Congressional Odyssey

The Saga Of A Senate Bill
Author: T. R. Reid
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 1466834846
Category: Political Science
Page: 140
View: 8298

Continue Reading →

Washington Post reporter T.R. Reid takes a candid look at Washington personalities and politics, revealing the motives and strategies, the cooperation and rivalry, the honesty and the deceit behind a seemingly minor piece of legislation. He traces the course of S.790--the Inland Waterways Bill--from its inception to its eventual passage, a process with as many twists and subplots as a novel, and with characters just as vivid. In Congressional Odyssey: The Saga of a Senate Bill you will discover: - a cast of main characters including Jimmy Carter, Edward Kennedy, Walter Mondale, Hamilton Jordan, Howard Baker, Tip O'Neill, Russel Long, and other key political figures - a covert alliance between the railroad lobby and environmentalists, masked by a money-laundering scheme - the White House in-fighting triggered by the bill, leading to the ouster of Brock Adams during President Carter's cabinet shakeup - Carter's problems with the Congressional leadership, exacerbated by his support of the Inland Waterways Bill authored by Republican Senator Pete Domenici - "know-who" lawyers, who get things done through their connections rather than their legal abilities - the Alton, Illinois, Lock and Dam 26 project that earned Senator Proxmire's first "Golden Fleece Award" for wasting tax dollars - the thoughts and feelings of the dozens of central personalities who talked with surprising frankness to T.R. Reid Congressional Odyssey: The Saga of a Senate Bill makes fascinating reading for anyone interested in the people and the power struggles in the public eye, and behind closed doors, on Capitol Hill and in the White House.

Women of Congress

A Twentieth-century Odyssey
Author: Marcy Kaptur
Publisher: Cq Press
ISBN: N.A
Category: Political Science
Page: 256
View: 5499

Continue Reading →

Looks at the women who have served as legislators in the House and Senate since 1917, when Jeannette Rankin, the first woman elected to Congress, was sworn in

The Reporter's Handbook

An Investigator's Guide To Documents and Techniques
Author: Steve Weinberg
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780312135966
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 553
View: 3807

Continue Reading →

Details methods for locating documents and evidence

Ethics in Congress

From Individual to Institutional Corruption
Author: Dennis F. Thompson
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 9780815722977
Category: Political Science
Page: 267
View: 8330

Continue Reading →

More members of Congress have been investigated and sanctioned for ethical misconduct in the past decade and a half than in the entire previous history of the institution. But individual members are probably less corrupt than they once were. Stricter ethics codes and closer scrutiny by the press and public have imposed standards no previous representatives have had to face. Dennis Thompson shows how the institution itself is posing new ethical challenges, how the complexity of the environment in which members work creates new occasions for corruption and invites more calls for accountability. Instead of the individual corruption that has long been the center of attention, Thompson focuses on institutional corruption which refers to conduct that under certain conditions is an acceptable part of the job of a representative. Members are required to solicit campaign contributions, and they are expected to help constituents with their problems with government, but some ways of doing these jobs give rise to institutional corruption. The author moves the discussion beyond bribery, extortion, and simple personal gain to delve into implicit understandings, ambiguous favors, and political advantage. Thompson examines many major ethics cases of recent years. Among them: the case of David Durenberger, accused of supplementing his income through book promotions; the case of the Keating Five, accused of using undue influence with the Federal Home Loan Bank Board on behalf of Lincoln Savings and Loan owner Charles Keating; and the case of House Speaker James Wright, accused of several offenses. Thompson shows why neither the electoral process nor the judicial process is sufficient and argues for stronger ethics committees and the creation of a new quasi-independent body to take over some of the enforcement process. He offers more than a dozen recommendations for changes in the procedures and practices of ethics in Congress. The book features a listing of ethics charges, classified by type of corruption, considered by Congress from 1789 to 1992. Selected by Choice as an Outstanding Book of 1995

City of Rivals

Restoring the Glorious Mess of American Democracy
Author: Jason Grumet
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1493014129
Category: Political Science
Page: 288
View: 3905

Continue Reading →

Forty years ago the Watergate scandal deeply wounded Americans’ faith in government. Since then, good-government reformers and big-government opponents have been on a shared mission to make everything transparent. The problem is that too much light is scaring Congressmen away from making the tough choices necessary to govern in the national interest. It’s no secret that the backrooms are where things get done and where politicians can collaborate without reprisal. In City of Rivals, Grumet boldly argues that the answer lies in harnessing partisanship, not spinning in its mud. America is once again gripped by fear that we are falling behind and fast. Unlike the Soviet threat that shook our nation a half century ago, the menace today is homegrown. On issues of national importance, the two parties in Congress appear incapable of working together. Whether the threat is competition from China, crumbling infrastructure, or rising debt, Washington’s legitimacy to govern and capacity to solve problems are in doubt. The Bipartisan Policy Center’s president, Jason Grumet, tackles this issue head-on by challenging the conventional diagnosis of the current gridlock. Rather than lamenting our differences, Grumet offers practical steps to govern a polarized nation, and he explores the unintended consequences of past reform movements. It’s a must-read for all who care about our country’s future.

Congress Responds to the Twentieth Century


Author: Sunil Ahuja,Robert E. Dewhirst
Publisher: Ohio State University Press
ISBN: 9780814209400
Category: Political Science
Page: 266
View: 4019

Continue Reading →

Congress occupies a central place in the U.S. political system. Its reach into American society is vast and deep. Overtime, the issues it has confronted have increased in both quantity and complexity. At the beginning, Congress dealt with a handful of matters, whereas today it has its hands in every imaginable aspect of life. It has attempted to meet these challenges and has changed throughout the course of its history, prodded by factors both external and internal to the institution. The essays in this volume argue therefore that as society changed throughout the twentieth century, Congress responded to those changes.

The Sportsman

Unexpected Lessons from an Around-the-World Sports Odyssey
Author: Dhani Jones,Jonathan Grotenstein
Publisher: Rodale Books
ISBN: 1609611128
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 272
View: 9428

Continue Reading →

With 11 seasons in the NFL, Dhani Jones had an unusually long career for a football player. But early on, Dhani thought his playing days were over. Cut by the Eagles and the Saints, he was at a professional crossroads. When the Bengals called, though, he was more than ready and in the best shape of his life. And for that, he credits his off-season. The Sportsman follows Dhani's discovery that the parts of his life, which to many seemed to be distractions—including an off-season TV show that sent him around the world to learn and compete in other sports—actually served to cross-train him in ways he'd never imagined, enabling him to become more grounded, globally aware, and, most surprisingly, a much better football player. Part travelogue, part workout guide, part inspirational memoir, The Sportsman is an invigorating account of Dhani's global sporting adventures and the lessons he learned along the way. From dragon boat racing in Singapore to carrying 300-pound rocks in Iceland and biking in Italy, Dhani's adventures taught him to be tougher, smarter, and stronger than ever. The Sportsman is a reminder that by connecting to the world through its people and customs and the spirit of competition, we empower ourselves in ways that can surpass our craziest expectations.

Learning to Govern

An Institutional View of the 104th Congress
Author: Richard F. Fenno
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 9780815715665
Category: Political Science
Page: 70
View: 736

Continue Reading →

The elections of 1994 produced the first Republican-controlled Congress in 40 years. What effect did being the minority party for so long have on the activities of the new House of Representatives' majority? In this book, Richard Fenno makes the case that four decades out of power left Republicans without the experience they needed to properly interpret their electoral victory... or govern the country. This inexperience produced serious consequences for the party and the American political system, including the confrontational leadership of Newt Gingrich, the deterioration of cross-party civility, the general support for term limits, and an accelerated loss of public confidence in Congress. And there was more. Although all the evidence pointed to voters' repudiation of the Democrats, the Republicans saw their victory as a mandate for wholesale change—a Republican Revolution. Instead of trying to make careful, incremental changes, their inexperience and aggressive "let's get it all, and let's get it now" tactics cost them their golden opportunity and cleared the way for the reelection of President Clinton. This book provides a timely focus on the attitudes and agendas of the inexperienced Republican freshman class and its contribution to the problem-plagued attempts to use the election campaign Contract with America as a blueprint for governing.

Opting Out of Congress

Partisan Polarization and the Decline of Moderate Candidates
Author: Danielle M. Thomsen
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316878449
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 4263

Continue Reading →

This book provides a candidate entry explanation for partisan polarization in Congress. Danielle M. Thomsen draws on quantitative data to show that ideological moderates are less likely to run for and remain in Congress than those at the extremes. The book introduces a party fit argument for why moderates have opted out of congressional politics. It suggests that the personal and professional benefits of congressional service have diminished for liberal Republicans and conservative Democrats as the parties have drifted apart. Although the political center has long been deemed a coveted position in the legislature, it is now a lonely and lowly place to be. Opting Out of Congress argues that partisan polarization is unlikely to diminish if ideological moderates do not run for office, and reformers who seek to restore bipartisanship in Congress must consider how to encourage moderates to launch congressional candidacies.

The Power of a Plant

A Teacher's Odyssey to Grow Healthy Minds and Schools
Author: Stephen Ritz,Suzie Boss
Publisher: Rodale Books
ISBN: 1623368650
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 304
View: 509

Continue Reading →

In The Power of a Plant, globally acclaimed teacher and self-proclaimed CEO (Chief Eternal Optimist) Stephen Ritz shows you how, in one of the nation's poorest communities, his students thrive in school and in life by growing, cooking, eating, and sharing the bounty of their green classroom. What if we taught students that they have as much potential as a seed? That in the right conditions, they can grow into something great? These are the questions that Stephen Ritz--who became a teacher more than 30 years ago--sought to answer in 2004 in a South Bronx high school plagued by rampant crime and a dismal graduation rate. After what can only be defined as a cosmic experience when a flower broke up a fight in his classroom, he saw a way to start tackling his school's problems: plants. He flipped his curriculum to integrate gardening as an entry point for all learning and inadvertently created an international phenomenon. As Ritz likes to say, "Fifty thousand pounds of vegetables later, my favorite crop is organically grown citizens who are growing and eating themselves into good health and amazing opportunities." The Power of a Plant tells the story of a green teacher from the Bronx who let one idea germinate into a movement and changed his students' lives by learning alongside them. Since greening his curriculum, Ritz has seen near-perfect attendance and graduation rates, dramatically increased passing rates on state exams, and behavioral incidents slashed in half. In the poorest congressional district in America, he has helped create 2,200 local jobs and built farms and gardens while changing landscapes and mindsets for residents, students, and colleagues. Along the way, Ritz lost more than 100 pounds by eating the food that he and his students grow in school. The Power of a Plant is his story of hope, resilience, regeneration, and optimism.

The United States Senate

Chronology and Institutional Bibliography
Author: Alexander P. Kessler
Publisher: Nova Publishers
ISBN: 9781594548956
Category: History
Page: 97
View: 9525

Continue Reading →

Created in 1787, the United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. In the Senate, each state is equally represented by two members, regardless of population; as a result, the total membership of the body is 100. Senators serve for six-year terms that are staggered so elections are held for approximately one-third of the seats (a "class") every second year. The Vice President of the United States is the presiding officer of the Senate but is not a senator and does not vote except to break ties. The Senate is regarded as a more deliberative body than the House of Representatives; the Senate is smaller and its members serve longer terms, allowing for a more collegial and less partisan atmosphere that is somewhat more insulated from public opinion than the House. The Senate has several exclusive powers enumerated in the Constitution not granted to the House; most significantly, the President must ratify treaties and make important appointments "with the Advice and Consent of the Senate" (Article I). This fully-indexed chronology and institutional bibliography traces the sometimes tumultuous history of this august body.

Work over Welfare

The Inside Story of the 1996 Welfare Reform Law
Author: Ron Haskins
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 081573509X
Category: Political Science
Page: 450
View: 1790

Continue Reading →

Work over Welfare tells the inside story of the legislation that ended "welfare as we know it." As a key staffer on the House Ways and Means Committee, author Ron Haskins was one of the architects of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act of 1996. In this landmark book, he vividly portrays the political battles that produced the most dramatic overhaul of the welfare system since its creation as part of the New Deal. Haskins starts his story in the early 1990s, as a small group of Republicans lays the groundwork for welfare reform by developing innovative policies to encourage work and fight illegitimacy. These ideas, which included such controversial provisions as mandatory work requirements and time limits for welfare recipients, later became part of the Republicans' Contract with America and were ultimately passed into law. But their success was hardly foreordained. Haskins brings to life the often bitter House and Senate debates the Republican proposals provoked, as well as the backroom negotiations that kept welfare reform alive through two presidential vetoes. In the process, he illuminates both the personalities and the processes that were crucial to the ultimate passage of the 1996 bill. He also analyzes the changes it has wrought on the social and political landscape over the past decade. In Work over Welfare, Haskins has provided the most authoritative account of welfare reform to date. Anyone with an interest in social welfare or politics in general will learn a great deal from this insightful and revealing book.

The Healing of America

A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper, and Fairer Health Care
Author: T. R. Reid
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143118218
Category: Medical
Page: 290
View: 667

Continue Reading →

A best-selling author guides a whirlwind tour of successful health-care systems worldwide, disproving American myths of "socialized medicine" to find possible paths toward reform. Reprint.

Congressman Doc Hastings

Twenty Years of Turmoil
Author: C. Mark Smith ((Of Richland, Washington))
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781945271786
Category: Legislators
Page: N.A
View: 3713

Continue Reading →

Part biography, part history, and part commentary, "Doc" chronicles the life and political career of congressman Richard "Doc" Hastings during some of the most momentous events in modern political history. Drawn from personal interviews, letters and emails, recorded speeches and other contemporary accounts, Hastings' ten terms in Congress are described against a sweeping backdrop of political intrigue, scandal, presidential impeachment, the 9/11 attack, natural disasters, two wars, multiple budget crises, and the Great Recession, that have contributed to the growing partisan divide among the American people and the growing organizational dysfunction of their government.--Publisher.

An American Odyssey

The Bob Mathias Story
Author: Bob Mathias,Robert Mendes
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 1613212674
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 244
View: 8435

Continue Reading →

Bob Mathias is a true 20th-century American hero. The youngest man ever to win the Olympic decathlon gold medal, and the only American ever to win it twice, Mathias was also a movie star, U.S. Marine, writer, four-term congressman, and architect of America's Olympic renaissance. In addition, he was recently named by both ESPN and the Associated Press as one of the century's 100 greatest athletes. In his autobiography, this American original offers incisive comments on many of the famous people and events he witnessed during his long and distinguished career of public service. He talks about the old-fashioned values he grew up with, and how they still have a place in a changing culture. He discusses the current state of athletics, what colleges should be doing for their scholarship athletes but aren't, the total collapse of "amateurism" worldwide, and the million-dollar salaries being paid to mediocre athletes. He also offers practical, down-to-earth solutions to many of the problems he sees facing not only athletics, but also our country and the world. This book is a lively, well-written account of a unique life, lived to its fullest potential, and includes some never-before-published pictures that can only be described as collectors' items.

Working Congress

A Guide for Senators, Representatives, and Citizens
Author: Robert Mann
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807157392
Category: Political Science
Page: 128
View: 6929

Continue Reading →

In 1964, as the polarizing Civil Rights Act made its way through the House and Senate, and Congress navigated one of the most tumultuous eras in American history, a Harris Poll put the institution's approval rating at 60 percent. Why then, fifty years later, has the public's approval of Congress eroded to an all-time low of 10 percent? Working Congress: A Guide for Senators, Representatives, and Citizens seeks to isolate the reasons for Congress's staggering decline in public opinion, and to propose remedies to reverse the grave dysfunction in America's most important political institution. Aided by the input of retired members of Congress from both major parties, editor Robert Mann and his fellow contributors identify paralyzing partisan rancor as perhaps the most significant reason for the American public's declining support of its main representative body. The lack of mutual trust within Congress reflects (and creates) the suspicion and animosity of the great majority of Americans. Working Congress argues that members of Congress must find a path to cooperation if they are to function as the representative institution the Founders intended. Trenchant chapters by Mickey Edwards, Ross K. Baker, Frances E. Lee, Brian L. Fife, Susan Herbst, and Mark Kennedy analyze the problems and challenges facing Congress and suggest solutions to counteract partisan gridlock. Though these scholars and former members share a conviction that men and women of good will can and should work together, they do not assume that their solutions will herald a bipartisan utopia. Instead, they recognize that Congress is, and will always be, a work in progress.