A Sociology of Crime


Author: Peter Eglin,Stephen Hester
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136805141
Category: Social Science
Page: 316
View: 7216

Continue Reading →

The authors take three particular sociological perspectives, and use them to offer a distinct and critical reading of criminology, highlighting the ways that crime is, first and foremost, a matter of social definition. They provide a good introductory text which will be of great value to students.

Criminal Sociology


Author: Enrico Ferri
Publisher: BiblioBazaar, LLC
ISBN: 9780559034763
Category: History
Page: 308
View: 7126

Continue Reading →

Data of criminal anthropology and statistics of the nineteenth century, together with practical reforms

Limited Responsibilities

Social Movements and Criminal Justice
Author: Tamar Pitch
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415086547
Category: Medical
Page: 233
View: 4912

Continue Reading →

Limited Responsibilities explores the interaction between the criminal justice system and the wider concerns of political and social institutions, including the welfare state, social work and forensic psychiatry. Using the key concept of `responsibility', Tamar Pitch critiques the classical theories of Anglo-American and Italian criminologies, examining the allocation of responsibilities to individuals and society. Looking at the shifting political relationship between criminal justice and the welfare system, Pitch considers the problems which arise in our understandings of responsibility, particularly in relation to the young and the mentally disabled. She also documents the centrality of responsiblity as an issue in women's struggles for legislation on sexual violence, as a paradigm of the politicisation of notions of crime, victimization and criminal responsibility. Limited Responsiblities will be of interest to lecturers, students and professionals in criminology, social policy and women's studies.

International Practices of Criminal Justice

Social and legal perspectives
Author: Mikkel Jarle Christensen,Ron Levi
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351384627
Category: Law
Page: 282
View: 7687

Continue Reading →

International Practices of Criminal Justice: Social and Legal Perspectives examines the practitioners, practices, and institutions that are transforming the relationship between criminal justice and international governance. The book links two dimensions of international criminal justice, by analyzing the fields of international criminal law and international police cooperation. Although often thought of separately, each of these fields presents criminal justice as a governance method for resolving international challenges and crises. By focusing on examples from international criminal tribunals, transitional justice, transnational crime, and transnational policing and prosecution, the contributors to this collection all examine how criminal justice is unmoored from the state, while also attending to the struggles and challenges that emerge when criminal justice is used as a form of international action. International Practices of Criminal Justice: Social and Legal Perspectives breaks new ground in criminology, international legal studies and the sociology of law, and will be of interest to students, scholars, and practitioners across a wide array of fields in criminal justice, international law, and international governance.

Crime

Critical Concepts in Sociology
Author: Philip Bean
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9780415252683
Category: Crime
Page: 422
View: 8793

Continue Reading →

Fundamentals of Criminal Justice

A Sociological View
Author: Steven E. Barkan,George J. Bryjak
Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Learning
ISBN: 0763754242
Category: Law
Page: 528
View: 2365

Continue Reading →

Ideal for allied health and pre-nursing students, Alcamos Fundamentals of Microbiology, Body Systems Edition, retains the engaging, student-friendly style and active learning approach for which award-winning author and educator Jeffrey Pommerville is known. It presents diseases, complete with new content on recent discoveries, in a manner that is directly applicable to students and organized by body system. A captivating art program, learning design format, and numerous case studies draw students into the text and make them eager to learn more about the fascinating world of microbiology.

The Oxford Handbook of Criminal Law


Author: Markus D Dubber,Tatjana Hörnle
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191654604
Category: Law
Page: 1100
View: 3425

Continue Reading →

The Oxford Handbook of Criminal Law reflects the continued transformation of criminal law into a global discipline, providing scholars with a comprehensive international resource, a common point of entry into cutting edge contemporary research and a snapshot of the state and scope of the field. To this end, the Handbook takes a broad approach to its subject matter, disciplinarily, geographically, and systematically. Its contributors include current and future research leaders representing a variety of legal systems, methodologies, areas of expertise, and research agendas. The Handbook is divided into four parts: Approaches & Methods (I), Systems & Methods (II), Aspects & Issues (III), and Contexts & Comparisons (IV). Part I includes essays exploring various methodological approaches to criminal law (such as criminology, feminist studies, and history). Part II provides an overview of systems or models of criminal law, laying the foundation for further inquiry into specific conceptions of criminal law as well as for comparative analysis (such as Islamic, Marxist, and military law). Part III covers the three aspects of the penal process: the definition of norms and principles of liability (substantive criminal law), along with a less detailed treatment of the imposition of norms (criminal procedure) and the infliction of sanctions (prison or corrections law). Contributors consider the basic topics traditionally addressed in scholarship on the general and special parts of the substantive criminal law (such as jurisdiction, mens rea, justifications, and excuses). Part IV places criminal law in context, both domestically and transnationally, by exploring the contrasts between criminal law and other species of law and state power and by investigating criminal law's place in the projects of comparative law, transnational, and international law.

Sociology of Crime, Law and Deviance


Author: Jeffery T. Ulmer
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 0762306807
Category: Science
Page: 345
View: 6153

Continue Reading →

Annotation. Volume 2 of the Sociology of Crime, Law and Deviance series demonstrates methodological diversity by presenting quantitative studies, ethnographies and discourse analyses. Through an application of these methodologies, the authors examine sanctions, crime and fear, legal and social control organizations and processes, and theory development.

Criminal Sociology. Authorized Edition


Author: Enrico Ferri
Publisher: Trieste Publishing
ISBN: 9780649557745
Category: History
Page: 314
View: 6592

Continue Reading →

Trieste Publishing has a massive catalogue of classic book titles. Our aim is to provide readers with the highest quality reproductions of fiction and non-fiction literature that has stood the test of time. The many thousands of books in our collection have been sourced from libraries and private collections around the world.The titles that Trieste Publishing has chosen to be part of the collection have been scanned to simulate the original. Our readers see the books the same way that their first readers did decades or a hundred or more years ago. Books from that period are often spoiled by imperfections that did not exist in the original. Imperfections could be in the form of blurred text, photographs, or missing pages. It is highly unlikely that this would occur with one of our books. Our extensive quality control ensures that the readers of Trieste Publishing's books will be delighted with their purchase. Our staff has thoroughly reviewed every page of all the books in the collection, repairing, or if necessary, rejecting titles that are not of the highest quality. This process ensures that the reader of one of Trieste Publishing's titles receives a volume that faithfully reproduces the original, and to the maximum degree possible, gives them the experience of owning the original work.We pride ourselves on not only creating a pathway to an extensive reservoir of books of the finest quality, but also providing value to every one of our readers. Generally, Trieste books are purchased singly - on demand, however they may also be purchased in bulk. Readers interested in bulk purchases are invited to contact us directly to enquire about our tailored bulk rates.

Crime and the Punished


Author: Douglas Hartmann,Christopher Uggen
Publisher: W. W. Norton
ISBN: 9780393920383
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 6559

Continue Reading →

An essential introduction to how sociologists think about and research crime and punishment.

Crime and Risk


Author: Pat O'Malley
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 0857026984
Category: Social Science
Page: 120
View: 1068

Continue Reading →

Over recent years, the governance of crime - from policing and crime prevention to sentencing and prison organization - has moved away from a focus on reforming offenders toward preventing crime and managing behaviour using predictive and distributional (such as risk) techniques. Crime and Risk presents an engaging discussion of risk strategies and risk-taking in the domain of crime and criminal justice. It outlines the broad theoretical issues and political approaches involved, relating risk in contemporary crime governance to risk in criminal activity. Taking a broad and discursive approach, it covers: Risk-taking and contemporary culture The excitement associated with risk-taking and the impact of criminal activity The application of risk-oriented developments in crime prevention and control The use of genetic and related biotechnologies to assess and react to perceived threats The conceptualization of risk in relation to race and gender The influence of excitement upon criminal activity Evidence and accountability. ? Compact Criminology is an exciting series that invigorates and challenges the international field of criminology. Books in the series are short, authoritative, innovative assessments of emerging issues in criminology and criminal justice – offering critical, accessible introductions to important topics. They take a global rather than a narrowly national approach. Eminently readable and first-rate in quality, each book is written by a leading specialist. Compact Criminology provides a new type of tool for teaching, learning and research, one that is flexible and light on its feet. The series addresses fundamental needs in the growing and increasingly differentiated field of criminology.

Punished

Policing the Lives of Black and Latino Boys
Author: Victor M. Rios
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 081477637X
Category: Social Science
Page: 218
View: 6536

Continue Reading →

The author discusses his background as a former gang member and juvenile delinquent in Oakland, California, during the 1980s and 1990s, details his efforts to study the lives of young men from his neighborhood after earning a PhD in sociology at Berkeley, and emphasizes the importance of understanding in order to develop solutions for young men who live in a culture of punishment.

Understanding Criminal Justice

Sociological Perspectives
Author: Philip Daniel Smith,Kristin Natalier
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9780761940326
Category: Social Science
Page: 225
View: 2169

Continue Reading →

Providing an overview of the sociological approaches to law and criminal justice, this book focuses on how law and the criminal justice system inevitably affect one another, and the ways in which both are intimately connected with wider social forces.

Making Hate A Crime

From Social Movement to Law Enforcement
Author: Valerie Jenness,Ryken Grattet
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
ISBN: 1610443144
Category: Social Science
Page: 236
View: 3920

Continue Reading →

Violence motivated by racism, anti-Semitism, misogyny, and homophobia weaves a tragic pattern throughout American history. Fueled by recent high-profile cases, hate crimes have achieved an unprecedented visibility. Only in the past twenty years, however, has this kind of violence—itself as old as humankind—been specifically categorized and labeled as hate crime. Making Hate a Crime is the first book to trace the emergence and development of hate crime as a concept, illustrating how it has become institutionalized as a social fact and analyzing its policy implications. In Making Hate a Crime Valerie Jenness and Ryken Grattet show how the concept of hate crime emerged and evolved over time, as it traversed the arenas of American politics, legislatures, courts, and law enforcement. In the process, violence against people of color, immigrants, Jews, gays and lesbians, women, and persons with disabilities has come to be understood as hate crime, while violence against other vulnerable victims-octogenarians, union members, the elderly, and police officers, for example-has not. The authors reveal the crucial role social movements played in the early formulation of hate crime policy, as well as the way state and federal politicians defined the content of hate crime statutes, how judges determined the constitutional validity of those statutes, and how law enforcement has begun to distinguish between hate crime and other crime. Hate crime took on different meanings as it moved from social movement concept to law enforcement practice. As a result, it not only acquired a deeper jurisprudential foundation but its scope of application has been restricted in some ways and broadened in others. Making Hate a Crime reveals how our current understanding of hate crime is a mix of political and legal interpretations at work in the American policymaking process. Jenness and Grattet provide an insightful examination of the birth of a new category in criminal justice: hate crime. Their findings have implications for emerging social problems such as school violence, television-induced violence, elder-abuse, as well as older ones like drunk driving, stalking, and sexual harassment. Making Hate a Crime presents a fresh perspective on how social problems and the policies devised in response develop over time. A Volume in the American Sociological Association's Rose Series in Sociology

Marked

Race, Crime, and Finding Work in an Era of Mass Incarceration
Author: Devah Pager
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226644855
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 2203

Continue Reading →

Nearly every job application asks it: have you ever been convicted of a crime? For the hundreds of thousands of young men leaving American prisons each year, their answer to that question may determine whether they can find work and begin rebuilding their lives. The product of an innovative field experiment, Marked gives us our first real glimpse into the tremendous difficulties facing ex-offenders in the job market. Devah Pager matched up pairs of young men, randomly assigned them criminal records, then sent them on hundreds of real job searches throughout the city of Milwaukee. Her applicants were attractive, articulate, and capable—yet ex-offenders received less than half the callbacks of the equally qualified applicants without criminal backgrounds. Young black men, meanwhile, paid a particularly high price: those with clean records fared no better in their job searches than white men just out of prison. Such shocking barriers to legitimate work, Pager contends, are an important reason that many ex-prisoners soon find themselves back in the realm of poverty, underground employment, and crime that led them to prison in the first place. “Using scholarly research, field research in Milwaukee, and graphics, [Pager] shows that ex-offenders, white or black, stand a very poor chance of getting a legitimate job. . . . Both informative and convincing.”—Library Journal “Marked is that rare book: a penetrating text that rings with moral concern couched in vivid prose—and one of the most useful sociological studies in years.”—Michael Eric Dyson

Comic Book Crime

Truth, Justice, and the American Way
Author: Nickie D. Phillips,Staci Strobl
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814767877
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 2398

Continue Reading →

“Carrying ahead the project of cultural criminology, Phillips and Strobl dare to take seriously that which amuses and entertains us—and to find in it the most significant of themes. Audiences, images, ideologies of justice and injustice—all populate the pages of Comic Book Crime. The result is an analysis as colorful as a good comic, and as sharp as the point on a superhero’s sword.”—Jeff Ferrell, author of Empire of Scrounge Superman, Batman, Daredevil, and Wonder Woman are iconic cultural figures that embody values of order, fairness, justice, and retribution. Comic Book Crime digs deep into these and other celebrated characters, providing a comprehensive understanding of crime and justice in contemporary American comic books. This is a world where justice is delivered, where heroes save ordinary citizens from certain doom, where evil is easily identified and thwarted by powers far greater than mere mortals could possess. Nickie Phillips and Staci Strobl explore these representations and show that comic books, as a historically important American cultural medium, participate in both reflecting and shaping an American ideological identity that is often focused on ideas of the apocalypse, utopia, retribution, and nationalism. Through an analysis of approximately 200 comic books sold from 2002 to 2010, as well as several years of immersion in comic book fan culture, Phillips and Strobl reveal the kinds of themes and plots popular comics feature in a post-9/11 context. They discuss heroes’ calculations of “deathworthiness,” or who should be killed in meting out justice, and how these judgments have as much to do with the hero’s character as they do with the actions of the villains. This fascinating volume also analyzes how class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation are used to construct difference for both the heroes and the villains in ways that are both conservative and progressive. Engaging, sharp, and insightful, Comic Book Crime is a fresh take on the very meaning of truth, justice, and the American way. Nickie D. Phillips is Associate Professor in the Sociology and Criminal Justice Department at St. Francis College in Brooklyn, NY. Staci Strobl is Associate Professor in the Department of Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. In the Alternative Criminology series

Punishment and Incarceration

A Global Perspective
Author: Mathieu Deflem
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 1783509074
Category: Social Science
Page: 310
View: 2861

Continue Reading →

This volume in the series Sociology of Crime, Law, and Deviance deals with aspects of punishment, including sentencing, incarceration, and prison conditions, in a variety of settings at local, national, and/or regional levels.

#Crime

Social Media, Crime, and the Criminal Legal System
Author: Rebecca M. Hayes,Kate Luther
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 9783319894430
Category: Law
Page: 203
View: 3239

Continue Reading →

As research continues to accumulate on the connections between media and crime, #Crime explores the impact of social media on the criminal legal system. It examines how media influences our perceptions of crime, the perpetration of crime, and the implementation of punishment, whilst emphasizing the significance of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality. It offers an accessible and in-depth examination of media and in each chapter there are case studies and examples from both legacy and new media, including discussions from Twitter that are being used to raise awareness of criminal legal issues. It also includes interviews with international scholars and practitioners from Australia, Belgium, and the United States to voice a range of global perspectives. This book speaks broadly to those interested in criminology, criminal justice, media and culture, sociology, and gender studies.

Narrative Criminology

Understanding Stories of Crime
Author: Lois Presser,Sveinung Sandberg
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479823414
Category: Social Science
Page: 336
View: 6665

Continue Reading →

Stories are much more than a means of communication—stories help us shape our identities, make sense of the world, and mobilize others to action. In Narrative Criminology, prominent scholars from across the academy and around the world examine stories that animate offending. From an examination of how criminals understand certain types of crime to be less moral than others, to how violent offenders and drug users each come to understand or resist their identity as ‘criminals’, to how cultural narratives motivate genocidal action, the case studies in this book cover a wide array of crimes and justice systems throughout the world. The contributors uncover the narratives at the center of their essays through qualitative interviews, ethnographic fieldwork, and written archives, and they scrutinize narrative structure and meaning by analyzing genres, plots, metaphors, and other components of storytelling. In doing so, they reveal the cognitive, ideological, and institutional mechanisms by which narratives promote harmful action. Finally, they consider how offenders’ narratives are linked to and emerge from those of conventional society or specific subcultures. Each chapter reveals important insights and elements for the development of a framework of narrative criminology as an important approach for understanding crime and criminal justice. An unprecedented and landmark collection, Narrative Criminology opens the door for an exciting new field of study on the role of stories in motivating and legitimizing harm.