Dandies and Their Misogynistic Attitudes in Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray


Author: Jessica Menz
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3640245377
Category:
Page: 28
View: 2000

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Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,3, University of Bayreuth (Lehrstuhl fur Englische Literaturwissenschaft), course: 19th Century British Novels, 13 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray is a novel of the Victorian 'fin de siecle'. Its protagonists are dandies, who follow the principle of a so-called New Hedonism. Under the influence of the elder Lord Henry, Dorian Gray assumes his way of life, thinking and even his attitude to women. Actually the entire novel is shaped by a certain misogynistic culture that reveals itself in different forms. In this paper I am going to illustrate how the male characters, mainly the dandies Lord Henry and Dorian, use their voice to speak up against women, whereas the female ones remain voiceless most of the time. Apart from its fictional content, the novel is full with concepts that shaped Victorian society. To get a full understanding, I am therefore going to illustrate the novel's historical context and some of the phenomena of the Victorian '90s, for example, New Hedonism, Dandyism etc. I am then going to give a description of the dandies in the novel, Lord Henry Wotton and Dorian Gray, before illustrating their misogynistic attitudes. I will be looking for reasons as well as describing the different types of women that are in the novel, focusing on Sibyl, the most important female character in the novel."

"The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde. A Negative Bildungsroman?


Author: Silvia Schilling
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3668197016
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 5
View: 6576

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Essay from the year 2014 in the subject English - Literature, Works, University of Constance, course: Proseminar: The British Bildungsroman, language: English, abstract: This essay discusses Oscar Wilde's only novel "The Picture of Dorian Gray" as a bildungsroman. The essay gives a brief overview concerning the genre, defines the traditional bildungsroman and analyses how "The Picture of Dorian Gray" agrees with and differs from the traditional genre.

Female Gender Stereotypes in Oscar Wilde ́s "The Picture of Dorian Gray"


Author: Alexandra Langbein
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3640338596
Category:
Page: 24
View: 6827

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Seminar paper from the year 2007 in the subject English - Literature, Works, grade: 2, University of Bamberg (Lehrstuhl fur Englische Literaturwissenschaft), course: Oscar Wilde Hauptseminar, language: English, abstract: 1. The Fin de Siecle: A Battle between as well as within the Sexes In her book Sexual Anarchy Elaine Showalter claims that "the fin de siecle was not only a battle between but also within the sexes" . The words "feminism" and "homosexuality" first came into use because New Women and male aesthetes redefined the meanings of femininity and masculinity and there were fears that emancipated women would bear children outside of marriage, or worse, that they would not have children at all. Playwrights like Arthur Pinero and Bernard Shaw choose womens oppression as themes for their works as well as Thomas Hardy, George Meredith and George Moore who wrote about the precarious situation of women in their novels. The fin de siecle was also a period of sexual scandals (there were problems with brothels, child prostitution and the sexual epidemic of syphilis), which changed the level of public awareness about sexuality. The Victorians "sought political emancipation, with a faith in the liberal tenets of individual freedom, equality, and autonomy [and] Individualism," they were very rational and progressive in economical matters but they were terribly insecure in social ones. This cultural insecurity led to the longing for strict border controls around the definition of gender, race, class and nationality: People thought if men and women could be fixed in their separate spheres, there could be preserved a comforting sense of identity and permanence."

"The Picture of Dorian Gray" and the Aesthetic Movement in England at the Turn of the Century


Author: Natalia Spektor
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3640319567
Category:
Page: 36
View: 3182

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Seminar paper from the year 2007 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2, University of Cologne (Englisches Seminar), course: Proseminar B: London Past and Present: Literary and Cultural Heritage of a Metropolis, 16 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: There are some famous writers at the end of the 19th century who are often mentioned as "decadent." They have asserted the superiority of beauty and pleasure over all other considerations. Oscar Wilde's novel The Picture of Dorian Gray presents the aestheticism and the hedonist way of living. The novel anticipates developments and structures of society of that time. The importance of Dorian's experiences refutes the decadent theories which are described in the Yellow Book that enthralls the protagonist. The novel as a whole can be seen as a psychological study which analyzes the gradual debasement of Dorian's nature. At the end of the story he is responsible for every vice and crime including murder. The author shows that on the one hand pleasure and beauty are the highest goods, on the other hand he argues that they also bring death and crime. The task of this research paper is to analyze the mentioned contradiction and the influence of the Aesthetic movement on the novel as well as Oscar Wilde's view of art. I would like to begin with a brief survey of the social and intellectual background at the end of the 19th century, exploring the major art movements of that time and how far they affect Wilde's work. Afterwards his main principles of Aestheticism and their reflection in the novel are analyzed as well as Dorian's life under the influence of the hedonist model. Oscar Wilde's novel The Picture of Dorian Gray reveals the contradictions of Wilde's relationship with the decadent trends of that time. He adopts and proclaims their esthetical and literary views, but the flippant amoralism that he sometimes parades so defiantly is belied by the final catastr

Aestheticism in Oscar Wilde's "The Picture of Dorian Gray"


Author: Jannis Rudzki-Weise
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3640771494
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 18
View: 7559

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Seminar paper from the year 2010 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 2.0, University of Kassel, course: Anglo-American Literature, language: English, abstract: Oscar Wilde’s only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, can be considered a revolutionary piece of literature not only because it broke out of the traditional value and belief pattern of the Victorian society but also because it replaced the traditional pattern with new concepts coined by Wilde and his former tutors. Several themes such as homoeroticism, an aesthetic lifestyle or influence and corruption, were issues that many had been afraid to address in the time before Wilde. In this research paper, I will place my main focus on the matter of aestheticism, the causes that it has and the consequences that result from an aesthetic lifestyle. In order to analyze these aspects, it is inevitable to have a closer look at Oscar Wilde’s beliefs about art and morality which serve as a basis for understanding the main character’s behavior in the novel. To begin my paper, I will outline Wilde’s thoughts on art and aestheticism as presented in his famous selection, Intentions, which consists of a number of essays and dialogues on aesthetics as well as his preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray that has been regarded as Wilde’s personal praise of aestheticism. This background information is essential to understanding the main character’s motivations in the story, which can often be related to Wilde’s life as an artist. I will then make a detailed analysis of the characters Basil Hallward, Lord Henry Wotton, Sibyl Vane and Dorian Gray and will explain how their aesthetic behavior and their moral beliefs can be linked to Wilde’s thoughts. To end, I will attempt to summarize my findings referring to the statement that Wilde also included criticism of aestheticism in his novel. The term ‘aestheticism’ derives from Greek, meaning “perceiving through senses” and is a nineteenth-century European concept that rejects the moral rules and conventions of Victorian society, and focuses instead on beauty and the resulting pleasure in life. Since it is hard to nail down ‘aestheticism’ to one definition and since it has different meanings to different people, I will take a closer look at Oscar Wilde's thoughts about this concept, in order to better understand the correlation between this idea, and The Picture of Dorian Gray. When it was first published in Lippincott's Monthly Magazine on 20 June 1890, The Picture of Dorian Gray was attacked fiercely as it suggested a new set of moral beliefs.

Wilde and Petronius

The Satyricon as a Template for the Picture of Dorian Gray
Author: Morgan Crouch
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3640769902
Category:
Page: 32
View: 1590

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Scholarly Research Paper from the year 2010 in the subject English - Literature, Works, grade: A, -, language: English, comment: Western Washington University, abstract: It is no secret that the prominent aesthete Oscar Wilde was familiar with the work of Petronius of Rome. In fact, it's so far from a surreptitious topic that it remains undecided whether Wilde can be held responsible for a translation of Petronius's The Satyricon. His familiarity becomes quite apparent as well when we see Petronius's text specifically referenced within Wilde's work, The Picture of Dorian Gray. Wilde's texts were often thought to have subtle hints of homoeroticism while Petronius' The Satyricon demonstrated time and time again the blatant and unmistakably Roman depictions of homoeroticism. Furthermore, Wilde's texts were eventually condemned for their suggested homosexual connotations, while the homosexual events in The Satyricon were dismissed as standard. However, Wilde's reference of Petronius goes well beyond a mere scholarly allusion to demonstrate his well-read nature.

The lasting appeal of "The Picture of Dorian Gray". Character design, main themes and film adaptations


Author: Frank Hormesch
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3656872694
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 16
View: 2551

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Pre-University Paper from the year 2014 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,0, , language: English, abstract: It is the purpose of this paper to sum up the elements which contribute to the novel’s lasting appeal which also reflects itself in a variety of adaptations. This is intended to be done through an examination of the relations among the novel’s main characters and its main themes. The paper also shows a short comparison between the literary source and some selected film adaptations.

Friedrich Nietzsche’s and Oscar Wilde’s Critique of Sympathy


Author: Timo Dersch
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 365602684X
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 9
View: 5573

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Essay from the year 2011 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,9, University of Stuttgart, language: English, abstract: According to Aristotle sympathy is defined as a kind of pain induced by the suffering from another person. This suffering which the person has not deserved in this case could also happen to the person who is experiencing the sympathy in this situation. In the late nineteenth-century a new way of regarding sympathy came up. There were artists and scholars who did not support the thesis any more that sympathy is a part of humanity and functions as a base factor of our moral system. The following essay will introduce the reader to the two most famous proponents of the rejection of sympathy as a human necessity. One of them will represent the philosophical world, one of them the world of arts. As a conclusion there is the attempt of an explanation for the agreement of those two different proponents of the theory.

'The Picture of Dorian Gray' and Gothicism


Author: Marlissa Gerken
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3638831191
Category:
Page: 40
View: 512

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Seminar paper from the year 2005 in the subject English - Literature, Works, grade: 1,7, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Seminar fur Englische Philologie), course: Hauptseminar, 12 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Today, a Gothic novel is commonly defined as "a story of terror and suspense, usually set in a gloomy old castle or monastery" . This definition is based on the traditional Gothic novel, which was originated by Horace Walpole in 1764 . A number of elements came to be classed as Gothic and by the end of the century, the genre was fully established . However, when examining different Gothic works that have been published since the beginning of the Gothic tradition, one finds that the Gothic cannot be reduced to a scary story with a medieval setting. The Gothic is a genre that changes over time. The traditional elements usually persist, but new features are added to enrich the genre and to catch the spirit of the time. Kelly Hurley made the important observation that the "Gothic is rightly [...] understood as a cyclical genre that re-emerges in times of cultural stress in order to negotiate anxieties for its readership by working through them in displaced (sometimes supernaturalized) form." When a nation is exposed to either internal or external threats, which often cannot be clearly defined, the people begin to feel uncomfortable. The Gothic novel then, according to Hurley, can help these people in distress by giving concrete shapes to their fears. When the Gothic novel first came up at the end of the 18th century, people in Britain were coping with the impact of the French Revolution. The tradition flourished until the 1820s, when Charles Maturin's work Melmoth the Wanderer failed to reach a large readership . In the 1890s then, which is known as the time of the Gothic revival, new Gothic figures emerged with even greater force than at the previous fin de siecle . The Victorian public had undergone great changes, res"

Lord Arthur Goring - Oscar Wilde's Dandy


Author: Martin Lieb
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3638050408
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 21
View: 8678

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Seminar paper from the year 2001 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,5, University of Constance (Literaturwissenschaft), 10 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: The dandy has been one of the most fascinating and impressive phenomena of the 19th century. Even today, he seems to be an influence to some modern men. But what was the dandy, and how is he presented in literature, the place of his creation? Lord Arthur Goring, the dandy in Oscar Wilde ́s An Ideal Husband, is a narcissistic layabout with a colourful and complex personality, full of contradictions: He is at the same time cynical and mild, cold and compassionate, modern and aristocratic.

Oscar Wilde's "The Picture of Dorian Gray". An analysis with Christopher Booker's "Seven Basic Plots"


Author: N.A
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3668258775
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 14
View: 6426

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Essay from the year 2015 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,0, Ruhr-University of Bochum (Philologie), course: Academic skills, language: English, abstract: Christopher Booker argues in his book "The Seven Basic Plots – Why we tell stories" that “there is a number of plots which are fundamental to the way we tell stories” (Booker 6) and that every single storyline is constructed of one of the seven predetermined plot developments. Booker characterizes each of the possible plots roughly and then states that there cannot be any story that differs from one of these patterns. The author then goes even further. He states that every plot actually runs through the same five stages, which he calls “meta-plot” (Booker 157). In other words C. Booker demonstrates how to analyze the plot of a story by classifying it into the category it fits in and then subdividing its different stages. But does his concept really work for any story? Is it possible to categorize a book into one of Booker ́s seven plots and to subdivide its plot into the five stages of Booker ́s meta-plot afterwards? In order to question whether his theory works for different stories this work deals with the analysis of the novel "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde according to C. Booker ́s scheme of the Seven Basic Plots.

Decadence and Danger

Writing, History and the Fin de Siècle
Author: Tracey Hill
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Literature, Modern
Page: 220
View: 986

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Good, True, and Beautiful in "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde


Author: Dana Kabbani
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3638147886
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 42
View: 1318

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Seminar paper from the year 1998 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,0 (A), Grinnell College (English Studies), course: The Tradition of English Literatue, 31 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: 1. Introduction: In the following, the notions of “good, true, and beautiful” in Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray will be examined, both separately and as they relate to one another. These adjectives carry a positive meaning, and they create a distinct contrast to the critiques and accusations that have been raised against the book and its writer. The Picture of Dorian Gray is in many ways a “pivotal work” (Lawler 285) in Oscar Wilde’s life and career. It sums up his major influences of the 1870s and 1880s, and anticipates the style of his celebrated comedies to come. Why was the public’s opinion, which meant his ruin in the end, so important to Oscar Wilde? To answer this question it is necessary to look at Wilde’s audience and environment. Wilde was “the epitome of a new type of professional writer” (Small 3). Thus The Picture of Dorian Gray and the scandal it provoked have to be situated in the context of late Victorian social institutions of journalism, advertising, homosexual communities, criminology, etiquette, and theater (Gagnier, Cambridge Companion 27). Wilde had always been a great borrower and collector of literary culture, and therefore was often accused of plagiarism, but he transformed everything into his own way of expression. It is the blending of original invention and existing art that enables Wilde to create new effects and moods. This blending helps to explain how The Picture of Dorian Gray embraces the range from classic Greek and Latin masters to contemporary English, French, and German writers. From its first appearance in the spring of 1890, The Picture of Dorian Gray has suggested to readers parallels to other works, ancient or modern, in English or any other language. To specify the focus, the novel can be regarded as a study of various Victorian art movements corresponding to different stages in the development of Victorian human nature, and the main characters are meant to be personifications of these art movements and psychological states (Nassaar 37). This paper tries to shed light not only on Wilde’s paradoxical style, but also on the 1890s society by answering the following questions: Which are the major art movements at the end of the 19th century; how far do they affect Wilde’s work? To what extent is the book good, true, and beautiful? Or are the opposites more appropriate? [...]

Dandy in the Underworld

An Unauthorized Autobiography
Author: Sebastian Horsley
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0061461253
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 368
View: 3097

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In the honorable tradition of the eccentric dandyism of Lord Byron, Oscar Wilde, and Quentin Crisp comes Sebastian Horsley's disarming memoir of sex, drugs, and Savile Row.

The Picture of Dorian Gray. A Comparison of the two Versions


Author: Niels Schreiber
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3656884005
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 12
View: 7348

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Seminar paper from the year 2013 in the subject English - Literature, Works, grade: 2,0, University of Paderborn (Institut für Angelistik und Amerikanistik), course: A survey of British Queer Fiction, language: English, abstract: Since I was always interested in “famous” writers such as Shakespeare etc., I decided to write about Oscar Wilde ́s “The Picture of Dorian Gray”, for he is one of the best known writers and the title “The Picture of Dorian Gray” is nearly known by everyone. In this essay I will compare the two different versions of his novel, the censored version from 1891 and the uncensored version from 1890 in terms of the theme of homosexuality. I will try to show that there are big differences between these two versions and that they are significant enough to be even noticed by our generation which is fairly open about the topic of homosexuality. In order to do so I will first give a short account about homosexuality in England in the 19th century in the first chapter of the main part and then in the second and third chapter I will compare directly two chapters of the novel and show the changes that are made and analyse their effect on the mood of the scene and therefore on the novel. Lastly I will show that also the adding of a chapter changes a lot of the intention of the novel. After that I will, of course, draw a conclusion. To be able to draw my own conclusion I will only use a few sources about homosexuality in England for the first chapter of the main part such as Jeffrey Weeks “Sex, Politics & Society”, but for the comparison I will only use the Norton Critical Edition of “The Picture of Dorian Gray” and my own interpretations and analyses of the scenes. As I said my thesis is, that there are significant changes between the two versions, which may not change the intention of the book completely to the sophisticated reader, but which make the intentions a lot clearer and more obvious even to the unsophisticated reader.

A Glossary of Literary Terms


Author: M.H. Abrams,Geoffrey Harpham
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1285974514
Category: Education
Page: 448
View: 3961

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First published over fifty years ago, A GLOSSARY OF LITERARY TERMS remains an essential text for all serious students of literature. Now fully updated to reflect the latest scholarship on recent and rapidly evolving critical theories, the eleventh edition contains a complete glossary of essential literary terms presented as a series of engaging, beautifully crafted essays that explore the terms, place them in context, and suggest related entries and additional reading. This indispensable, authoritative, and highly affordable reference covers terms useful in discussing literature and literary history, theory, and criticism. Perfect as a core text for introductory literary theory or as a supplement to any literature course, this classic work is an invaluable reference that students can continue to use throughout their academic and professional careers. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

The Beauty Myth

How Images of Beauty Are Used Against Women
Author: Naomi Wolf
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 9780061969942
Category: Social Science
Page: 368
View: 4315

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The bestselling classic that redefined our view od the relationship between beauty and female identity. In today's world, women have more power, legal recognition, and professional success than ever before. Alongside the evident progress of the women's movement, however, writer and journalist Naomi Wolf is troubled by a different kind of social control, which, she argues, may prove just as restrictive as the traditional image of homemaker and wife. It's the beauty myth, an obsession with physical perfection that traps the modern woman in an endless spiral of hope, self-consciousness, and self-hatred as she tries to fulfill society's impossible definition of "the flawless beauty."

Social criticism in Oscar Wilde ́s Lady Windermere ́s Fan


Author: Simone Conen
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3638221830
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 21
View: 5697

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Seminar paper from the year 2000 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,5 (A), University of Trier (Literature Studies), course: Proseminar Oscar Wilde, 13 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Victorian England was puritan and it stressed self-discipline, patriotism, family, sexual morality, work and capitalism. There was a predominant inequality in the treatment of the genders; women were discriminated against in many fields of social life. Especially women of the upper and middle classes were not expected to be in employment but to marry and to rear the children. They had an extremely restricted choice of occupation as many professions refused entry to them, for example becoming doctors or bankers represented an impossibility. According to Professor George Peter Landow1, the range of female occupation facilities generally did not go beyond domestic servant, dressmaker and milliner, factory worker, governess or teacher, member of religious order, nurse, writer or prostitute. Usually, female labour consisted only of running the household and offering a pleasant family home to their husbands. Since they did not earn any money with the work as domestic servants who fulfil their duties as housewives and mothers, women were eager to get married and depended on their authoritarian husbands. Girls were brought up to ignore their sexual feelings and to obey their spouse as the head of the family. The whole education of young ladies focused on future marriage and the efforts of the season were to achieve this particular aim. Normally, the parents found the suitable partner for their child and they intervened in case of an undesirable liaison. In other terms, they made the decisions for their daughters. They thought mainly in commercial terms; the social status or the institution ́marriage ́ itself seemed far more important than the husband-to-be as a person. Society marriage could be seen as a mere mercenary affair: “People did not marry for love so much as for the conveniences of the families concerned; all marriages were in this sense “arranged”.” 2 [...] 1 George Peter Landow, Occupation and employment, Brown University, online, available:http://Landow.stg.brown.edu/Victorian/gender/political.html, 20 August 2000. 2 Christopher Lasch, Divorce and the Family in America, November 1966, online, available:http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/family/divorce.htm, 15 August 2000.