Dark Sun

The Making Of The Hydrogen Bomb
Author: Richard Rhodes
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 143912647X
Category: History
Page: 736
View: 8772

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Here, for the first time, in a brilliant, panoramic portrait by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Making of the Atomic Bomb, is the definitive, often shocking story of the politics and the science behind the development of the hydrogen bomb and the birth of the Cold War. Based on secret files in the United States and the former Soviet Union, this monumental work of history discloses how and why the United States decided to create the bomb that would dominate world politics for more than forty years.

Viele Welten

Hugh Everett III - ein Familiendrama zwischen kaltem Krieg und Quantenphysik
Author: Peter Byrne
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 364225179X
Category: Philosophy
Page: 551
View: 4043

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Peter Byrne erzählt die Lebensgeschichte von Hugh Everett III (1930–1982), dessen Theorie der multiplen Universen die Physik und Philosophie entscheidend beeinflusst hat. Neben seiner berühmten Interpretation der Quantenmechanik verfasste Everett eine klassische Arbeit zur Spieltheorie, entwickelte wegweisende Computeralgorithmen und leistete Pionierarbeit auf dem Gebiet der Künstlichen Intelligenz. Diesem anschaulichen Porträt liegen bisher unveröffentlichte Schriften Everetts zugrunde sowie Interviews mit Freunden, Kollegen und Verwandten.

The First War of Physics: The Secret History of the Atom Bomb, 1939-1949


Author: Jim Baggott
Publisher: Pegasus Books
ISBN: 1605987697
Category: History
Page: 584
View: 2798

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An epic story of science and technology at the very limits of human understanding: the monumental race to build the first atomic weapons. Rich in personality, action, confrontation, and deception, The First War of Physics is the first fully realized popular account of the race to build humankind's most destructive weapon. The book draws on declassified material, such as MI6's Farm Hall transcripts, coded soviet messages cracked by American cryptographers in the Venona project, and interpretations by Russian scholars of documents from the soviet archives. Jim Baggott weaves these threads into a dramatic narrative that spans ten historic years, from the discovery of nuclear fission in 1939 to the aftermath of 'Joe-1,’ August 1949's first Soviet atomic bomb test. Why did physicists persist in developing the atomic bomb, despite the devastation that it could bring? Why, despite having a clear head start, did Hitler's physicists fail? Could the soviets have developed the bomb without spies like Klaus Fuchs or Donald Maclean? Did the allies really plot to assassinate a key member of the German bomb program? Did the physicists knowingly inspire the arms race? The First War of Physics is a grand and frightening story of scientific ambition, intrigue, and genius: a tale barely believable as fiction, which just happens to be historical fact.

Brotherhood of the Bomb

The Tangled Lives and Loyalties of Robert Oppenheimer, Ernest Lawrence, and Edward Teller
Author: Gregg Herken
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 1466851554
Category: History
Page: 464
View: 986

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The fascinating story of the men who founded the nuclear age, fully told for the first time The story of the twentieth century is largely the story of the power of science and technology. Within that story is the incredible tale of the human conflict between Robert Oppenheimer, Ernest Lawrence, and Edward Teller-the scientists most responsible for the advent of weapons of mass destruction. How did science-and its practitioners-enlisted in the service of the state during the Second World War, become a slave to its patron during the Cold War? The story of these three men, builders of the bombs, is fundamentally about loyalty-to country, to science, and to each other-and about the wrenching choices that had to be made when these allegiances came into conflict. Gregg Herken gives us the behind-the-scenes account based upon a decade of research, interviews, and newly released Freedom of Information Act and Russian documents. Brotherhood of the Bomb is a vital slice of American history told authoritatively-and grippingly-for the first time.

The History of American Foreign Policy From 1895


Author: Jerald A. Combs
Publisher: M.E. Sharpe
ISBN: 0765633523
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 944

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This affordable text offers a clear, concise and readable narrative and analytical history of American foreign policy since the Spanish-American War. Special attention is given to the controversial issues and contrasting views that surround major wars and foreign policy decisions that the United States has made from 1895 to the present. The book narrates events and policies but goes further to emphasize the international setting and constraints within which American policy-makers had to operate, the domestic pressures on those policy-makers, and the ideologies, preferences, and personal idiosyncrasies of the leaders themselves.

Bomb

The Race to Build--and Steal--the World's Most Dangerous Weapon
Author: Steve Sheinkin
Publisher: Flash Point
ISBN: 1596438614
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 272
View: 881

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In December of 1938, a chemist in a German laboratory made a shocking discovery: When placed next to radioactive material, a Uranium atom split in two. That simple discovery launched a scientific race that spanned 3 continents. In Great Britain and the United States, Soviet spies worked their way into the scientific community; in Norway, a commando force slipped behind enemy lines to attack German heavy-water manufacturing; and deep in the desert, one brilliant group of scientists was hidden away at a remote site at Los Alamos. This is the story of the plotting, the risk-taking, the deceit, and genius that created the world's most formidable weapon. This is the story of the atomic bomb. Bomb is a 2012 National Book Awards finalist for Young People's Literature. Bomb is a 2012 Washington Post Best Kids Books of the Year title. Bomb is a 2013 Newbery Honor book.

Brezhnev and the Decline of the Soviet Union


Author: Thomas Crump
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134669224
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 6707

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Leonid Brezhnev was leader of the Soviet Union from 1964-1982, a longer period than any other Soviet leader apart from Stalin. During Brezhnev’s time Soviet power seemed at its height and increasing. Living standards were rising, the Soviet Union was a nuclear power and successful in its space missions, and the Soviet Union's influence reached into all part of the world. Yet, as this book, which provides a comprehensive overview and reassessment of Brezhnev’s life, early political career and career as leader, shows, the seeds of decline were sown in Brezhnev's time. There was a huge over-commitment of resources to the Soviet industrial-military complex and to massively expensive foreign policy overstretch. At the same time there was a failure to deliver on citizens' rising expectations, and an overconfident ignoring of dissidents and their demands. The book will be of great interest to Russian specialists, and also to scholars of international relations and world history.

The Twilight of the Bombs

Recent Challenges, New Dangers, and the Prospects for a World Without Nuclear Weapons
Author: Richard Rhodes
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307593738
Category: Political Science
Page: 352
View: 6136

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The culminating volume in Richard Rhodes’s monumental and prizewinning history of nuclear weapons, offering the first comprehensive narrative of the challenges faced in a post–Cold War age. The past twenty years have transformed our relationship with nuclear weapons drastically. With extraordinary depth of knowledge and understanding, Rhodes makes clear how the five original nuclear powers—Russia, Great Britain, France, China, and especially the United States—have struggled with new realities. He shows us how the stage was set for a second tragic war when Iraq secretly destroyed its nuclear infrastructure and reveals the real reasons George W. Bush chose to fight a second war in Iraq. We see how the efforts of U.S. weapons labs laid the groundwork for nuclear consolidation in the former Soviet Union, how and why South Africa secretly built and then destroyed a small nuclear arsenal, and how Jimmy Carter’s private diplomacy prevented another Korean War. We also see how the present day represents a nuclear turning point and what hope exists for our future. Rhodes assesses the emerging threat of nuclear terrorism and offers advice on how our complicated relationships with North Korea and South Asia should evolve. Finally, he imagines what a post-nuclear world might look like, suggesting what might make it possible. Powerful and persuasive, The Twilight of the Bombs is an essential work of contemporary history. From the Hardcover edition.

Command and Control

Die Atomwaffenarsenale der USA und die Illusion der Sicherheit
Author: Eric Schlosser
Publisher: C.H.Beck
ISBN: 3406655963
Category: Political Science
Page: 598
View: 6333

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Arkansas, 18. September 1980, abends: Bei Routinearbeiten an einer gefechtsbereiten Titan-II-Rakete rutscht einem Arbeiter ein Schraubenschlüssel aus der Hand. »O Mann, das ist nicht gut”, ist sein erster Gedanke. Das Missgeschick führt zu einer Kettenreaktion, der größte je gebaute Atomsprengkopf droht zu explodieren ... Weltweit sind Tausende von Atomsprengköpfen stationiert. Viele von ihnen werden rund um die Uhr gefechtsbereit gehalten, damit sie innerhalb einer Minute starten und eine unvorstellbare Verwüstung anrichten können. Was das für die Soldaten in den unterirdischen Bunkern heißt und welche Gefahren von den scharfen Atomwaffen ausgehen, ist uns kaum bewusst. Der Journalist und Bestseller-Autor Eric Schlosser deckt in diesem zeithistorischen Thriller auf der Grundlage von geheimen Unterlagen des Verteidigungsministeriums und Interviews mit Augenzeugen einen dramatischen Unfall in einem Atomwaffensilo der USA auf, der um ein Haar mehrere amerikanische Großstädte vernichtet hätte. In diesen Krimi einer am Ende gerade noch gelungenen Rettung flicht er die Geschichte der amerikanischen Atomrüstung ein. Er erzählt, wie Raketen und Sprengköpfe rund um die Uhr abschussbereit gehalten werden und wie die Menschen ticken, die ihr Leben für die Sicherheit der Massenvernichtungswaffen einsetzen. Eine spektakuläre Geschichte des Kalten Krieges und der Atomrüstung «von unten»: aus der Sicht der Soldaten in den Silos, die mit einem falschen Handgriff die Apokalypse auslösen können. «Atemberaubend, ... mitreißend ... Eric Schlosser verbindet profunde Informationen mit der Erzählung haarsträubender Details zu zahlreichen Unfällen und zeigt, dass auch die besten Kontrollsysteme nicht menschlichen Fehlern, Missgeschicken und der wachsenden technologischen Komplexität gewachsen sind.» Publisher’s Weekly »Ebenso anschaulich wie erschütternd ... Eine umfassende und beunruhigende Untersuchung über die Illusion der Sicherheit von Atomwaffen.” Kirkus Reviews «Die weltweiten Atwomwaffenarsenale sind nicht so sicher, wie sie sein sollten – das ist die Botschaft dieses faszinierenden und aufwühlenden Buches.» Lee H. Hamilton, ehemaliger Kongress-Abgeordneter der USA und Co-Vorsitzender der Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future

Genius in the Shadows

A Biography of Leo Szilard, the Man Behind the Bomb
Author: William Lanouette,Bela Silard
Publisher: Skyhorse
ISBN: 1628734779
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 641
View: 4818

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Well-known names such as Albert Einstein, Enrico Fermi, J. Robert Oppenheimer, and Edward Teller are usually those that surround the creation of the atom bomb. One name that is rarely mentioned is Leo Szilard, known in scientific circles as “father of the atom bomb.” The man who first developed the idea of harnessing energy from nuclear chain reactions, he is curiously buried with barely a trace in the history of this well-known and controversial topic. Born in Hungary and educated in Berlin, he escaped Hitler’s Germany in 1933 and that first year developed his concept of nuclear chain reactions. In order to prevent Nazi scientists from stealing his ideas, he kept his theories secret, until he and Albert Einstein pressed the US government to research atomic reactions and designed the first nuclear reactor. Though he started his career out lobbying for civilian control of atomic energy, he concluded it with founding, in 1962, the first political action committee for arms control, the Council for a Livable World. Besides his career in atomic energy, he also studied biology and sparked ideas that won others the Nobel Prize. The Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California, where Szilard spent his final days, was developed from his concepts to blend science and social issues.

Picturing the Bomb

Photographs from the Secret World of the Manhattan Project
Author: N.A
Publisher: Harry N Abrams Incorporated
ISBN: N.A
Category: Political Science
Page: 232
View: 8190

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The granddaughter of Enrico Fermi, a key participant in the Manhattan Project, presents a pictorial survey of the making of the atomic bomb, containing many never-before-published photographs and snapshots of the many aspects of the Project. Library of Science Alt.

Arsenals of Folly


Author: Richard Rhodes
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307267865
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 8243

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Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Rhodes delivers a riveting account of the nuclear arms race and the Cold War. In the Reagan-Gorbachev era, the United States and the Soviet Union came within minutes of nuclear war, until Gorbachev boldly launched a campaign to eliminate nuclear weapons, setting the stage for the 1986 Reykjavik summit and the incredible events that followed. In this thrilling, authoritative narrative, Richard Rhodes draws on personal interviews with both Soviet and U.S. participants and a wealth of new documentation to unravel the compelling, shocking story behind this monumental time in human history—its beginnings, its nearly chilling consequences, and its effects on global politics today.

Beyond Engineering

How Society Shapes Technology
Author: Robert Pool
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198026723
Category: Technology & Engineering
Page: 368
View: 1821

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We have long recognized technology as a driving force behind much historical and cultural change. The invention of the printing press initiated the Reformation. The development of the compass ushered in the Age of Exploration and the discovery of the New World. The cotton gin created the conditions that led to the Civil War. Now, in Beyond Engineering, science writer Robert Pool turns the question around to examine how society shapes technology. Drawing on such disparate fields as history, economics, risk analysis, management science, sociology, and psychology, Pool illuminates the complex, often fascinating interplay between machines and society, in a book that will revolutionize how we think about technology. We tend to think that reason guides technological development, that engineering expertise alone determines the final form an invention takes. But if you look closely enough at the history of any invention, says Pool, you will find that factors unrelated to engineering seem to have an almost equal impact. In his wide-ranging volume, he traces developments in nuclear energy, automobiles, light bulbs, commercial electricity, and personal computers, to reveal that the ultimate shape of a technology often has as much to do with outside and unforeseen forces. For instance, Pool explores the reasons why steam-powered cars lost out to internal combustion engines. He shows that the Stanley Steamer was in many ways superior to the Model T--it set a land speed record in 1906 of more than 127 miles per hour, it had no transmission (and no transmission headaches), and it was simpler (one Stanley engine had only twenty-two moving parts) and quieter than a gas engine--but the steamers were killed off by factors that had little or nothing to do with their engineering merits, including the Stanley twins' lack of business acumen and an outbreak of hoof-and-mouth disease. Pool illuminates other aspects of technology as well. He traces how seemingly minor decisions made early along the path of development can have profound consequences further down the road, and perhaps most important, he argues that with the increasing complexity of our technological advances--from nuclear reactors to genetic engineering--the number of things that can go wrong multiplies, making it increasingly difficult to engineer risk out of the equation. Citing such catastrophes as Bhopal, Three Mile Island, the Exxon Valdez, the Challenger, and Chernobyl, he argues that is it time to rethink our approach to technology. The days are gone when machines were solely a product of larger-than-life inventors and hard-working engineers. Increasingly, technology will be a joint effort, with its design shaped not only by engineers and executives but also psychologists, political scientists, management theorists, risk specialists, regulators and courts, and the general public. Whether discussing bovine growth hormone, molten-salt reactors, or baboon-to-human transplants, Beyond Engineering is an engaging look at modern technology and an illuminating account of how technology and the modern world shape each other.

Roosevelt and Stalin

Portrait of a Partnership
Author: Susan Butler
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 1101874627
Category: History
Page: 608
View: 6797

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A hugely important book that solely and fully explores for the first time the complex partnership during World War II between FDR and Stalin, by the editor of My Dear Mr. Stalin: The Complete Correspondence of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph V. Stalin (“History owes a debt to Susan Butler for the collection and annotation of these exchanges”—Arthur Schlesinger, Jr). Making use of previously classified materials from the Russian State Archive of Social and Political History, and the Archive of the Foreign Policy of the Russian Federation, as well as the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library and three hundred hot war messages between Roosevelt and Stalin, Butler tells the story of how the leader of the capitalist world and the leader of the Communist world became more than allies of convenience during World War II. Butler reassess in-depth how the two men became partners, how they shared the same outlook for the postwar world, and how they formed an uneasy but deep friendship, shaping the world’s political stage from the war to the decades leading up to and into the new century. Roosevelt and Stalin tells of the first face-to-face meetings of the two leaders over four days in December 1943 at Tehran, in which the Allies focused on the next phases of the war against the Axis Powers in Europe and Asia; of Stalin’s agreement to launch another major offensive on the Eastern Front; and of his agreement to declare war against Japan following the Allied victory over Germany. Butler writes of the weeklong meeting at Yalta in February of 1945, two months before Roosevelt’s death, where the unconditional surrender of Nazi Germany was agreed on and postwar Europe was reorganized, and where Stalin agreed to participate in Roosevelt’s vision of the United Nations. The book makes clear that Roosevelt worked hard to win Stalin over, pursuing the Russian leader, always holding out the promise that Roosevelt’s own ideas were the best bet for the future peace and security of Russia; however, Stalin was not at all sure that Roosevelt’s concept of a world organization, even with police powers, would be enough to keep Germany from starting a third world war, but we see how Stalin’s view of Roosevelt evolved, how he began to see FDR as the key to a peaceful world. Butler’s book is the first to show how FDR pushed Stalin to reinstate religion in the Soviet Union, which he did in 1943; how J. Edgar Hoover derailed the U.S.-planned establishment of an OSS intelligence mission in Moscow and a Soviet counterpart in America before the 1944 election; and that Roosevelt had wanted to involve Stalin in the testing of the atomic bomb at Alamogardo, New Mexico. We see how Roosevelt’s death deeply affected Stalin. Averell Harriman, American ambassador to the Soviet Union, reported that the Russian premier was “more disturbed than I had ever seen him,” and said to Harriman, “President Roosevelt has died but his cause must live on. We shall support President Truman with all our forces and all our will.” And the author explores how Churchill’s—and Truman’s—mutual mistrust and provocation of Stalin resulted in the Cold War. A fascinating, revelatory portrait of this crucial, world-changing partnership. From the Hardcover edition.

A Quest for Global Peace

Rotblat and Ikeda on War, Ethics and the Nuclear Threat
Author: Joseph Rotblat,Daisaku Ikeda
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 9781845112783
Category: Philosophy
Page: 157
View: 6841

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One of the "inventors" of the nuclear bomb, Sir Joseph Rotblat very soon turned away from weapons research to make a prolonged and principled stand against the dangers of nuclear proliferation. A physicist of great brilliance, he metamorphosed into a campaigner of admired moral conviction and leadership. This series of dialogues between two leading ethical thinkers brings together the courage and humanity of Rotblat with the spiritual wisdom and global visionary outlook of Daisaku Ikeda, the leader of the world's largest and most influential lay Buddhist organization. Together they reflect on fundamental issues of war and peace, the ethics of nuclear deterrence and the trajectory of Joseph Rotblat's career, from the Manhattan Project to the Pugwash Conference and his Nobel Prize. Rotblat's life-long mantra was that scientists have a moral responsibility to save lives, not destroy them. The integrity of both writers emerges powerfully and inspiringly from their wide-ranging discussions, which serve as a stark warning against the dangers of a resurgent atomic weapons race.

Thin Ice

Unlocking the Secrets of Climate in the World's Highest Mountains
Author: Mark Bowen
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 1429932708
Category: Science
Page: 480
View: 5389

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"One of the best books yet published on climate change . . . The best compact history of the science of global warming I have read."—Bill McKibben, The New York Review of Books The world's premier climatologist, Lonnie Thompson has been risking his career and life on the highest and most remote ice caps along the equator, in search of clues to the history of climate change. His most innovative work has taken place on these mountain glaciers, where he collects ice cores that provide detailed information about climate history, reaching back 750,000 years. To gather significant data Thompson has spent more time in the death zone—the environment above eighteen thousand feet—than any man who has ever lived. Scientist and expert climber Mark Bowen joined Thompson's crew on several expeditions; his exciting and brilliantly detailed narrative takes the reader deep inside retreating glaciers from China, across South America, and to Africa to unravel the mysteries of climate. Most important, we learn what Thompson's hard-won data reveals about global warming, the past, and the earth's probable future.

Deterrence

Rising Powers, Rogue Regimes, and Terrorism in the Twenty-First Century
Author: A. Lowther
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137289813
Category: Political Science
Page: 244
View: 6278

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This volume moves beyond Cold War deterrence theory to show the many ways in which deterrence is applicable to contemporary security: in space, in cyberspace, and against non-state actors. It also examines the role of nuclear deterrence in the twenty-first century and reaches surprising conclusions.