The Chinchaga Firestorm

When the Moon and Sun Turned Blue
Author: Cordy Tymstra
Publisher: University of Alberta
ISBN: 1772120030
Category: Nature
Page: 227
View: 753

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How the biggest forest fire in North American history affected and changed forest fire management.

Firestorm

How Wildfire Will Shape Our Future
Author: Edward Struzik
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 1610918185
Category: Nature
Page: 257
View: 9875

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"In the spring of 2016, the world watched as wildfire ravaged the Canadian town of Fort McMurray. Firefighters named the fire "the Beast" because it behaved in seemingly sinister and often unpredictable ways. Many of them hoped that they would never see anything like it again. Yet it's not a stretch to suggest that megafires like the Beast have become the new normal. A glance at international headlines shows a remarkable increase in higher temperatures, stronger winds, and drier lands- a trifecta for igniting wildfires like we have rarely seen before. Fires are burning bigger, hotter, faster, and more often. In Firestorm, journalist Edward Struzik confronts this new reality, offering a deftly woven tale of science, economics, politics, and human determination. To understand how we might yet flourish in the coming age of megafires, Struzik visits scorched earth from Alaska to Maine, and introduces the scientists, firefighters, and resource managers making the case for a radically different approach to managing wildfire in the twenty-first century. We must begin by acknowledging that fire is unavoidable, and be much more prepared to cope when we cannot completely control the flames.Living with fire also means, Struzik reveals, that we must better understand how the surprising, far-reaching impacts of these massive fires will linger long after the smoke eventually clears."--Jacket flap.

For King and Kanata

Canadian Indians and the First World War
Author: Timothy Charles Winegard
Publisher: Univ. of Manitoba Press
ISBN: 0887554180
Category: History
Page: 224
View: 8337

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"The first comprehensive history of the Aboriginal First World War experience on the battlefield and the home front. When the call to arms was heard at the outbreak of the First World War, Canada's First Nations pledged their men and money to the Crown to honour their long-standing tradition of forming military alliances with Europeans during times of war, and as a means of resisting cultural assimilation and attaining equality through shared service and sacrifice. Initially, the Canadian government rejected these offers based on the belief that status Indians were unsuited to modern, civilized warfare. But in 1915, Britain intervened and demanded Canada actively recruit Indian soldiers to meet the incessant need for manpower. Thus began the complicated relationships between the Imperial Colonial and War Offices, the Department of Indian Affairs, and the Ministry of Militia that would affect every aspect of the war experience for Canada's Aboriginal soldiers. In his groundbreaking new book, For King and Kanata, Timothy C. Winegard reveals how national and international forces directly influenced the more than 4,000 status Indians who voluntarily served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force between 1914 and 1919--a per capita percentage equal to that of Euro-Canadians--and how subsequent administrative policies profoundly affected their experiences at home, on the battlefield, and as returning veterans."--Publisher's website.

A Rock Fell on the Moon

Dad and the Great Yukon Silver Ore Heist
Author: Alicia Priest
Publisher: Harbour Publishing
ISBN: 1550176730
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 7948

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In its heyday in the 1950s and ’60s, the remote community of Elsa, 300 miles north of Whitehorse in the Yukon Territory, was the epicentre of one of the world’s most lucrative silver mining operations—an enterprise that far surpassed the riches produced during the iconic Klondike gold rush. For twelve of those years, Gerald Priest was the chief assayer for United Keno Hill Mines (UKHM), the major player in the region. Priest was a clever man who could as easily carry the role of refined gentleman as he could rustic mountain man. As far as ten-year-old Alicia Priest was concerned, her father Gerry’s life in Elsa was perfect: a home rich with music, books and pets where he never had to boil a kettle or wash a sock; a well paying job; a beautiful and affectionate wife; and two daughters who revered him as only little girls can. But as Alicia grows older, she realizes that perhaps her dad saw things differently, with four female dependents, an ailing wife who couldn’t give him the son he wanted, a religiously fanatical mother-in-law and a tedious, dead-end job. Escape becomes possible when Gerry stakes the Moon Claims and discovers a phenomenal silver-rich boulder—enough silver to make him and his family rich and fund their relocation south. But when Gerry tries to smelt and sell the ore, UKHM calls the RCMP. Too many things don’t add up: geologists find the former assayer’s boulder story improbable, the manpower required to hand-mine and transport seventy tons of rock across the Yukon terrain is beyond Herculean and most suspiciously, Gerry’s ore looks a lot like the ore found in UKHM’s Elsa mine. In A Rock Fell on the Moon, Alicia Priest consults letters, news stories, archived RCMP files and court documents, and interviews with former mine employees, litigators and police investigators, to piece together the full story of her father’s infamous heist. The result is a lively, heartrending account of a mysterious crime that came extraordinarily close to succeeding; a fascinating look into the small mining communities that once thrived in the Yukon; and the personal story of the Priest family, who could only watch aghast as the life they knew crumbled around them. As she uncovers more of the story, Alicia must reconcile two different versions of her father: the fun-loving, bush-savvy adventurer who raised her, and the man accused and convicted of the Great Yukon Silver Ore Heist.

On Being Here to Stay

Treaties and Aboriginal Rights in Canada
Author: Michael Asch
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442669845
Category: Social Science
Page: 232
View: 4241

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What, other than numbers and power, justifies Canada’s assertion of sovereignty and jurisdiction over the country’s vast territory? Why should Canada’s original inhabitants have to ask for rights to what was their land when non-Aboriginal people first arrived? The question lurks behind every court judgment on Indigenous rights, every demand that treaty obligations be fulfilled, and every land-claims negotiation. Addressing these questions has occupied anthropologist Michael Asch for nearly thirty years. In On Being Here to Stay, Asch retells the story of Canada with a focus on the relationship between First Nations and settlers. Asch proposes a way forward based on respecting the “spirit and intent” of treaties negotiated at the time of Confederation, through which, he argues, First Nations and settlers can establish an ethical way for both communities to be here to stay.

Welcome to Resisterville

American Dissidents in British Columbia
Author: Kathleen Rodgers
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 077482736X
Category: Political Science
Page: 240
View: 9684

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Between 1965 and 1975, thousands of American migrants traded their established lives for a new beginning in the West Kootenay region of British Columbia. Some were non-violent resisters who opposed the war in Vietnam. But a larger group was inspired by the ideals of the 1960s counterculture and, hoping to flee the restrictive demands of their parents' world, they set out to build a peaceful, egalitarian society in the Canadian wilderness. Even today, their success is evident, as these impassioned ideals still define community life. Welcome to Resisterville is both a look at an untold chapter in Canadian history and a compelling story of enduring idealism.

Resurrecting Dr. Moss

The Life and Letters of a Royal Navy Surgeon, Edward Lawton Moss MD, RN, 1843-1880
Author: William Barr
Publisher: Michigan State University Press
ISBN: N.A
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 252
View: 4575

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Co-published by the Arctic Institute of North America.

Awful Splendour

A Fire History of Canada
Author: Stephen J. Pyne
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 0774840277
Category: Nature
Page: 584
View: 4962

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Fire is a defining element in Canadian land and life. With few exceptions, Canada's forests and prairies have evolved with fire. Its peoples have exploited fire and sought to protect themselves from its excesses, and since Confederation, the country has devised various institutions to connect fire and society. The choices Canadians have made says a great deal about their national character. Awful Splendour narrates the history of this grand saga. It will interest geographers, historians, and members of the fire community.

Unfree Labour?

Struggles of Migrant and Immigrant Workers in Canada
Author: Aziz Choudry,Adrian Smith
Publisher: PM Press
ISBN: 1629632589
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 2879

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Over the past decade, Canada has experienced considerable growth in labour migration. Moreover, temporary labour migration has replaced permanent immigration as the primary means by which people enter Canada. Utilizing the rhetoric of maintaining competitiveness, Canadian employers and the state have ushered in an era of neoliberal migration alongside an agenda of austerity flowing from capitalist crisis. Labour markets have been restructured to render labour more flexible and precarious, and in Canada as in other high-income capitalist labour markets, employers are relying on migrant and immigrant workers as "unfree labour." This book explores labour migration to Canada and how public policies of temporary and guest worker programs function in the global context of work and capitalist restructuring. Contributors are directly engaged with the issues emerging from the influx of temporary foreign workers and Canada's "creeping economic apartheid."

Letters to My Grandchildren


Author: David Suzuki
Publisher: Greystone Books
ISBN: 1771640898
Category: Nature
Page: 176
View: 6743

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In this inspiring series of letters to his grandchildren, David Suzuki offers grandfatherly advice mixed with stories from his own remarkable life and explores what makes life meaningful. He challenges his grandchildren — and us — to do everything at full tilt. He explains why sports, fishing, feminism, and failure are important; why it is dangerous to deny our biological nature; and why First Nations must lead a revolution. Drawing on his own experiences and the wisdom he has gained over his long life, he decries the lack of elders and grandparents in the lives of many people, especially immigrants, and champions the importance of heroes. And he even has something to say about fashion. The book also provides an intimate look at Suzuki’s life as a father and grandfather with letters that are chock-full of anecdotes about his children and grandchildren when they were small. As he ponders life’s deepest questions and offers up a lifetime of wisdom, Suzuki inspires us all to live with courage, conviction, and passion.

Secwépemc People, Land, and Laws

Yerí7 re Stsq'ey's-kucw
Author: Marianne Ignace,Ronald E. Ignace
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN: 0773552030
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
View: 8753

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Secwépemc People, Land, and Laws is a journey through the 10,000-year history of the Interior Plateau nation in British Columbia. Told through the lens of past and present Indigenous storytellers, this volume detail how a homeland has shaped Secwépemc existence while the Secwépemc have in turn shaped their homeland. Marianne Ignace and Ronald Ignace, with contributions from ethnobotanist Nancy Turner, archaeologist Mike Rousseau, and geographer Ken Favrholdt, compellingly weave together Secwépemc narratives about ancestors’ deeds. They demonstrate how these stories are the manifestation of Indigenous laws (stsq'ey') for social and moral conduct among humans and all sentient beings on the land, and for social and political relations within the nation and with outsiders. Breathing new life into stories about past transformations, the authors place these narratives in dialogue with written historical sources and knowledge from archaeology, ethnography, linguistics, earth science, and ethnobiology. In addition to a wealth of detail about Secwépemc land stewardship, the social and political order, and spiritual concepts and relations embedded in the Indigenous language, the book shows how between the mid-1800s and 1920s the Secwépemc people resisted devastating oppression and the theft of their land, and fought to retain political autonomy while tenaciously maintaining a connection with their homeland, ancestors, and laws. An exemplary work in collaboration, Secwépemc People, Land, and Laws points to the ways in which Indigenous laws and traditions can guide present and future social and political process among the Secwépemc and with settler society.

Tragedy at Second Narrows

The Story of the Ironworkers Memorial Bridge
Author: Eric Jamieson
Publisher: Harbour Publishing Company
ISBN: 9781550175301
Category: History
Page: 301
View: 6540

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A timely, detailed reconstruction of one of Vancouver's worst industrial accidents.

Creating Space

My Life and Work in Indigenous Education
Author: Verna J. Kirkness
Publisher: Univ. of Manitoba Press
ISBN: 0887554458
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 353

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Verna J. Kirkness grew up on the Fisher River Indian reserve in Manitoba. Her childhood dream to be a teacher set her on a lifelong journey in education as a teacher, counsellor, consultant, and professor. Her simple quest to teach "in a Native way" revolutionized Canadian education policy and practice. Kirkness broke new ground at every turn. As the first cross-cultural consultant for the Manitoba Department of Education Curriculum Branch she made Cree and Ojibway the languages of instruction in several Manitoba schools. In the early 1970s she became the first Education Director for the Manitoba Indian Brotherhood (now the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs) and then Education Director for the National Indian Brotherhood (now the Assembly of First Nations). She played a pivotal role in developing the education sections of Wahbung: Our Tomorrows, which transformed Manitoba education, and the landmark 1972 national policy of Indian Control of Indian Education. These two major works have shaped First Nations education in Canada for more than 40 years. In the 1980s she became an assistant professor at the University of British Columbia where she was appointed Director of the Native Teacher Education Program, founded the Ts’‘Kel Graduate Program, and was a driving force behind the creation of the First Nations House of Learning. Honoured by community and country, Kirkness is a visionary who has inspired, and been inspired by, generations of students. Like a long conversation between friends, Creating Space reveals the challenges and misgivings, the burning questions, the successes and failures that have shaped the life of this extraordinary woman and the history of Aboriginal education in Canada.

Mixed Blessings

Indigenous Encounters with Christianity in Canada
Author: Tolly Bradford,Chelsea Horton
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 0774829427
Category: Religion
Page: 208
View: 2126

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Mixed Blessings transforms our understanding of the relationship between Indigenous people and Christianity in Canada from the early 1600s to the present day. While acknowledging the harm of colonialism, including the trauma inflicted by church-run residential schools, this interdisciplinary collection challenges the portrayal of Indigenous people as passive victims of malevolent missionaries who experienced a uniformly dark history. Instead, this book illuminates the diverse and multifaceted ways that Indigenous communities and individuals – including prominent leaders such as Louis Riel and Edward Ahenakew – have interacted, and continue to interact, meaningfully with Christianity.

The Real Thing

The Natural History of Ian McTaggart Cowan
Author: Briony Penn
Publisher: Rocky Mountain Books Ltd
ISBN: 1771600705
Category: Nature
Page: N.A
View: 8685

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Gunflint Burning

Fire in the Boundary Waters
Author: Cary J. Griffith
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781517903411
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 1660

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The story of the Ham Lake fire, at the time the most destructive wildfire in modern Minnesota history--the blaze, the firefighters' battle, the human toll On May 5, 2007, two days into his twenty-seventh trip to the Boundary Waters, Stephen Posniak found a perfect spot on Ham Lake and set about making a campfire. Over the next two weeks, the fire he set would consume 75,000 acres of forest and 144 buildings. More than one thousand firefighters would rally to extinguish the blaze, at a cost of 11 million dollars. Gunflint Burning is a comprehensive account of the dramatic events around the Ham Lake fire, one of the largest wildfires in Minnesota history. Cary J. Griffith describes what happened in the minutes, hours, and days after Posniak struck that fateful match--from the first hint of danger to the ensuing race to flee the fire or defend imperiled property to the incredible efforts of firefighters and residents battling a blaze that lit up the Gunflint Trail like the fuse to a powder keg. We meet locals faced with losing everything: the sheriff and his deputy tasked with getting everyone out alive; tourists caught unawares; men and women using every piece of equipment and modern firefighting technique against impossibly high winds and dry conditions to suppress a wildfire as it grew to historic proportions; and, finally, Stephen Posniak, who in the aftermath tragically took his own life--the fire's only fatality. In sharp detail, Gunflint Burning describes the key events of the Ham Lake fire as they unfold, providing readers with a sense of being on the front lines of an epic struggle that was at times heroic, tragic, and sublime.

Spilsbury's Coast

Pioneer Years in the Wet West
Author: Howard White,Jim Spilsbury
Publisher: Madeira Park, B.C. : Harbour Publishing Company
ISBN: 9781550170467
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 196
View: 7200

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Spilsbury's Coast is that part of the Inside Passage between the Fraser River and the top end of Vancouver Island -- a place of small boats, countless islands and whole towns on floats.

Ms Marmite Lover's Secret Tea Party


Author: Kerstin Rodgers
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1448190746
Category: Cooking
Page: 256
View: 8779

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A decadent guide to the ultimate afternoon teas from Ms Marmite Lover, winner of the 2014 Fortnum & Mason Best Online Food Writer Award There is no more pleasurable way to while away a few hours than by indulging in a delectable afternoon tea. In this book, queen of the tea party, Kerstin Rodgers, reveals her secrets – from dressing the table, to baking scrumptious sweet and savoury treats. As well as recipes for classic tea party fare – Scones, Teacakes, Tartlets, Cupcakes, Crumpets, Biscuits, Muffins and more – the book looks beyond finger sandwiches with playful and sophisticated themed teas. Spoil your guests with a decadent Marie Antoinette-inspired party, complete with delicate French Fancies and an impressive Croquembouche Tower, or transport them to the mystical East with Bubble Tea, fragrant Lavender Temari Cakes and personalised Fortune Cookies. Packed with recipes for tea party treats, hot and cold drinks and cocktails, as well as tips for creating the right atmosphere, this gorgeous collection is a must-have for any aspiring host looking to create deliciously decadent tea parties at home.

Indigenous Men and Masculinities

Legacies, Identities, Regeneration
Author: Robert Alexander Innes,Kim Anderson
Publisher: Univ. of Manitoba Press
ISBN: 0887554776
Category: Social Science
Page: 328
View: 1361

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What do we know of masculinities in non-patriarchal societies? Indigenous peoples of the Americas and beyond come from traditions of gender equity, complementarity, and the sacred feminine, concepts that were unimaginable and shocking to Euro-western peoples at contact. "Indigenous Men and Masculinities", edited by Kim Anderson and Robert Alexander Innes, brings together prominent thinkers to explore the meaning of masculinities and being a man within such traditions, further examining the colonial disruption and imposition of patriarchy on Indigenous men. Building on Indigenous knowledge systems, Indigenous feminism, and queer theory, the sixteen essays by scholars and activists from Canada, the U.S., and New Zealand open pathways for the nascent field of Indigenous masculinities. The authors explore subjects of representation through art and literature, as well as Indigenous masculinities in sport, prisons, and gangs. "Indigenous Men and Masculinities" highlights voices of Indigenous male writers, traditional knowledge keepers, ex-gang members, war veterans, fathers, youth, two-spirited people, and Indigenous men working to end violence against women. It offers a refreshing vision toward equitable societies that celebrate healthy and diverse masculinities.