Category: Transportation
Page: 208
View: 689

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p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial} To tell the life story of Ed "Isky" Iskenderian is to tell the history of hot rodding in America. Ed was there from the very beginning. Born in 1921 to first-generation Armenian immigrants, Ed's first hobby was ham radio, but like many young men in the years before World War II, his interest turned to automobiles, especially hot rods. Ed had natural skills in metal working and machining that were developed in high school. He wanted to further develop those skills, so he joined the Air Corps to continue his education and flew with Air Transport Command. By the time Ed mustered out of the service, the California hot rod scene was in full bloom, with tens of thousands of vets who had the desire to make cars go fast. Isky: Ed Iskenderian and the History of Hot Rodding, tells the whole story, from his pre-war Lake Muroc and car club activities, his service in the military, starting a small business fabricating parts and making cams in the back of a rented shop, and then selling cams to other rodders. It covers how he grew a business from a single cam grinder and became the leading cam authority in barely 10 years. Ed was a gifted machinist, and he also had a natural knack for promotion. He purchased an ad in the second issue of Hot Rod magazine, sensing something big; his instincts, as always, were right. He was also the first to use T-shirts and uniforms as promotion. Not only was he an early pioneer in the industry for print adverting and catalogs, he was also among the first to understand the value of having successful race cars using his cams in their engines and wearing his decals on their fenders. The biggest names in the racing industry were running Isky cams, and Ed made sure the world knew it. Ed's company name went on to become one of the household names in the performance community. His continued success is an entertaining tale of mingling with industry icons, insight into the business of hot rodding, great stories of yesterday and today, and a life very well lived. You will enjoy the stories recorded here as much as Ed "Isky" Iskenderian seems to enjoy telling them.

The Cars of Harley Earl


Author: David W Temple
Publisher: CarTech Inc
ISBN: 161325234X
Category: Transportation
Page: 192
View: 3512

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At 6-foot, 3-inches tall, Harley Earl was an imposing figure, but his true stature lies in his towering talent for automotive design and styling. Over his 50-year career, he created as well as collaborated on the most innovative, bold, technologically advanced cars made by General Motors. As a titan of American auto design, the cars he helped create are still celebrated today. And as an enduring legacy, he inspired a generation of engineers, designers, and stylists. Veteran automotive historian David W. Temple has researched and unearthed the complete story of Harley Earl’s cars, his notable design achievements, and many accolades. Working as a coachbuilder at his father's Earl Automotive Works in Hollywood, California, the young Earl learned his trade. After styling the 1927 LaSalle for GM president Alfred P. Sloan, Earl rose to prominence and ran the newly created department of Art and Color. Automobile design stagnated during the Depression and World War II, but the number of his contributions to the automotive world in the 1950s is staggering. When the jet age hit, he fully embraced aviation design and infused it into GM cars. The Buick Y-Job and GM Le Sabre featured many firsts in automotive design and hardware. The Y-Job's fender extensions trailing over the doors, disappearing headlamps, flush door handles, a metal cover over the convertible top were a few innovations. When General Motors needed to show off its cars and technology, Harley Earl-designed cars were the stars of the Motorama show that toured the country from 1949 to 1961. He led the team that created the 1953 Corvette, and this iconic American sports car is still going strong today. He was involved in the creation of the 1955-1957 Chevy Bel Air, otherwise known as the Tri-Five Chevy. Harley Earl's drive toward bold and innovative design spurred American car design during the mid-twentieth century. His distinctive designs defined the 1950s finned cars and set American automotive design on the path it has followed into the modern era. With this in-depth examination, you learn the inside story of these remarkable cars and the man behind them. It’s an essential addition to any automotive library.

The Complete Book of Classic Dodge and Plymouth Muscle

Every Model from 1960 to 1974
Author: Mike Mueller
Publisher: Motorbooks
ISBN: 9780760344774
Category: Transportation
Page: 288
View: 5096

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From lifelong car enthusiast and photographer Mike Mueller comes the most expansive overview of Chrysler Corporation’s muscle cars ever published. It’s no secret that Dodge and Plymouth have been responsible for some of history’s most iconic muscle cars— a resume including the immortal Road Runner, Dodge Daytona, Hemi ’Cuda, Challenger T/A, Charger, Super Bee, Super Bird, and GTX. These cars, often referred to as “Mopars” (short for “Motor Parts,” Chrysler’s parts division), defined the golden age of the American muscle car. They earned the “Motor” part of the Mopar name by housing the most robust engines of the period: legendary power plants like the original Firepower Hemi, the Max Wedge, the 440 Super Commando, and the famed Street Hemi. Even their small V8s, like the 340 LA-series engine that powered the AAR ’Cuda, are the stuff of motorhead folklore. In The Complete Book of Classic Dodge and Plymouth Muscle, they’re all here: every car and every engine from the classic era. This gorgeously illustrated work takes readers through the fifty-plus-year history of Mopar performance, from the Hemi-powered 300 Series through the last cars produced before rising gas prices, tightened emissions, and outrageous insurance rates brought the curtain down on American muscle car production. Author/photographer Mike Mueller offers an in-depth look at the specialty driving machines that have made Mopar performance an enduring part of American automotive culture for over half a century. With extensive details, specs, and spectacular photographs, Mueller’s book stands alone as the ultimate resource on America’s muscle cars.

Steve Magnante's 1001 Mustang Facts

Covers All Mustangs 1964-1/2 to Present
Author: Steve Magnante
Publisher: CarTech Inc
ISBN: 1613252722
Category: Transportation
Page: 336
View: 7266

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Author Steve Magnante is well known for his encyclopedia-like knowledge of automotive facts. The details he regularly shares, both in the pages of national magazines and as a contributing host and tech expert at the popular Barrett-Jackson Auctions on television, are the kinds of details that car fanatics love to hear. Many feel that these facts are among the highlights of television auction coverage, much more interesting than the final hammer price. Steve turns his attention to the most popular car in history, the Ford Mustang. In more than 50 years, the Mustang has taken many turns, from the original pony car, to variants that are best described as pure muscle cars, to the misunderstood Mustang II, to the Fox-Body platform that revived the brand, all the way to the modern Coyote- and Voodoo-powered supercars. Magnante covers them all here, generation by generation, so that Mustang fans of any generation are sure to love this collection. Whether you're an avid fan of all Mustangs, a trivia buff who wants to stump your friends, or have a particular affinity for a particular era of Mustangs, this book is an informative and entertaining collection of facts from one of the industry's most beloved and respected sources. Add this copy to your collection today.

Muscle Cars

Kings of the Street from the Golden Era
Author: Publications International Ltd. Staff
Publisher: Publications International
ISBN: 9781412715225
Category: Muscle cars
Page: 190
View: 2959

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A car-by-car look at the machines that define the muscle era. Told with lively text and simple, fact-filled charts.

Maximum Performance

Mopar Super Stock Drag Racing 1962 - 1969
Author: Jim Schild
Publisher: Motorbooks International
ISBN: 0760355657
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 160
View: 4859

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Since the early days or racing, Chrysler, Dodge, and Plymouth have dominated drag strips and race tracks. During 1955 alone, Chrysler 300s won 37 major stock car races and clinched both the NASCAR and AAA stock car championships. Although the impressive engine options of 1950s consistently out-performed the competition, they were a mere opening act for the extremes of performance that would be unleashed throughout the 1960s--the golden era of drag racing and factory super-performance cars. Maximum Performance: Super Stock Drag Racing 1962-1969 details Chrysler's amazing dominance in this era. Its drivers were among drag racing's first paid professional racers, and this book covers the complete story of Mopar drag racing accompanied by historical imagery as well as contemporary photos. This is the real story behind Super Stock and Factory Experimental drag racing as told the people who lived it!

The Art of Mopar

Chrysler, Dodge, and Plymouth Muscle Cars
Author: Tom Glatch
Publisher: Motorbooks
ISBN: 0760359717
Category: Transportation
Page: 224
View: 2736

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The history of Chrysler Corporation is, in many ways, a history of a company floundering from one financial crisis to the next. While that has given shareholders fits for nearly a century, it has also motivated the Pentastar company to create some of the most outrageous, and collectible, cars ever built in the United States. From the moment Chrysler unleashed the Firepower hemi V-8 engine on the world for the 1951 model year, they had been cranking out the most powerful engines on the market. Because the company pioneered the use of lightweight unibody technology, it had the stiffest, lightest bodies in which to put those most powerful engines, and that is the basic muscle-car formula: add one powerful engine to one light car. When the muscle car era exploded onto the scene, Chrysler unleashed the mighty Mopar muscle cars, the Dodges and Plymouths that defined the era. Fabled nameplates like Charger, Road Runner, Super Bee, 'Cuda, and Challenger defined the era and rank among the most valuable collector cars ever produced by an American automaker. Featuring cars from the incomparable Brothers' Collection, The Art of Mopar: Chrysler, Dodge, and Plymouth Muscle Cars celebrates these cars in studio portraits using the light-painting process perfected by Tom Loeser. It is the ultimate portrayal of the ultimate muscle cars.

1969 Plymouth Road Runner


Author: Wes Eisenschenk
Publisher: CarTech Inc
ISBN: 1613253028
Category: Transportation
Page: 96
View: 7306

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The late 1960s was an interesting time in the automotive world. Muscle cars, as we now know them, were well established, with all manufacturers joining the horsepower race. You could walk into the showroom for any brand from any manufacturer and find a variety of performance models. Competition being what it is, the manufacturers were looking for ways other than winning races to lure buyers into the showrooms and entice them to buy their products. Some tried to accomplish this with fancy marketing schemes and graphic paint packages and decals, and for the first time, some tried to win over buyers with price. Volume No. 5 of CarTech's In Detail series covers the 1969 Plymouth Road Runner. It was an interesting marriage of a car that attempted to appeal to potential buyers with a low cost, light weight, and potent bare-bones package. It also added a brilliant marketing strategy of partnering with a famous studio and a popular cartoon character. The end result was a wildly popular, big-block, affordable muscle car with great graphics and a cool beep-beep horn. The public loved it. All In Detail Series books include an introduction and historical overview, an explanation of the design and concepts involved in creating the car, a look at marketing and promotion, and an in-depth study of all hardware and available options, as well as an examination of where the car is on the market today. Also included is an appendix of paint and option codes, VIN and build-tag decoders, as well as production numbers.