CQ Almanac Plus 2003

108th Congress 1st
Author: CQ Press Staff
Publisher: Congress at Your Fingertips
ISBN: 9781568026398
Category: Political Science
Page: 1000
View: 9352

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New and Improved with original articles and reports - CQ Almanac Plus is a one-of-a kind source for an in-depth look and explanation of the first session of the 108th Congress. CQ Almanac Plus provides a detailed look at each major bill considered in 2002 - whether or not it became law. Plus, useful data-filled appendixes include: Key Votes, Vote Studies, Roll Call Votes, Public Laws, A look at Congress and Its Members, Texts, Election Results.

CQ Almanac 2008

110th Congress 2nd Session
Author: Jan Austin
Publisher: Congress at Your Fingertips
ISBN: 9780982353707
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 7199

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CQ Almanac


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781568026404
Category: United States
Page: 700
View: 5579

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CQ Almanac Plus gives you an in-depth look at the major bills of the second session of the 108th Congress, including the landmark overhaul of the nation's intelligence community and the failed attempt to update the nation's main highway law. The book also details the year's two big tax bills - for businesses and for middle-class families, along with the 13 appropriations bills, of which were enacted by the end of the session for the first time in three years. This year's edition also has a special section on the 2001 elections, with summaries of the presidential and congressional races and complete, official returns for every congressional district in the country. Each of the more than 80 legistative histories contains a detailed adescription of the bill, a behind-the-scene look at how it was shaped and its status at the end of 2004. CQ Almanac Plus also gives you the following: Key Votes Vote Studies All roll-call votes Public Laws

Red and Blue Nation?

Consequences and Correction of America's Polarized Politics
Author: Pietro S. Nivola,David W. Brady
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 9780815760788
Category: Political Science
Page: 320
View: 681

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America's polarized politics are largely disconnected from mainstream public preferences. This disconnect poses fundamental dangers for the representativeness and accountability of government, as well as the already withering public trust in it. As the 2008 presidential race kicks into gear, the political climate certainly will not become less polarized. With important issues to address—including immigration policy, health care, and the funding of the Iraq war—it is critical that essential policies not be hostage to partisan political battles. Building upon the findings of the first volume of Red and Blue Nation? (Brookings, 2006), which explored the extent of political polarization and its potential causes, this new volume delves into the consequences of the gulf between "red states" and "blue states." The authors examine the impact of these political divisions on voter behavior, Congressional law-making, judicial selection, and foreign policy formation. They shed light on hotly debated institutional reform proposals—including changes to the electoral system and the congressional rules of engagement—and ultimately present research-supported policies and reforms for alleviating the underlying causes of political polarization. While most discussion of polarization takes place in separate spheres of journalism and academia, Red and Blue Nation? brings together a unique set of voices with a wide variety of perspectives to enrich our understanding of the issue. Written in a broad, accessible style, it is a resource for anyone interested in the future of electoral politics in America. Contributors include Marc Hetherington and John G. Geer (Vanderbilt University), Deborah Jordan Brooks (Dartmouth College), Martin P. Wattenberg (University of California, Irvine), Barbara Sinclair and Joel D. Aberbach (UCLA), Christopher H. Foreman (University of Maryland), Keith Krehbiel (Stanford University), Sarah A. Binder, Benjamin Wittes, Jonathan Rauch, and William A. Galston (Brookings), Martin Shapiro (University of California–Berkeley), Peter Beinart (Council on Foreign Relations), James Q. Wilson (Pepperdine University), John Ferejohn and Larry Diamond (Hoover Institution), Laurel Harbridge (Stanford University), Andrea L. Campbell (MIT), and Eric M. Patashnik (University of Virginia).

CQ Almanac 2013


Author: C. Q. Roll Call
Publisher: Cq Press
ISBN: 9781483358475
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 3829

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CQ Almanac is the essential resource that chronicles and analyzes the major bills brought before Congress in the previous year. Published each summer, this non-partisan reference work offers exclusive insight into the forces that drove action on legislation. The CQ Almanac Includes: An unbiased look at the issues that mattered most in 2014 Offers original narrative accounts of every major piece of legislation that lawmakers considered during a congressional session Arranged thematically, CQ Almanac organizes, distills, and cross-indexes for permanent reference the full year in Congress and in national politics Print Version includes: Legislative Profiles, Key Votes, Vote Studies, Roll Call Votes, and Public Laws Available In Print and Online.

Congressional Deskbook: The Practical and Comprehensive Guide to Congress, Sixth Edition


Author: Judy Schneider,Michael L. Koempel
Publisher: The Capitol Net Inc
ISBN: 1587332396
Category: Political Science
Page: 593
View: 6783

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This comprehensive guide to Congress is ideal for anyone who wants to know how Congress really works, including federal executives, attorneys, lobbyists, media and public affairs staff, government affairs, policy and budget analysts, congressional office staff and students. - Clear explanation of the legislative process, budget process, and House and Senate business - Flowcharts for legislative and budget processes - Explanation of the electoral college and votes by states - Glossary of legislative terms - Relationship between budget resolutions and appropriation and authorization bills - Amendment tree and amendment procedures - How members are assigned to committees - Agenda for early organization meetings (after election, before adjournment) - Sample legislative documents with explanatory annotations - Bibliographic references throughout.

Unorthodox Lawmaking

New Legislative Processes in the U.S. Congress
Author: Barbara Sinclair
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 1506322859
Category: Political Science
Page: 320
View: 9474

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Most major measures wind their way through the contemporary Congress in what Barbara Sinclair has dubbed “unorthodox lawmaking.” In this much-anticipated Fifth Edition of Unorthodox Lawmaking, Sinclair explores the full range of special procedures and processes that make up Congress’s work, as well as the reasons these unconventional routes evolved. The author introduces students to the intricacies of Congress and provides the tools to assess the relative successes and limitations of the institution. This dramatically updated revision incorporates a wealth of new cases and examples to illustrate the changes occurring in congressional process. Two entirely new case study chapters—on the 2013 government shutdown and the 2015 reauthorization of the Patriot Act—highlight Sinclair’s fresh analysis and the book is now introduced by a new foreword from noted scholar and teacher, Bruce I. Oppenheimer, reflecting on this book and Barbara Sinclair’s significant mark on the study of Congress.

The Diversity Paradox

Political Parties, Legislatures, and the Organizational Foundations of Representation in America
Author: Kristin Kanthak,George A. Krause
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199891737
Category: Political Science
Page: 256
View: 1950

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In legislatures, group dynamics affect how the legislature operates, who is valued enough to play a critical decision-making role, and what voices matter in determining policy outcomes. An increase in a minority group's size within democratically-elected legislatures actually leads to the devaluation of individual minority group members. The authors assert that representative institutions such as legislatures face a 'diversity paradox': when the size of a minority group increases beyond mere 'tokenism' in representative institutions, it tends to create an unintended backlash toward the minority group's members that emanates from both majority and fellow minority group members. The inclusion of minority group voices in representative institutions is critical in a wide range of political decisions, ranging from legislative gender quotas in the new Iraqi constitution to attempts in the U.S. to increase minority representation through redistricting.

Party Polarization in Congress


Author: Sean M. Theriault
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139473002
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 4088

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The political parties in Congress are as polarized as they have been in 100 years. This book examines more than 30 years of congressional history to understand how it is that the Democrats and Republicans on Capitol Hill have become so divided. It finds that two steps were critical for this development. First, the respective parties' constituencies became more politically and ideologically aligned. Second, members ceded more power to their party leaders, who implemented procedures more frequently and with greater consequence. In fact, almost the entire rise in party polarization can be accounted for in the increasing frequency of and polarization on procedures used during the legislative process.

Downsizing the Federal Government


Author: Chris R. Edwards
Publisher: Cato Institute
ISBN: 9781930865822
Category: Political Science
Page: 250
View: 1596

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The federal government is running large budget deficits, spending too much, and heading toward a financial crisis. Federal spending has soared under President George W. Bush, and the costs of programs for the elderly are set to balloon in coming years.

Governing in a Polarized Age

Elections, Parties, and Political Representation in America
Author: Alan S. Gerber,Eric Schickler
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107095093
Category: Political Science
Page: 346
View: 6646

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This volume provides an in-depth examination of representation and legislative performance in contemporary American politics.

200 Notable Days

Senate Stories, 1787 to 2002
Author: N.A
Publisher: Government Printing Office
ISBN: 9780160763311
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 994

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Comprised of 200 readable and informative historic vignettes reflecting all areas of Senate activities, from the well known and notorious to the unusual and whimsical. Prepared by Richard A. Baker, the Senates Historian, these brief sketches, each with an accompanying illustration and references for further reading, provide striking insights into the colorful and momentous history of The World's Greatest Deliberative Body. Review from Goodreads: "Jason" rated this book with 3 stars and had this to say "This coffee table book on Senate History comes from none other than the U.S. Senate Historian, Richard Baker. The House of Representatives recently acquired noted historian of the Jacksonian era, Robert Remini as the official House Historian. He recently wrote a pretty impressive tomb on the House of Representatives. The Senate already has a 4 volume history written by US Senator, Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia, so the Senate could not reply in that manner. So, I think the coffee table book was the best that we could muster. I think this is the first time I have actually read a coffee table book from cover to cover. It is a chatty little story book filled with useful cocktail-party-history of the US Senate. That's useful knowledge to me, as I never know what to say at Washington cocktail parties. Perhaps anecdotes about Thomas Hart Benton will help break the ice. The most striking thing to me about the book was the number of attacks on the Capitol. I had heard about all the incidents individually, but it is more jolting to see them sequentially. 3 bombings, 2 gun attacks and then the attempt on September 11th. In a way, its remarkable that the Capitol complex remained so open for so long. Note, I use the past tense here. As any of you who have visited the capitol recently will have noted, it is increasingly difficult to get in. And once the Capitol Visitor Center is completed, I expect it will be very much a controlled experience like the White House. In any case, Baker's prose is breezy and he is dutifully reverent to the institution without missing the absurdities of Senate life. You also get a sense of the breakdown in lawfulness that preceded the Civil War. Its not just the canning of Charles Sumner, its also the Mississippi Senator pulling a gun on Missouri Senator Thomas Hart Benton in the Senate chamber. Then there is the case of California Senator David Broderick (an anti-slavery Democrat) being killed in a duel by the pro-slavery Chief Justice of the California Supreme Court. Apparently, back in those days, California was a lot more like modern Texas. In any case, the slide toward anarchy can definitely be found long before Fort Sumter. Another interesting aside that I really never knew concerns the order of succession. All of us learn in school that it is the President, then the Vice President, then the Speaker of the House and then President Pro Tempore of the Senate. After that, you get the members of the Cabinet, and I was aware that as new departments were created, they have been shuffled up a bit. What I did not know, is that Congress was not always in the order of succession at all. For a long time, it devolved from the President to the VP and then directly to the Secretary of State. Furthermore, when they first inserted Congress, it was the President Pro Tempore of the Senate who was third in line over the Speaker of the House. The structure we all know and love was only finalized in 1947 after some hard thinking in light of FDR's demise and the Constitutional Amendments on succession that followed. Anyway, this is a book for government geeks. If you are one, its a nice read and about as pleasant a way to introduce yourself to Senate history as I have found. If not, there are prettier coffee table books to be had."

American Reference Books Annual


Author: Bohdan S. Wynar
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Reference books
Page: N.A
View: 2392

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1970- issued in 2 vols.: v. 1, General reference, social sciences, history, economics, business; v. 2, Fine arts, humanities, science and engineering.

Congressional Staff Directory


Author: Anna L. Brownson,CQ Press,Charles Bruce Brownson,Inc. Congessional Quarterly
Publisher: Cq Staff Directories
ISBN: 9780872892125
Category: Political Science
Page: 1521
View: 9732

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Setting the standard for excellence in congressional information for more than 40 years. Now Bernan's The Almanac of the Unelected online.

Congressional Staff Directory, Fall 2004

108th Congress, Second Session
Author: Inc. Congessional Quarterly
Publisher: Cq Staff Directories
ISBN: 9780872892132
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 5709

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Setting the standard for excellence in congressional information for more than 40 years. Now Bernan's The Almanac of the Unelected online.

Presidential Performance

A Comprehensive Review
Author: Max J. Skidmore
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 9780786481767
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 421
View: 3973

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Presidential rankings emerged in 1948 when Life Magazine published an article by the prominent historian, Arthur M. Schlesinger, Sr., who had selected 55 experts on the presidency and asked them to rank the presidents. He asked his respondents to rank presidents into categories of "Great," "Near Great," "Average," "Below Average" and "Failure." The result was a substantial article that attracted wide public attention. His work and similar studies have not escaped criticism, however. Many general works on the presidency have discussed presidential greatness and identified presidents who stood out for good or ill. There are likely unavoidable inadequacies in all ranking schemes, regardless of the complicated measures that many authors employ in their attempts to be "scientific." This book provides useful criticism of these presidential rankings. It is arranged chronologically, and discusses each presidential performance and each ranking study in detail. Perhaps it would be sufficient to say that most who held the office were right for their time.