Crowds in the 21st Century

Perspectives from contemporary social science
Author: John Drury,Clifford Stott
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317980484
Category: Social Science
Page: 196
View: 5948

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Crowds in the 21st Century presents the latest theory and research on crowd events and crowd behaviour from across a range of social sciences, including psychology, sociology, law, and communication studies. Whether describing the language of the crowd in protest events, measuring the ability of the crowd to empower its participants, or analysing the role of professional organizations involved in crowd safety and public order, the contributions in this volume are united in their commitment to a social scientific level of analysis. The crowd is often depicted as a source of irrationality and danger – in the form of riots and mass emergencies. By placing crowd events back in their social context – their ongoing historical and proximal relationships with other groups and social structures – this volume restores meaning to the analysis of crowd behaviour. Together, the studies described in this collection demonstrate the potential of crowd research to enhance the positive experience of crowd participants and to improve design, planning, and management around crowd events. This book was originally published as a special issue of Contemporary Social Science.

Protest, Movements, and Dissent in the Social Sciences

A multidisciplinary perspective
Author: Giovanni A. Travaglino
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131740856X
Category: Social Science
Page: 144
View: 7958

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Drawing on a wide range of social science disciplines and approaches, each chapter in this book offers a comprehensive analysis of social protest, political dissent and collective action. The distinguished scholars contributing to the book discuss some of the key theoretical and methodological issues in social protest research, and analyse recent instances of collective dissent around the globe, ranging from the 15M movement in Spain, to the 2011 Salford riots in the UK, to Pro-Palestinian activism in Jerusalem. The result of these contributions is a sophisticated and multifaceted collection that enriches our understanding of why, when, and how groups of people decide to act collectively in order to pursue political change. The book is a timely testament to the vitality of the field. This book was originally published as a special issue of Contemporary Social Science.

Social Science Perspectives on Climate Change


Author: David Canter
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317408381
Category: Science
Page: 132
View: 3637

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Although it is generally accepted that the climate is changing for the worse and that human activities are a major contributing factor in that change, there is still only marginal response to the challenge posed by climate change. The reasons behind this limited response are becoming clearer through the recognition that climate change is not just a set of physical science facts, but it is also part of a series of complex social processes. Consequently, this book is important in providing social science perspectives on a range of attempts to adjust human activity to reduce its environmental impact. These attempts vary from the changing of the dress code in Japanese offices to the creation of zero-carbon, gated communities in Bangalore, India. Taken together, the contributions to this book provide timely insights into the complexities of saving the planet through human endeavour. This book was originally published as a special issue of Contemporary Social Science.

Contemporary Society

An Introduction to Social Science
Author: John A Perry,Erna K Perry
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317328965
Category: Social Science
Page: 508
View: 8595

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This best-selling text emphasizes why social and cultural changes are the pervasive realities of our time. A key theme of Contemporary Society is that the transition from an industrial to a post-industrial order in today’s world is fraught with difficulties, as was the transition from an agricultural to an industrial order in an earlier era. Within this framework, we can observe the increasing fragmentation of the social order today, which tends to lead people away from community and a common purpose, more often bringing conflict and disunity. Still, countervailing social forces are also at work, providing some stability--some shelter in a sea of change. Ever more, societies are faced with the rapid and transformative power of information technology, which helps propel separate groups of people into a global entity.This introduction to the social sciences shows what the authors have learned from such disciplines as anthropology, geography, history, sociology, psychology, political science, and economics--and how to apply social science approaches to an ever-faster tempo of change. The authors cover family life, interaction with others, racial and ethnic diversity, education, religion, population, environment, and many other topics analyzed in a student-friendly approach. New to this Edition The integration and flow of the text has been improved for better student comprehension. Expanded selection of Web Links to many more sites for student research, many relevant to their interests and entertainment choices Enriched focus on applying social science knowledge to current events (transcending a complete reliance on assumptions from the media) New/expanded coverage on topics throughout the book, including New findings from global warming research and its implications for social life and policy New developments in race relations in an integrated approach throughout many chapters Deepening inequality and the implications that threaten family, education, and student futures—nationally and globally Gender, including new developments in legal gay marriage and transgender Expanded coverage of genetics and the medical potential of human genome sequencing New developments in astrophysics and their potential implications for society Updated Statistics throughout

Social Science and Historical Perspectives

Society, Science, and Ways of Knowing
Author: Jack David Eller
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317198255
Category: Social Science
Page: 296
View: 6751

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This accessible book introduces the story of ‘social science’, with coverage of history, politics, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, and geography. Key questions include: How and why did the social sciences originate and differentiate? How are they related to older traditions that have defined Western civilization? What is the unique perspective or ‘way of knowing’ of each social science? What are the challenges—and alternatives—to the social sciences as they stand in the twenty-first century? Eller explains the origin, evolution, methods, and the main figures, literature, concepts, and theories in each discipline. The chapters also feature a range of contemporary examples, with consideration given to how the disciplines address present-day issues.

Meaning in Motion

New Cultural Studies of Dance
Author: Jane Desmond
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822319429
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 398
View: 5319

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Dance, whether considered as an art form or embodied social practice, as product or process, is a prime subject for cultural analysis. Yet only recently have studies of dance become concerned with the ideological, theoretical, and social meanings of dance practices, performances, and institutions. In Meaning in Motion, Jane C. Desmond brings together the work of critics who have ventured into the boundaries between dance and cultural studies, and thus maps a little known and rarely explored critical site. Writing from a broad range of perspectives, contributors from disciplines as varied as art history and anthropology, dance history and political science, philosophy and women's studies, chart the questions and challenges that mark this site. How does dance enact or rework social categories of identity? How do meanings change as dance styles cross borders of race, nationality, or class? How do we talk about materiality and motion, sensation and expressivity, kinesthetics and ideology? The authors engage these issues in a variety of contexts: from popular social dances to the experimentation of the avant-garde; from nineteenth-century ballet and contemporary Afro-Brazilian Carnival dance to hip hop, the dance hall, and film; from the nationalist politics of folk dances to the feminist philosophies of modern dance. Meaning in Motion broadens the scope of dance analysis and extends to cultural studies new ways of approaching matters of embodiment, identity, and representation. Giving definition to a new field of study, it will interest students and scholars of dance, art, and theatre history, as well as readers in cultural, performance, and women's studies. Contributors. Ann Cooper Albright, Evan Alderson, Norman Bryson, Ann Daly, Brenda Dixon Gottschild, Susan Foster, Mark Franko, Marianne Goldberg, Amy Koritz, Susan Kozel, Susan Manning, Randy Martin, Angela McRobbie, Cynthia Novack, Kate Ramsey, Anna Scott, Janet Wolff.

The Crowd in contemporary Britain


Author: George Gaskell,Robert Benewick
Publisher: Sage Publications Ltd
ISBN: N.A
Category: Psychology
Page: 273
View: 9119

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In the years of post-war prosperity in Britain, the crowd played little part in public life. However, in 1981 a new era was opened by the renewed outbreak of major crowd disorders starting in the London suburb of Brixton within five miles of the seat of British government. What is the explanation for this resurgence of the crowd? What will be its impact upon British society? These questions are the subject of this thoroughly researched, scientific study of the crowd. Although it focuses on events in Britain during the 1980s, its purpose is to understand the underlying nature of the crowd as a phenomenon.

International Encyclopedia of Social & Behavioral Sciences


Author: N.A
Publisher: Newnes
ISBN: 0080548059
Category: Social Science
Page: 17500
View: 2000

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This Encyclopedia is the first attempt in a generation to map the social and behavioral sciences on a grand scale. Not since the publication in 1968 of the International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, edited by David L. Sills, has there been such an ambitious project to describe the state of the art in all the fields encompassed within the social and behavioral sciences. Available in both print (26 volumes) and online editions, it comprises 4,000 articles, commissioned by 52 Section Editors, and includes 90,000 bibliographic references as well as comprehensive name and subject indexes.

Blinded by the Whites

Why Race Still Matters in 21st-Century America
Author: David H. Ikard
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253011035
Category: Social Science
Page: 192
View: 5911

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The election of Barack Obama gave political currency to the (white) idea that Americans now live in a post-racial society. But the persistence of racial profiling, economic inequality between blacks and whites, disproportionate numbers of black prisoners, and disparities in health and access to healthcare suggest there is more to the story. David H. Ikard addresses these issues in an effort to give voice to the challenges faced by most African Americans and to make legible the shifting discourse of white supremacist ideology—including post-racialism and colorblind politics—that frustrates black self-determination, agency, and empowerment in the 21st century. Ikard tackles these concerns from various perspectives, chief among them black feminism. He argues that all oppressions (of race, gender, class, sexual orientation) intersect and must be confronted to upset the status quo.

Essential Israel

Essays for the 21st Century
Author: S. Ilan Troen,Rachel Fish
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253027195
Category: History
Page: 436
View: 5450

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Most Americans are ill-prepared to engage thoughtfully in the increasingly serious debate about Israel, its place in the Middle East, and its relations with the United States. Essential Israel examines a wide variety of complex issues and current concerns in historical and contemporary contexts to provide readers with an intimate sense of the dynamic society and culture that is Israel today. The expert contributors to this volume address the Arab-Israeli conflict, the state of diplomatic efforts to bring about peace, Zionism and the impact of the Holocaust, the status of the Jewish state and Israeli democracy, foreign relations, immigration and Israeli identity, as well as literature, film, and the other arts. This unique and innovative volume provides solid grounding to understandings of Israel's history, politics, culture, and possibilities for the future.

Global Crisis

War, Climate Change and Catastrophe in the Seventeenth Century - Abridged Ed.
Author: Geoffrey Parker
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300226357
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 2719

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An accessible synthesis of the prescient best seller exploring seventeenth-century catastrophe and the impact of climate change First published in 2013, Geoffrey Parker’s prize-winning best seller Global Crisis analyzes the unprecedented calamities—revolutions, droughts, famines, invasions, wars, and regicides—that befell the mid-seventeenth-century world and wiped out as much as one-third of the global population, and reveals climate change to be the root cause. Examining firsthand accounts of the crises and scrutinizing the prevailing weather patterns during the 1640s and 1650s—longer and harsher winters, and cooler and wetter summers—Parker reveals evidence of disrupted growing seasons causing malnutrition, disease, a higher death toll, and fewer births. This new abridged edition distills the original book’s prodigious research for a broader audience while retaining and indeed emphasizing Parker’s extraordinary historical achievement: his dazzling demonstration of the link between climate change and worldwide catastrophe 350 years ago. Yet, the contemporary implications of his study are equally important: are we prepared today for the catastrophes that climate change could bring tomorrow? At half the original length, this user-friendly abridgment is ideal for students and general readers seeking a rapid handle on the key issues.

Social Science and Policy Challenges

Democracy, Values and Capacities
Author: Georgios Papanagnou
Publisher: UNESCO
ISBN: 9231042262
Category: Political Science
Page: 299
View: 3475

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Producing scientific knowledge that can inform solutions and guide policy-making is one of the most important functions of social science. Nonetheless, if social science is to become more relevant and influential so as to impact on the drawing and execution of policy, certain measures need to be taken to narrow its distance from the policy sphere. This decision is less obvious than it seems. Both research and experience have proved that policy-making is a complex, often sub-rational, interactive process that involves a wide range of actors such as decision makers, bureaucrats, researchers, organized interests, citizen and civil society representatives and research brokers. In addition, social science often needs to defend both its relevance to policy and its own scientific status. Moving away from instrumental visions of the link between social research and policy, this collective volume aims to highlight the more constructed nature of the use of social knowledge.

Globalization unmasked

imperialism in the 21st century
Author: James F. Petras,Henry Veltmeyer
Publisher: Fernwood
ISBN: 9781552660485
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 183
View: 2200

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Global Citizen – Challenges and Responsibility in an Interconnected World


Author: Aksel Sterri
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9462099294
Category: Education
Page: 114
View: 1734

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A globalized world places new demands on us as citizens. Global Citizen – Challenges and Responsibility in an Interconnected World gives insight and perspectives on what it means to be a citizen in a global world from Norway's most distinguished scholars. It poses and answers important questions, such as which duties and rights do we have as citizens in a globalized world; which institutions are just and sustainable, and how can a global ethic and a global worldview be reconciled with the fact that the lives of the greater part of the Earth’s population is still local? Global Citizen – Challenges and Responsibility in an Interconnected World draws on insights from philosophy, jurisprudence, theology, and the social sciences to shed light on this manifold and important topic, with relevance for policy makers, stakeholders, academics, but most important, for us as citizens who need to take both a political and personal decision on how to live as a citizen in a global world.

The Psychology and Politics of the Collective

Groups, Crowds, and Mass Identifications
Author: Ruth Parkin-Gounelas
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415510260
Category: Psychology
Page: 221
View: 6818

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Within the context of shifting social bonds in global culture, this book brings together debates on the left from political philosophy, psychoanalysis, social psychology and media and cultural studies to explore the logic of the formation of collective identities from a new theoretical perspective.

Histories of Suicide

International Perspectives on Self-Destruction in the Modern World
Author: John Weaver,David Wright
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442692049
Category: Medical
Page: 336
View: 3463

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Suicide is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, with more than one million fatalities each year. During the post-war period, the rate of completed suicides has risen dramatically, especially among young men and Aboriginal peoples living in the Western world. While this has naturally led to growing concern amongst health care practitioners and policy experts, relatively little is known about the history of attempted and completed suicide. Histories of Suicide is the first book to examine the history of suicide in diverse national contexts, including Japan, Scotland, Australia, Soviet Russia, Peru, United States, France, South Africa, and Canada, to reveal the different social, political, economic, and cultural factors that inform our understanding of suicide. This interdisciplinary collection of essays assembles historians, health economists, anthropologists, and sociologists, who examine the history of suicide from a variety of approaches to provide crucial insight into how suicide differs across nations, cultures, and time periods. Focusing on developments from the eighteenth century to the present, the contributors examine vitally important topics such as the medicalization of suicide, representations of mental illness, psychiatric disputes, and the frequency of suicide amongst soldiers. An illuminating volume of studies, Histories of Suicide is a fascinating examination of the phenomenon of self-destruction throughout different historical periods and nations.

Peasant Poverty and Persistence in the Twenty-First Century

Theories, Debates, Realities and Policies
Author: Julio Boltvinik,Susan Archer Mann
Publisher: Zed Books Ltd.
ISBN: 1783608463
Category: Social Science
Page: 488
View: 7077

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Peasants are a majority of the world’s poor. Despite this, there has been little effort to bridge the fields of peasant and poverty studies. Peasant Poverty and Persistence in the Twenty-first Century provides a much-needed critical perspective linking three central questions: Why has peasantry, unlike other areas of non-capitalist production, persisted? Why are the vast majority of peasants poor? And how are these two questions related? Interweaving contributions from various disciplines, the book provides a range of responses, offering new theoretical, historical and policy perspectives on this peasant 'world drama'. Scholars from both South and North argue that, in order to find the policy paths required to overcome peasants’ misery, we need a seismic transformation in social thought, to which they make important contributions. They are convinced that we must build upon the peasant economy’s advantages over agricultural capitalism in meeting the challenges of feeding the growing world population while sustaining the environment. Structured to encourage debate among authors and mutual learning, Peasant Poverty and Persistence takes the reader on an intellectual journey toward understanding the peasantry.