Cicero on the Ideal Orator (De Oratore)


Author: Marcus Tullius Cicero
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195091984
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 374
View: 9096

Continue Reading →

In On the Ideal Orator, (De oratore), Cicero, the greatest Roman orator and prosewriter of his day, gives his mature views on rhetoric, oratory, and philosophy. Cast in the lively, literary form of a dialogue, this classic work presents a daring view of the orator as the master of all language communication while still emphasizing his role at the heart of Roman society and politics. Cicero's conception of the ideal orator represents his own original synthesis of the positions of the philosophers and the rhetoricians in the age-old quarrel between these disciplines. The first translation of De oratore in over fifty years, this volume is ideal for courses on Cicero and on the history of rhetoric/oratory. James May and Jakob Wisse provide an accurate and accessible translation which is based on--and contributes to--recent advances in our understanding of De oratore and of the many aspects of ancient rhetoric, philosophy, and history relevant to it. Their translation reflects the many variations of Cicero's style, which are essential ingredients of the work. The volume includes extensive annotation, based on current scholarship and offering significant original contributions as well. It is also enhanced by a full introduction covering all important aspects of both the work and its historical background; appendices on Cicero's works, figures of thought and speech, and alternate manuscript readings; a glossary of terms from rhetoric and Roman life and politics; and a comprehensive index of names and places.

Cicero: De Oratore


Author: Marcus Tullius Cicero,David Mankin
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521593603
Category: History
Page: 346
View: 2089

Continue Reading →

The first English commentary on De Oratore in more than a century, examining Book III in depth. This important and influential text deals with the relationship between oratorical style and content, with Cicero expressing his views on the training and qualification of the ideal orator-statesman.

The Roman World of Cicero's De Oratore


Author: Elaine Fantham
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780199207732
Category: History
Page: 354
View: 8579

Continue Reading →

The author offers a wide introduction to Cicero's political and cultural world, and illustrates, by analysis of his imaginary dialogue between statesmen, how he introduced the principles of Greek philosophy and rhetoric into Roman education so that his work became the basis of humanist ideals in the Renaissance and Enlightenment.

Making a New Man

Ciceronian Self-fashioning in the Rhetorical Works
Author: John Richard Dugan
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780199267804
Category: Foreign Language Study
Page: 388
View: 4319

Continue Reading →

Eschewing conventional Roman notions of manliness, Cicero constructs a distinctly aestheticized identity that flirts with the questionable domains of the theatre and the feminine, and thus fashions himself as a 'new man'."--Jacket.

Vom Redner (Vollständige deutsche Ausgabe)

De oratore: Rhetorisches Hauptwerk der Antike
Author: Marcus Tullius Cicero
Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand
ISBN: 8026861779
Category: Philosophy
Page: 212
View: 3741

Continue Reading →

Vom Redner ist ein grundlegendes Werk der rhetorischen Schriften Marcus Tullius Ciceros, in dem die Voraussetzungen des Rednerberufs, das Wesen der Rhetorik, der Aufbau der Rede, Fragen des Stils und der moralischen und philosophischen Pflichten des Redners erörtert werden. Die Schrift ist in der Form eines fiktiven Dialogs zwischen Lucius Licinius Crassus und Marcus Antonius Orator, Ciceros Lehrern und Vorbildern aufgebaut und datiert auf das Jahr 91 v. Chr., kurz vor Crassus Tod zurück. Cicero hat sie 55 v. Chr. veröffentlicht und seinem Bruder Quintus gewidmet. Sie gilt als ein Meisterwerk Ciceros über das Wesen des Rednerberufs. Das Werk teilt sich in drei Bücher auf: Im ersten Buch bespricht Crassus die Voraussetzungen für den Rednerberuf und gelangt von dort zu einer Darstellung des idealen Redners. Das zweite und dritte Buch beinhalten eine Darstellung der Teile der Redekunst, bevor am Ende in einem Exkurs neben den zuvor besprochenen technischen vor allem moralische und philosophische Qualitäten vom Redner verlangt werden: Er soll Rhetorik und Philosophie beherrschen, nicht nur eine dieser beiden Disziplinen. Cicero (106 v. Chr.- 43 v. Chr.) war ein römischer Politiker, Anwalt, Schriftsteller und Philosoph, der berühmteste Redner Roms und Konsul im Jahr 63 v. Chr. Cicero war einer der vielseitigsten, aber auch wankelmütigsten Köpfe der römischen Antike. Als Schriftsteller war er schon für die Antike stilistisches Vorbild, seine Werke wurden als Muster einer vollendeten, "goldenen" Latinität nachgeahmt.

Cicero's Ideal Statesman in Theory and Practice


Author: Jonathan Zarecki
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 178093470X
Category: History
Page: 208
View: 4513

Continue Reading →

The resurgence of interest in Cicero's political philosophy in the last twenty years demands a re-evaluation of Cicero's ideal statesman and its relationship not only to Cicero's political theory but also to his practical politics. Jonathan Zarecki proposes three original arguments: firstly, that by the publication of his De Republica in 51 BC Cicero accepted that some sort of return to monarchy was inevitable. Secondly, that Cicero created his model of the ideal statesman as part of an attempt to reconcile the mixed constitution of Rome's past with his belief in the inevitable return of sole-person rule. Thirdly, that the ideal statesman was the primary construct against which Cicero viewed the political and military activities of Pompey, Caesar and Antony, and himself.

The Oxford Handbook of William Wordsworth


Author: Richard Gravil,Daniel Robinson
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191019658
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 650
View: 4334

Continue Reading →

The Oxford Handbook of William Wordsworth deploys its forty-eight original essays, by an international team of scholar-critics, to present a stimulating account of Wordsworth's life and achievement and to map new directions in criticism. Nineteen essays explore the highlights of a long career systematically, giving special prominence to the lyric Wordsworth of Lyrical Ballads and the Poems in Two Volumes and to the blank verse poet of 'The Recluse'. Most of the other essays return to the poetry while exploring other dimensions of the life and work of the major Romantic poet. The result is a dialogic exploration of many major texts and problems in Wordsworth scholarship. This uniquely comprehensive handbook is structured so as to present, in turn, Wordsworth's life, career, and networks; aspects of the major lyrical and narrative poetry; components of 'The Recluse'; his poetical inheritance and his transformation of poetics; the variety of intellectual influences upon his work, from classical republican thought to modern science; his shaping of modern culture in such fields as gender, landscape, psychology, ethics, politics, religion and ecology; and his 19th- and 20th-century reception-most importantly by poets, but also in modern criticism and scholarship.

Greek and Roman Aesthetics


Author: Oleg V. Bychkov,Anne Sheppard
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 052154792X
Category: History
Page: 249
View: 3849

Continue Reading →

An anthology of works commenting on the perception of beauty in art, structure and style in literature, and aesthetic judgement.

The Great Beginning of Citeaux

A Narrative of the Beginning of the Cistercian Order
Author: E. Rozanne Elder
Publisher: Liturgical Press
ISBN: 0879077824
Category: Religion
Page: 664
View: 808

Continue Reading →

In the closing decades of the twelfth century, the Cistercian Order had become an important ecclesiastical and economic power in Europe. Yet it had lost its influential spokesman, Bernard of Clairvaux, and as the century drew to a close, religious sensibilities were changing. The new mendicant orders, the Franciscans and the Dominicans, and the impulses they embodied were to shift the center of gravity in Christian religious life for centuries to come. It was in this transitional period that Conrad of Eberbach gradually—between the 1180s and 1215—compiled the Exordium magnum cisterciense: The Great Beginning of Cîteaux. It is a book of history and lore, often with miraculous stories, meant to continue a great spiritual tradition, and it is also a book meant to justify and repair the Order. The Exordium magnum was in part an effort to provide a historical and formative context for those who were to be Cistercians in the thirteenth century. Conrad's combination of a historical sensibility and the edifying exempla makes the Exordium magnum a remarkably innovative book. Its unique combination of genres—narratio and exempla—is conceivable only within the intellectual world of the twelfth or early thirteenth centuries, before exempla collections came to be complied solely for edification or use in sermons. The Great Beginning of Cîteaux is a revealing book and an excellent place to begin more detailed study of the Cistercian Order between 1174 and the middle of the thirteenth century.

M. T. Cicero de Oratore

Or, His Three Diaglogues Upon the Character and Qualifications of an Orator
Author: Marcus Tullius Cicero
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Oratory
Page: 296
View: 7210

Continue Reading →

Poetics of Conduct

Oral Narrative and Moral Being in a South Indian Town
Author: Leela Prasad
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231511272
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 4591

Continue Reading →

Leela Prasad's riveting book presents everyday stories on subjects such as deities, ascetics, cats, and cooking along with stylized, publicly delivered ethical discourse, and shows that the study of oral narrative and performance is essential to ethical inquiry. Prasad builds on more than a decade of her ethnographic research in the famous Hindu pilgrimage town of Sringeri, Karnataka, in southwestern India, where for centuries a vibrant local culture has flourished alongside a tradition of monastic authority. Oral narratives and the seeing-and-doing orientations that are part of everyday life compel the question: How do individuals imagine the normative, and negotiate and express it, when normative sources are many and diverging? Moral persuasiveness, Prasad suggests, is intimately tied to the aesthetics of narration, and imagination plays a vital role in shaping how people create, refute, or relate to "text," "moral authority," and "community." Lived understandings of ethics keep notions of text and practice in flux and raise questions about the constitution of "theory" itself. Prasad's innovative use of ethnography, poetics, philosophy of language, and narrative and performance studies demonstrates how the moral self, with a capacity for artistic expression, is dynamic and gendered, with a historical presence and a political agency.

The Birth of Rhetoric

Gorgias, Plato and their Successors
Author: Robert Wardy
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134757298
Category: Philosophy
Page: 208
View: 1990

Continue Reading →

What is rhetoric? Is it the capacity to persuade? Or is it 'mere' rhetoric: the ability to get others to do what the speaker wants, regardless of what they want? This is the rhetoric of ideological manipulation and political seduction. Rhetoric is for some a distinctive mode of communication; for others, whenever someone speaks, rhetoric is present. This book is devoted to helping readers understand these rival accounts, by showing how it has happened that there are so many conceptions of rhetoric. Any such approach must be rooted in classical antiquity, since our ideas of rhetoric are the product of a complicated historical process starting in ancient Greece. Greek rhetoric was born in bitter controversy. The figure of Gorgias is at the centre of that debate and of this book: he invites us to confront the terrifying, exhilarating possibility that persuasion is just power.

Rhetoric in the European Tradition


Author: Thomas Conley
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226114897
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 325
View: 6902

Continue Reading →

Rhetoric in the European Tradition provides a comprehensive, chronological survey of the basic models of rhetoric as they developed from the early Greeks through the twentieth century. Discussing rhetorical theories and practices in the context of the times of political and intellectual crisis that gave rise to them, Thomas M. Conley chooses carefully from a vast pool of rhetorical literature to give voice to those authors who exercised the greatest influence in their own and succeeding generations. This book is valuable as both an introduction for students and a reference and resource for scholars in fields including literature, cultural history, philosophy, and speech and communication studies.

De oratore libri III.

Bd. 2
Author: Anton D. Leeman,Harm Pinkster,Hein L. W. Nelson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9783533035176
Category: Oratory, Ancient
Page: 309
View: 3054

Continue Reading →

The Three Dialogues of M. T. Cicero on the Orator


Author: Cicero
Publisher: Kessinger Publishing
ISBN: 9781417938223
Category: Philosophy
Page: 352
View: 1942

Continue Reading →

1857. The Rhetorical works of Cicero include his Orator, which is addressed to his friend Brutus, and is a labored defense of his favorite notion that a perfect orator needs to possess an almost universal knowledge; Topica, or a compend of Aristotle's Topics; Oratoriae Partitiones, in which the proper arrangement of the parts of speech is discussed; Brutus, in which he gives a brief account of the most eminent orators of Greece and Rome; and the De Oratore of which this volume is a translation. This latter work was regarded by the friends of Cicero as his most finished production. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

Absolute Music

The History of an Idea
Author: Mark Evan Bonds
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019938472X
Category: Music
Page: 400
View: 9867

Continue Reading →

What is music, and why does it move us? From Pythagoras to the present, writers have struggled to isolate the essence of "pure" or "absolute" music in ways that also account for its profound effect. In Absolute Music: The History of an Idea, Mark Evan Bonds traces the history of these efforts across more than two millennia, paying special attention to the relationship between music's essence and its qualities of form, expression, beauty, autonomy, as well as its perceived capacity to disclose philosophical truths. The core of this book focuses on the period between 1850 and 1945. Although the idea of pure music is as old as antiquity, the term "absolute music" is itself relatively recent. It was Richard Wagner who coined the term, in 1846, and he used it as a pejorative in his efforts to expose the limitations of purely instrumental music. For Wagner, music that was "absolute" was isolated, detached from the world, sterile. His contemporary, the Viennese critic Eduard Hanslick, embraced this quality of isolation as a guarantor of purity. Only pure, absolute music, he argued, could realize the highest potential of the art. Bonds reveals how and why perceptions of absolute music changed so radically between the 1850s and 1920s. When it first appeared, "absolute music" was a new term applied to old music, but by the early decades of the twentieth century, it had become-paradoxically--an old term associated with the new music of modernists like Schoenberg and Stravinsky. Bonds argues that the key developments in this shift lay not in discourse about music but rather the visual arts. The growing prestige of abstraction and form in painting at the turn of the twentieth century-line and color, as opposed to object-helped move the idea of purely abstract, absolute music to the cutting edge of musical modernism. By carefully tracing the evolution of absolute music from Ancient Greece through the Middle Ages to the twentieth-century, Bonds not only provides the first comprehensive history of this pivotal concept but also provokes new thoughts on the essence of music and how essence has been used to explain music's effect. A long awaited book from one of the most respected senior scholars in the field, Absolute Music will be essential reading for anyone interested in the history, theory, and aesthetics of music.

Encyclopedia of Educational Theory and Philosophy


Author: D. C. Phillips
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1483364755
Category: Education
Page: 952
View: 6994

Continue Reading →

Education is a field sometimes beset by theories-of-the-day and with easy panaceas that overpromise the degree to which they can alleviate pressing educational problems. The two-volume Encyclopedia of Educational Theory and Philosophy introduces readers to theories that have stood the test of time and those that have provided the historical foundation for the best of contemporary educational theory and practice. Drawing together a team of international scholars, this invaluable reference examines the global landscape of all the key theories and the theorists behind them and presents them in the context needed to understand their strengths and weaknesses. In addition to interpretations of long-established theories, this work offers essays on cutting-edge research and concise, to-the-point definitions of key concepts, ideas, schools, and figures. Features: Over 300 signed entries by trusted experts in the field are organized into two volumes and overseen by a distinguished General Editor and an international Editorial Board. Entries are followed by cross references and further reading suggestions. A Chronology of Theory within the field of education highlights developments over the centuries; a Reader’s Guide groups entries thematically, and a master Bibliography facilitates further study. The Reader’s Guide, detailed index, and cross references combine for strong search-and-browse capabilities in the electronic version. Available in a choice of print or electronic formats, Encyclopedia of Educational Theory and Philosophy is an ideal reference for anyone interested in the roots of contemporary educational theory.

Rediscovering Rhetoric

Law, Language, and the Practice of Persuasion
Author: Justin T. Gleeson,Ruth C. A. Higgins
Publisher: Federation Press
ISBN: 9781862877054
Category: English language
Page: 295
View: 3497

Continue Reading →

Rhetoric is ubiquitous in modern discourse: from arguments delivered in the High Court, to advertisements disseminated in the high street. For the legal and political advocate, persuasion is also a professional technique that must be perfected properly to practise each art. In contrast with the classical era and the middle ages, in which grammar, rhetoric and dialectic were basic features of all education, modern curricula almost entirely neglect any theoretical study of the methods of rhetoric. Rediscovering Rhetoric re-introduces to modern practitioners and students a grasp of the speeches, writings and methodologies of the great classical scholars of rhetoric. Part 1 - Law and Language in the Greco-Roman Tradition provides a contextualised introduction to significant theorists of rhetoric in the classical period, and consists of four chapters written by practising barristers and a current Justice of the Federal Court of Australia. Part 2 - The Practice of Persuasion comprises essays by practitioners distinguished in their pursuit of legal persuasion - one former and two current Justices of the High Court of Australia - illuminating their experiences of argument from the perspective of both bench and bar. Part 3 - The Politics of Persuasion performs a similar function to Part 2, in the related domain of politics. It includes a chapter by Graham Freudenberg, former speechwriter for Gough Whitlam and others. Together the three parts provide a unique inter-disciplinary perspective on the theory and practice of legal and political persuasion. Published in association with the NSW Bar Association.