Comparative Criminal Procedure

History, Processes and Case Studies
Author: Raneta Lawson Mack
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780837740331
Category: Criminal procedure
Page: 312
View: 2653

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"The current globalization of informational access, criminal activity and terrorist interdiction highlights the criminal justice processes in countries around the world. In this emerging global community, comparative analysis of criminal justice is important for gaining an understanding of the complex values that define conceptions of justice across the globe. This book takes a holistic approach to comparative analyses by examining individual processes as a means to highlight differences among systems, while simultaneously exploring and illustrating the historical and procedural contexts that explain why those differences occur."--Résumé de l'éditeur.

Plea Bargaining in National and International Law


Author: Regina Rauxloh
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415597862
Category: Law
Page: 285
View: 1495

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Plea bargaining is one of the most important and most discussed issues in modern criminal procedure law. Based on historical and comparative legal research, the author has analysed the wide-spread use of plea bargaining in different criminal justice systems. The book sets out in-depth studies of consensual case dispositions in the UK, examining how plea bargaining has developed and spread in England and Wales. It also goes on to discusses in detail the problems that this practise poses for the rule of law by avoiding procedural safe-guards. The book draws on empirical research in its examination of the absence of informal settlements in the former GDR, offering a unique insight into criminal procedure in a socialist legal system that has been little studied. Drawing on her research findings, the author goes on to discuss the extent to which plea bargaining should be developed in the International Criminal Court in The Hague, as the question of this practise is set to be one of the seminal debates in the development of international criminal procedures in the new International Criminal Court. Plea Bargaining in National and International Law will be of particular interest to academics and students of international criminal law, criminal procedures and comparative law.

Comparative Criminal Procedure


Author: Jacqueline E. Ross,Stephen C. Thaman
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing
ISBN: 1781007195
Category: Law
Page: 576
View: 3326

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This Handbook presents innovative research that compares different criminal procedure systems by focusing on the mechanisms by which legal systems seek to avoid error, protect rights, ground their legitimacy, expand lay participation in the criminal process and develop alternatives to criminal trials, such as plea bargaining, as well as alternatives to the criminal process as a whole, such as intelligence operations. The criminal procedures examined in this book include those of the United States, Germany, France, Spain, Russia, India, Latin America, Taiwan and Japan, among others.

International and Comparative Criminal Justice

A critical introduction
Author: Mark J. Findlay
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136184155
Category: Social Science
Page: 352
View: 3191

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International criminal justice is in transition. This book explores the growing internationalisation of criminal justice as a phenomenon of global governance. It provides students with a critical understanding of the international institutions for regulating transnational crime, the development of alternative justice processes across the globe, and international and supra-national co-operation criminal justice policies and practices. Key topics covered include: The historical development of International Criminal Justice institutions and traditions International Restorative Justice Victim communities and collaborative justice The relationship between crime and war International Human Rights The ‘War on Terror’ The globalisation of crime and control Developments in global governance, communitarian justice and accountability This text will familiarize students with the literature and debates surrounding international criminal justice and enable them to critically appreciate their theoretical and policy context. In doing so, it encourages students to assess the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to the study of global justice and the analysis of comparative policy convergence and research. It will also help students to reflect on, and communicate in an informed and critical way theoretical accounts and empirical studies within the field of international criminal justice. This book will be essential reading for upper level undergraduates taking courses in criminal law, international relations and governance and postgraduates engaged in international criminal justice, international law, regulation and governance and human rights.

The Handbook of Comparative Criminal Law


Author: Kevin Jon Heller,Markus Dubber
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804777292
Category: Law
Page: 672
View: 3116

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This handbook explores criminal law systems from around the world, with the express aim of stimulating comparison and discussion. General principles of criminal liability receive prominent coverage in each essay—including discussions of rationales for punishment, the role and design of criminal codes, the general structure of criminal liability, accounts of mens rea, and the rights that criminal law is designed to protect—before the authors turn to more specific offenses like homicide, theft, sexual offenses, victimless crimes, and terrorism. This key reference covers all of the world's major legal systems—common, civil, Asian, and Islamic law traditions—with essays on sixteen countries on six different continents. The introduction places each country within traditional distinctions among legal systems and explores noteworthy similarities and differences among the countries covered, providing an ideal entry into the fascinating range of criminal law systems in use the world over.

The Origins of Adversary Criminal Trial


Author: John H. Langbein
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0199258880
Category: Law
Page: 354
View: 7779

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The lawyer-dominated adversary system of criminal trial, which now typifies practice in Anglo-American legal systems, developed in England in the eighteenth century. Using hitherto unexplored sources from London's Old Bailey Court, Professor Langbein shows how and why lawyers were able to capture the trial, and he supplies a path-breaking account of the formation of the law of criminal evidence.

Comparative Criminal Justice and Globalization


Author: Professor David Nelken
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409497615
Category: Social Science
Page: 228
View: 4180

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In this exciting and topical collection, leading scholars discuss the implications of globalisation for the fields of comparative criminology and criminal justice. How far does it still make sense to distinguish nation states, for example in comparing prison rates? Is globalisation best treated as an inevitable trend or as an interactive process? How can globalisation's effects on space and borders be conceptualised? How does it help to create norms and exceptions? The editor, David Nelken, is a Distinguished Scholar of the American Sociological Association, a recipient of the Sellin-Glueck award of the American Society of Criminology, and an Academician of the Academy of Social Sciences, UK. He teaches a course on Comparative Criminal Justice as Visiting Professor in Criminology at Oxford University's Centre of Criminology.

Legal Dissonance

The Interaction of Criminal Law and Customary Law in Papua New Guinea
Author: Shaun Larcom
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1782386491
Category: Social Science
Page: 188
View: 6669

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Papua New Guinea's two most powerful legal orders - customary law and state law -undermine one another in criminal matters. This phenomenon, called legal dissonance, partly explains the low level of personal security found in many parts of the country. This book demonstrates that a lack of coordination in the punishing of wrong behavior is both problematic for legal orders themselves and for those who are subject to such legal phenomena Legal dissonance can lead to behavior being simultaneously promoted by one legal order and punished by the other, leading to injustice, and, perhaps more importantly, undermining the ability of both legal orders to deter wrongdoing.

Human Rights and Criminal Procedure

The Case Law of the European Court of Human Rights
Author: Jeremy McBride
Publisher: Council of Europe
ISBN: 9789287166890
Category: Law
Page: 398
View: 1073

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This handbook is intended to assist judges, lawyers and prosecutors to take account of the many requirements of the European Convention on Human Rights - both explicit and implicit - for the criminal process when interpreting and applying Codes of Criminal Procedure and comparable or related legislation. It does so through extracts from key rulings of the European Court of Human Rights and the former European Commission of Human Rights dealing with complaints about violations of Convention rights and freedoms in the course of the investigation, prosecution and trial of alleged offences, as well as in the course of appellate and various other proceedings linked to the criminal process. The extracts are significant not only because the mere text of the Convention is insufficient to indicate the scope of what is entailed by it but also because the circumstances of the cases selected give a sense of how to apply the requirements in concrete situations.

Comparative Criminal Justice


Author: Francis Pakes
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135982368
Category: Social Science
Page: 248
View: 2685

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This book offers an accessible introduction to comparative criminal justice and examines and reflects on the ways different countries and jurisdictions deal with the main stages in the criminal justice process, from policing to sentencing. This popular bestseller has been fully updated and expanded for the third edition. This textbook provides the reader with: a comparative perspective on criminal justice and its main components; a knowledge of methodology for comparative research and analysis; an understanding of the emerging concepts in comparative criminal justice, such as security, surveillance, retribution and rehabilitation; a discussion of global trends such as the global drop in crime, the punitive turn, penal populism, privatization, international policing and international criminal tribunals. The new edition has been fully updated to keep abreast with this growing field of study and research, including increased coverage of the challenge of globalization and its role and influence on criminal justice systems around the world. Topics such as state crime, genocide and the international criminal court have also grown in prominence since the publication of the last edition and are given increased coverage. This book will be perfect reading for advanced undergraduates and postgraduates taking courses in comparative criminal justice and those who are engaged in the study of global responses to crime. New features such as lists of further reading, study questions and boxed case studies help bring comparative criminal justice alive for students and instructors alike.

Defendant Participation in the Criminal Process


Author: Abenaa Owusu- Bempah
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317664698
Category: Law
Page: 200
View: 617

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Requirements for the defendant to actively participate in the English criminal process have been increasing in recent years such that the defendant can now be penalised for their non-cooperation. This book explores the changes to the defendant’s role as a participant in the criminal process and the ramifications of penalising a defendant’s non-cooperation, particularly its effect on the adversarial system. The book develops a normative theory which proposes that the criminal process should operate as a mechanism for calling the state to account for its accusations and request for official condemnation and punishment of the accused. It goes on to examine the limitations placed on the privilege against self-incrimination, the curtailment of the right to silence, and the defendant’s duty to disclose the details of his or her case prior to trial. The book shows that, by placing participatory requirements on defendants and penalising them for their non-cooperation, a system of obligatory participation has developed. This development is the consequence of pursuing efficient fact-finding with little regard for principles of fairness or the rights of the defendant.

Inside China's Legal System


Author: Chang Wang,Nathan Madson
Publisher: Chandos Publishing
ISBN: 0857094610
Category: Law
Page: 390
View: 5556

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China’s legal system is vast and complex, and robust scholarship on the subject is difficult to obtain. Inside China’s Legal System provides readers with a comprehensive look at the system including how it works in practice, theoretical and historical underpinnings, and how it might evolve. The first section of the book explains the Communist Party’s utilitarian approach to law: rule by law. The second section discusses Confucian and Legalist views on morality, law and punishment, and the influence such traditional Chinese thinking has on contemporary Chinese law. The third section focuses on the roles of key players (including judges, prosecutors, lawyers, and legal academics) in the Chinese legal system. The fourth section offers Chinese legal case studies in civil, criminal, administrative, and international law. The book concludes with a comparison of China’s fundamental governing and legal principles with those of the United States, in such areas as checks and balances, separation of powers, and due process. Uses extensive legal materials and historical documents generally unavailable to Western based academics Gives insider knowledge, including first-hand experience teaching law, and close involvement with judges, attorneys, and law professors in China Analyses legal issues from historical and cultural perspectives holistically

Principles of German Criminal Procedure


Author: Michael Bohlander
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1847318983
Category: Law
Page: 326
View: 2565

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The book aims to outlinie the fundamental aspects of the German approach to criminal procedure; it is meant as a companion volume to the author's earlier publications, 'The German Criminal Code - A Modern English Translation', and 'Principles of German Criminal Law', also with Hart. In appropriate cases, comparisons to English and Welsh law have been drawn. The chapters cover a wide range of issues from setting out the basic procedural principles to presenting the main players in the criminal justice system, pre-trial investigations, the path from indictment to trial judgment, rules of evidence, sentencing, and appeals and post-conviction review. As far as it is useful for an introductory text, the differences between proceedings against adults and juveniles are highlighted. The theoretical discussion of decision-making and style of judgment writing is supported by practical insights through specimen translations of an indictment, a trial judgment and an appellate judgment by the Federal Court of Justice.

Criminal Evidence


Author: Paul Roberts,Adrian Zuckerman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199231648
Category: Law
Page: 729
View: 4777

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Based on Adrian Zuckerman's 'The Principles of Criminal Evidence', this book presents a comprehensive treatment of the fundamental principles & underlying logic of the law of criminal evidence. It includes changes relating to presumption of innocence, privilege against self-incrimination, character, & the law of corroboration.

Participation in Crime

Domestic and Comparative Perspectives
Author: Alan Reed,Michael Bohlander
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317084004
Category: Social Science
Page: 512
View: 3330

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Following on from the earlier edited collection, Loss of Control and Diminished Responbility, this book is the first volume in the Substantive Issues in Criminal Law series. It serves as a leading point of reference in the area relating to participation in crime and identifies the need for a consistent approach to the doctrinal and theoretical underpinnings of complicity liability. With a section on the UK analysing points of current interest, the book also has a large comparative section dealing with foreign jurisdictions and examines on the basis of a unified research grid how different legal systems treat core issues of participation in the context of criminal law. This book is a valuable reference resource for those in the criminal justice community in the UK and abroad and for academics, the judiciary and policy-makers.

European Criminal Procedures


Author: Mireille Delmas-Marty,J. R. Spencer
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521591102
Category: Law
Page: 775
View: 6393

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Revised by Elena Ricci

World Criminal Justice Systems

A Comparative Survey
Author: Richard J. Terrill
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317228812
Category: Social Science
Page: 768
View: 4559

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World Criminal Justice Systems, Ninth Edition, provides an understanding of major world criminal justice systems by discussing and comparing the systems of six of the world’s countries -- each representative of a different type of legal system. An additional chapter on Islamic law uses three examples to illustrate the range of practice within Sharia. Political, historical, organizational, procedural, and critical issues confronting the justice systems are explained and analyzed. Each chapter contains material on government, police, judiciary, law, corrections, juvenile justice, and other critical issues. The ninth edition features an introduction directing students to the resources they need to understand comparative criminal justice theory and methodology. The chapter on Russia includes consideration of the turmoil in post-Soviet successor states, and the final chapter on Islamic law examines the current status of criminal justice systems in the Middle East.

Abuse of Process and Judicial Stays of Criminal Proceedings


Author: Andrew L.-T. Choo
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198258011
Category: Law
Page: 207
View: 958

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This book is about the judicial discretion to stay criminal proceedings, and is the first full-length monograph to be published in England on the topic. It presents a fresh perspective on the discretion under consideration by setting the discretion against the general backdrop of the law of criminal evidence. In recent times, a number of evidence scholars have demonstrated persuasively that every exclusionary rule and exclusionary discretion in the law of criminal evidence can be explained by reference to the protection of the innocent from wrongful conviction and/or the protection of the moral integrity of the criminal process. It is demonstrated in this book that the judicial discretion to stay criminal proceedings can, and should, be viewed in the same way. A comparative perspective is adopted where appropriate, with particular reference being made to the jurisdictions of Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, and the United States.

Ceasefire Agreements and Peace Processes

A Comparative Study
Author: Malin Akebo
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317204131
Category: Political Science
Page: 230
View: 7946

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This book analyses and compares ceasefire agreements as part of peace processes in intrastate armed conflicts. Research repeatedly underscores the importance of ceasefire agreements in peace processes but suggests that they can influence such processes in fundamentally different ways. However, despite contradictory expectations, remarkably few studies have so far been devoted to systematic and in-depth analysis of ceasefire agreements in contemporary intrastate armed conflicts. This book contributes to filling this gap by using a process-oriented conflict dynamics approach to analyse and explain how ceasefire agreements are being influenced by and in turn influences the broader dynamics of peace processes. Empirically, the book focuses on the armed conflicts in Aceh (Indonesia) and Sri Lanka. Based on document studies and 57 interviews with key actors, it presents comparative insights and in-depth knowledge about ceasefire agreements in different contextual settings. The book problematizes the common assumption in the literature that ceasefire agreements create momentum in peace processes and pave the way to peace, and it provides a more nuanced analysis and understanding based on two empirical cases analysed within a comparative framework. In contrast to conventional wisdom, it demonstrates how ceasefires on the contrary also can have negative implications on peace processes. This book will be of much interest to students of conflict resolution, peace studies, intra-state conflict, security studies and IR in general.

Presumption of Innocence in Peril

A Comparative Critical Perspective
Author: Anthony Gray
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 1498554113
Category: Political Science
Page: 208
View: 6358

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This book explains the historical significance and introduction of the presumption of innocence into common law legal systems. It explains that the presumption should be seen as reflecting notions of moral comfort around judgment of others. Specifically, when one is asked to make a judgment about the guilt or otherwise of a person accused of wrongdoing, the default position should be to do nothing. This reflects the very serious consequences of what we do when we decide someone is guilty of wrongdoing and is not a step to be taken lightly. Traditionally, decision makers have only taken it when they are morally comfortable with that decision. It then documents how legislators in a range of common law jurisdictions have undermined the presumption of innocence, through measures such as reverse onus provisions, allowing or requiring inferences to be made against an accused, redefining offenses and defenses in novel ways to minimize the burden on the prosecutor, and by dressing proceedings as civil when they are in substance criminal. Courts have too easily acceded to such measures, in the process permitting accused persons to be convicted although there is reasonable doubt as to their guilt, and where they are not guilty of sufficiently blameworthy conduct to attract criminal sanction. It finds that the courts must be prepared to re-assert the prime importance of the presumption of innocence, only permitting criminal sanctions to be imposed where they are morally certain that the accused did that of which they have been accused, and morally comfortable that the conduct being addressed is worthy of the kind of criminal sanction which prosecutors seek to impose. Courts must be morally comfortable about the finding of guilt, and the imposition of the criminal penalty in a given case. They have lost sight of this moral underpinning to criminal law process and substance, and it must be regained.