Citizenship in Britain: A History

A History
Author: Derek Heater
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748626727
Category: Political Science
Page: 272
View: 9841

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An historical introduction to the varieties of citizenship in Britain, starting in the Middle Ages and bringing the story right up to the present day. Both the status and understanding of citizenship in practice and the theoretical and advisory writings on the subject are introduced, and their inter-relationships are explored. Organised chronologically, each chapter is divided into sections in order to present the reader with different themes in a manageable form. The focus throughout is on accessibility, with no previous knowledge of the subject being assumed.

Whitewashing Britain

Race and Citizenship in the Postwar Era
Author: Kathleen Paul
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801484407
Category: History
Page: 253
View: 7555

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In the late 1940s, the Labour government faced a birthrate perceived to be in decline, massive economic dislocations caused by the war, a huge national debt, severe labor shortages, and the prospective loss of international preeminence. Simultaneously, it subsidized the emigration of Britons to Australia, Canada, and other parts of the Empire, recruited Irish citizens and European refugees to work in Britain, and used regulatory changes to dissuade British subjects of color from coming to the United Kingdom. Paul contends post-war concepts of citizenship were based on a contradiction between the formal definition of who had the right to enter Britain and the informal notion of who was, or could become, really British.

Imperial Citizenship

Empire and the Question of Belonging
Author: Daniel Gorman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0719082145
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 9842

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"This is the first book-length study of the ideological foundations of British imperialism in the early twentieth century. By focusing on the concept of imperial citizenship, the book illustrates how the political, cultural and intellectual underpinnings of Empire were constructed and challenged by forces in both Britain and the 'Britons overseas', in the settlement colonies of Canada, South Africa, New Zealand and Australia. Debates about imperial citizenship reveal how Britons conceived the Empire: was it an extension of the nation-state, a collection of separate and distinct communities, or a type of 'world state'? These debates also discussed the place of Empire in British society, its importance to the national identity and the degree to which imperial subjects were or were not seen as 'fellow Britons'. This public discourse was at its most fervent from the South African War (1899-1902) to the early 1920s, when Britain emerged victorious, shocked and exhausted from the Great War."--Back cover.

At Home in Two Countries

The Past and Future of Dual Citizenship
Author: Peter J Spiro
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814785824
Category: Law
Page: 208
View: 7101

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The rise of dual citizenship could hardly have been imaginable to a time traveler from a hundred or even fifty years ago. Dual nationality was once considered an offense to nature, an abomination on the order of bigamy. It was the stuff of titanic battles between the United States and European sovereigns. As those conflicts dissipated, dual citizenship continued to be an oddity, a condition that, if not quite freakish, was nonetheless vaguely disreputable, a status one could hold but not advertise. Even today, some Americans mistakenly understand dual citizenship to somehow be “illegal”, when in fact it is completely tolerated. Only recently has the status largely shed the opprobrium to which it was once attached. At Home in Two Countries charts the history of dual citizenship from strong disfavor to general acceptance. The status has touched many; there are few Americans who do not have someone in their past or present who has held the status, if only unknowingly. The history reflects on the course of the state as an institution at the level of the individual. The state was once a jealous institution, justifiably demanding an exclusive relationship with its members. Today, the state lacks both the capacity and the incentive to suppress the status as citizenship becomes more like other forms of membership. Dual citizenship allows many to formalize sentimental attachments. For others, it’s a new way to game the international system. This book explains why dual citizenship was once so reviled, why it is a fact of life after globalization, and why it should be embraced today.

Which People's War?

National Identity and Citizenship in Wartime Britain 1939-1945
Author: Sonya O. Rose
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0199273170
Category: History
Page: 328
View: 2033

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Which People's War? examines how national belonging, or British national identity, was envisaged in the public culture of the World War II home front. Using materials from newspapers, magazines, films, novels, diaries, letters, and all sorts of public documents, it explores such questions as: who was included as 'British' and what did it mean to be British? How did the British describe themselves as a singular people, and what were the consequences of those depictions? It also examines the several meanings of citizenship elaborated in various discussions concerning the British nation at war. This investigation of the powerful constructions of national identity and understandings of citizenship circulating in Britain during the Second World War exposes their multiple and contradictory consequences at the time. It reveals the fragility of any singular conception of 'Britishness' even during a war that involved the total mobilization of the country's citizenry and cost 400,000 British civilian lives.

Citizenship in Britain

Values, Participation and Democracy
Author: Charles Pattie,Patrick Seyd,Paul Whiteley
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521534642
Category: Political Science
Page: 346
View: 5740

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There are increasing concerns about changes in society and the economy which are undermining the effectiveness of democracy and weakening traditional conceptions of citizenship. What does it mean to be a British citizen in the early part of the twenty-first century? This book presents the first major empirical study of citizenship in Britain, comprising surveys of political participation and voluntary activities, and of the beliefs and values which underpin them. As well as presenting new data, the authors provide a sophisticated discussion of the concept of citizenship, and the consequences of a lack of civic engagement in a modern democracy. It examines why some people are 'good' citizens when others are 'bad' and it explores the consequences of citizenship for policy-makers and democracy. Comprehensive and accessible, this book makes a major contribution to our understanding of civic attitudes in Britain today and will appeal to students, researchers and policy-makers.

Women's Suffrage in the British Empire

Citizenship, Nation and Race
Author: Ian Christopher Fletcher,Philippa Levine,Laura E. Nym Mayhall
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113563999X
Category: History
Page: 280
View: 4620

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This edited collection examines the campaign for women's suffrage from an international perspective. Leading international scholars explore the relationship between suffragism and other areas of social and political struggle, and examine the ideological and cultural implications of gendered constructions of 'race', nation and empire. The book includes comprehensive case-studies of Britain, India, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and Palestine.

Learning to Teach Citizenship in the Secondary School

A companion to school experience
Author: Liam Gearon
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317596404
Category: Education
Page: 344
View: 6452

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Praise for previous editions... 'A comprehensive and illuminating resource on both citizenship and citizenship education.' – David Hicks, Times Educational Supplement What is the role of citizenship? How can it be taught effectively? Learning to Teach Citizenship in the Secondary School is an essential resource for students training to teach citizenship in the secondary school as well as teachers of citizenship looking for fresh ideas and guidance. Written by leading experts in the field, the book is underpinned by the latest research and theory and explores a variety of inspirational approaches to teaching and learning in a subject which provides a critical underpinning to the whole school curriculum. This new, third edition has been comprehensively updated and restructured to emphasise the role of citizenship across the curriculum, exploring a wider range of subjects including geography, modern foreign languages, mathematics and science. Key topics include: historical origins and contemporary contexts developing subject knowledge and skills of enquiry effective lesson plans, schemes of work and assessment citizenship beyond the classroom: community-based work and learning outdoors citizenship across the curriculum: English, drama and media; history, geography and religious education; modern foreign languages; mathematics and science; and RE research in citizenship. Including key objectives and chapter summaries, together with carefully developed tasks to support your own professional development, Learning to Teach Citizenship in the Secondary School is designed to develop theoretically informed good practice in citizenship education. It is a source of support, guidance and creative ideas for all training citizenship teachers and those teaching the subject as non-specialists, and offers specialists new insight into this crucial subject.

In Limbo

Brexit Testimonies from EU Citizens in the UK
Author: Elena Remigi,Tim Sykes,Véronique Martin
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781548026080
Category: Citizenship
Page: 262
View: 7806

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Imagine... Imagine you left your native country because you wanted to explore your neighbouring world and embrace the European dream. Imagine you truly believed that the European Union was your home and that, as well as being a citizen of the country you were born in, you were also a citizen of Europe. Imagine you fell deeply in love with your new country. Imagine you built a life there, married, had children, a career, started a business... You felt happy and totally integrated. You were at home. Then one day, your new country decides to vote to leave the European Union, which means that all the rules you have built your life on are going to change. One morning, after years and even decades, you suddenly feel unwelcome, unwanted, betrayed. Your certainties, your life and your security are gone. Your sense of identity too. Through no fault of your own, you are stuck in a painful limbo. This is what has happened since the Brexit Referendum in June 2016 to the EU citizens who have made their life in the UK. This book of testimonies is their voice, their stories from Limbo, haunted by the poignant question: where is home? The book trailer on Youtube: https: //youtu.be/XAPuURRng9Q

Journal of the Civil War Era

Fall 2014 Issue
Author: William A. Blair
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469615991
Category: History
Page: 144
View: 5445

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The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 4, Number 3, September 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS Editor's Note, William Blair Articles Felicity Turner Rights and the Ambiguities of Law: Infanticide in the Nineteenth-Century U.S. South Paul Quigley Civil War Conscription and the International Boundaries of Citizenship Jay Sexton William H. Seward in the World Review Essay Patick J. Kelly the European Revolutions of 1848 and the Transnational turn in Civil War History Book Reviews Books Received Notes on Contributors

The European Union: A Citizen's Guide


Author: Chris Bickerton
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141983108
Category: Political Science
Page: 256
View: 5587

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The essential Pelican introduction to the European Union - its history, its politics, and its role today For most of us today, 'Europe' refers to the European Union. At the centre of a seemingly never-ending crisis, the EU remains a black box, closed to public understanding. Is it a state? An empire? Is Europe ruled by Germany or by European bureaucrats? Does a single European economy exist after all these years of economic integration? And should the EU have been awarded the Nobel peace prize in 2012? Critics tell us the EU undermines democracy. Are they right? In this provocative volume, political scientist Chris Bickerton provides an answer to all these key questions and more at a time when understanding what the EU is and what it does is more important than ever before.

Citizenship, Nation, Empire

The Politics of History Teaching in England, 1870-1930
Author: Yeandle Peter
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 184779999X
Category: History
Page: 224
View: 8216

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Citizenship, nation, empire investigates the extent to which popular imperialism influenced the teaching of history between 1870 and 1930. It is the first book-length study to trace the substantial impact of educational psychology on the teaching of history, probing its impact on textbooks, literacy primers and teacher-training manuals. Educationists identified 'enlightened patriotism' to be the core objective of historical education. This was neither tub-thumping jingoism, nor state-prescribed national-identity teaching, but rather a carefully crafted curriculum for all children which fused civic as well as imperial ambitions. The book details contemporary debates about the purpose of history teaching and the influence of late-Victorian and Edwardian educational culture, and goes on to examine how pedagogical developments shaped the content of early-years reading books and textbooks through analysis of key themes including race, seafaring, gender and national identity. Special attention is paid to the significance of mass schooling in the formation of turn-of-the-twentieth-century cultures of hero worship, and the legacy of such developments for the 1920s. This volume will be of interest to those studying or researching aspects of English domestic imperial culture, especially those concerned with questions of childhood and schooling, citizenship, educational publishing and Anglo-British relations. Given that vitriolic debates about the politics of history teaching have endured into the twenty-first century, Citizenship, nation, empire is a timely study of the formative influences that shaped the history curriculum in English schools.

Citizenship and Immigration in Postwar Britain


Author: Randall Hansen
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0191583014
Category: Political Science
Page: 316
View: 5057

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In this contentious and ground-breaking study, the author draws on extensive archival research to provide a new account of the transforamtion of the United Kingdom into a multicultural society through an analysis of the evolution of immigration and citizenship policy since 1945. Against the prevailing academic orthodoxy, he argues that British immigration policy was not racist but both rational and liberal. - ;In this ground-breaking book, the author draws extensively on archival material and theortical advances in the social science literature. Citizenship and Immigration in Post-war Britain examines the transformation since 1945 of the UK from a homogeneous into a multicultural society. Rejecting a dominant strain of sociological and historical inquiry emphasizing state racism, Hansen argues that politicians and civil servants were overall liberal relative to the public, to which they owed their office, and that they pursued policies that were rational for any liberal democratic politician. He explains the trajectory of British migration and nationality policy - its exceptional liberality in the 1950s, its restrictiveness after then, and its tortured and seemingly racist definition of citizenship. The combined effect of a 1948 imperial definition of citizenship (adopted independently of immigration), and a primary commitment to migration from the Old Dominions, locked British politicians into a series of policy choices resulting in a migration and nationality regime that was not racist in intention, but was racist in effect. In the context of a liberal elite and an illiberal public, Britain's current restrictive migration policies result not from the faling of its policy-makers but from those of its institutions. -

Active Citizenship


Author: Bernard Crick
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748686525
Category: Political Science
Page: 224
View: 6538

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Considers the possibilities for active citizenship within areas of broad concern in UK politics: young people and justice; parliaments with the people; women and equality; integrating immigrants; multiculturalism; schools; community; social inclusion and

Life in the United Kingdom

A Guide for New Residents [large Print Version]
Author: Life in the United Kingdom Advisory Group,Great Britain: Home Office
Publisher: TSO
ISBN: 9780113413591
Category:
Page: 216
View: 2884

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This is the only official handbook for the new Life in the UK tests taken on or after 25 March 2013. This large print version contains all the official learning material for the test and is written in clear, simple language - making it easy to understand. This essential handbook covers a range of topics you need to know to pass your test and apply for UK citizenship or permanent residency, including: The process of becoming a citizen or permanent resident; the values and principles of the UK; traditions and culture from around the UK; the events and people that have shaped the UK's history; the government and the law; getting involved in your community

A Brief History of Citizenship


Author: Derek Heater
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814736718
Category: History
Page: 155
View: 5824

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“Patrolling the neighborhoods of central Fort Worth, sorting through trash piles, exploring dumpsters, scanning the streets and the gutters for items lost or discarded, I gathered the city's degraded bounty, then returned home to sort and catalogue the take.” —From the Introduction In December of 2001 Jeff Ferrell quit his job as tenured professor, moved back to his hometown of Fort Worth, Texas, and, with a place to live but no real income, began an eight-month odyssey of essentially living off of the street. Empire of Scrounge tells the story of this unusual journey into the often illicit worlds of scrounging, recycling, and second-hand living. Existing as a dumpster diver and trash picker, Ferrell adopted a way of life that was both field research and free-form survival. Riding around on his scrounged BMX bicycle, Ferrell investigated the million-dollar mansions, working-class neighborhoods, middle class suburbs, industrial and commercial strips, and the large downtown area, where he found countless discarded treasures, from unopened presents and new clothes to scrap metal and even food. Richly illustrated throughout, Empire of Scrounge is both a personal journey and a larger tale about the changing values of American society. Perhaps nowhere else do the fault lines of inequality get reflected so clearly than at the curbside trash can, where one person's garbage often becomes another's bounty. Throughout this engaging narrative, full of a colorful cast of characters, from the mansion living suburbanites to the junk haulers themselves, Ferrell makes a persuasive argument about the dangers of over-consumption. With landfills overflowing, today’s highly disposable culture produces more trash than ever before—and yet the urge to consume seems limitless. In the end, while picking through the city's trash was often dirty and unpleasant work, unearthing other people's discards proved to be unquestionably illuminating. After all, what we throw away says more about us than what we keep.

London Is the Place for Me

Black Britons, Citizenship and the Politics of Race
Author: Kennetta Hammond Perry
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190240202
Category: Africa
Page: 336
View: 6348

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Black people in the British Empire have long challenged the notion that "there ain't no black in the Union Jack." For the post-World War II wave of Afro-Caribbean migrants, many of whom had long been subjects of the Empire, claims to a British identity and imperial citizenship were considered to be theirs by birthright. However, while Britain was internationally touted as a paragon of fair play and equal justice, they arrived in a nation that was frequently hostile and unwilling to incorporate Black people into its concept of what it meant to be British. Black Britons therefore confronted the racial politics of British citizenship and became active political agents in challenging anti-Black racism. In a society with a highly racially circumscribed sense of identity-and the laws, customs, and institutions to back it up-Black Britons had to organize and fight to assert their right to belong. In London Is The Place for Me, Kennetta Hammond Perry explores how Afro-Caribbean migrants navigated the politics of race and citizenship in Britain and reconfigured the boundaries of what it meant to be both Black and British at a critical juncture in the history of Empire and twentieth century transnational race politics. She situates their experience within a broader context of Black imperial and diasporic political participation, and examines the pushback-both legal and physical-that the migrants' presence provoked. Bringing together a variety of sources including calypso music, photographs, migrant narratives, and records of grassroots Black political organizations, London Is the Place for Me positions Black Britons as part of wider public debates both at home and abroad about citizenship, the meaning of Britishness and the politics of race in the second half of the twentieth century. The United Kingdom's postwar discriminatory curbs on immigration and explosion of racial violence forced White Britons as well as Black to question their perception of Britain as a racially progressive society and, therefore, to question the very foundation of their own identities. Perry's examination expands our understanding of race and the Black experience in Europe and uncovers the critical role that Black people played in the formation of contemporary British society.

Nation and Citizenship in the Twentieth-Century British Novel


Author: Janice Ho
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107084466
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 236
View: 8178

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Nation and Citizenship in the Twentieth-Century British Novel maps the interrelations between literary production and public debates about citizenship that shaped twentieth-century Britain.

Defining British Citizenship

Empire, Commonwealth and Modern Britain
Author: Rieko Karatani
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780714653365
Category: History
Page: 228
View: 6917

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Unlike many nations Britain had not developed a national citizenship by the 20th century. Instead belonging in Britain was merely a function of allegiance to the Crown. This lack of definition was seen as beneficial. This title explores the implications of such vagueness as a new millennium begins.

Revolting Subjects

Social Abjection and Resistance in Neoliberal Britain
Author: Doctor Imogen Tyler
Publisher: Zed Books Ltd.
ISBN: 1848138547
Category: Social Science
Page: 264
View: 1302

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Revolting Subjects is a groundbreaking account of social abjection in contemporary Britain, exploring how particular groups of people are figured as revolting and how they in turn revolt against their abject subjectification. The book utilizes a number of high-profile and in-depth case studies - including 'chavs', asylum seekers, Gypsies and Travellers, and the 2011 London riots - to examine the ways in which individuals negotiate restrictive neoliberal ideologies of selfhood. In doing so, Tyler argues for a deeper psychosocial understanding of the role of representational forms in producing marginality, social exclusion and injustice, whilst also detailing how stigmatization and scapegoating are resisted through a variety of aesthetic and political strategies. Imaginative and original, Revolting Subjects introduces a range of new insights into neoliberal societies, and will be essential reading for those concerned about widening inequalities, growing social unrest and social justice in the wider global context.