Cheating Welfare

Public Assistance and the Criminalization of Poverty
Author: Kaaryn S. Gustafson
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814760791
Category: Law
Page: 227
View: 5490

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Discusses the history and prevalence of welfare fraud using interviews and case studies.

Cheating Welfare

Public Assistance and the Criminalization of Poverty
Author: Kaaryn S. Gustafson
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814732917
Category: Law
Page: 238
View: 9976

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Over the last three decades, welfare policies have been informed by popular beliefs that welfare fraud is rampant. As a result, welfare policies have become more punitive and the boundaries between the welfare system and the criminal justice system have blurred—so much so that in some locales prosecution caseloads for welfare fraud exceed welfare caseloads. In reality, some recipients manipulate the welfare system for their own ends, others are gravely hurt by punitive policies, and still others fall somewhere in between. In Cheating Welfare, Kaaryn S. Gustafson endeavors to clear up these gray areas by providing insights into the history, social construction, and lived experience of welfare. She shows why cheating is all but inevitable—not because poor people are immoral, but because ordinary individuals navigating complex systems of rules are likely to become entangled despite their best efforts. Through an examination of the construction of the crime we know as welfare fraud, which she bases on in-depth interviews with welfare recipients in Northern California, Gustafson challenges readers to question their assumptions about welfare policies, welfare recipients, and crime control in the United States.

Cheating Welfare

Public Assistance and the Criminalization of Poverty
Author: Kaaryn S. Gustafson
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814733395
Category: LAW
Page: 240
View: 6937

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Over the last three decades, welfare policies have been informed by popular beliefs that welfare fraud is rampant. As a result, welfare policies have become more punitive and the boundaries between the welfare system and the criminal justice system have blurredOCoso much so that in some locales prosecution caseloads for welfare fraud exceed welfare caseloads. In reality, some recipients manipulate the welfare system for their own ends, others are gravely hurt by punitive policies, and still others fall somewhere in between. In Cheating Welfare, Kaaryn S. Gustafson endeavors to clear up these gray areas by providing insights into the history, social construction, and lived experience of welfare. She shows why cheating is all but inevitableOConot because poor people are immoral, but because ordinary individuals navigating complex systems of rules are likely to become entangled despite their best efforts. Through an examination of the construction of the crime we know as welfare fraud, which she bases on in-depth interviews with welfare recipients in Northern California, Gustafson challenges readers to question their assumptions about welfare policies, welfare recipients, and crime control in the United States.

The Pig Farmer's Daughter and Other Tales of American Justice

Episodes of Racism and Sexism in the Courts from 1865 to the Present
Author: Mary Frances Berry
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307797295
Category: Law
Page: 304
View: 5005

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From the head of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission and noted professor of law and history at the University of Pennsylvania, a groundbreaking book that examines both civil and criminal court cases from the Civil War to the present, to reveal the impact of stereotyping--race, class, gender--on the American legal system. The question Mary Frances Berry asks: Whose story most strongly influences the making of legal decisions in the American justice system? Using previously unexamined material from state appellate civil and criminal court cases--cases of rape, seduction, and paternity disputes, and cases dealing with murder, inheritance, and property disputes in which sexual relations are at the heart of the story--Berry takes us through two centuries of American case law to show how attitudes toward gender, race, class, and sexuality have materially affected, and continue to affect, judicial decision-making. Among the many cases Berry discusses: Alabama, 1867--A white woman sues her husband for divorce in both the lower and state supreme courts because of his sexual relationship with a former slave, and is denied her petition on the basis that a sexual relationship between a white man and a black woman is "of no consequence." New York, 1932--In a surprising victory, the longtime mistress of a theater owner successfully contests her lover's will and proves her right to inherit a wife's portion of the estate. Texas, 1984--A suit by a woman against her female lover ends in a decision that allows the court to avoid acknowledging the existence of a lesbian relationship. And, in the 1990s, we see the cases of William Kennedy Smith, Mike Tyson, and O. J. Simpson in a new context. Moving stories, shocking stories, ironic stories, tragic stories--a book that fascinates in terms of its human drama, by its demonstration of the ways in which prejudice affects justice, and by its account of how the law has evolved (or hasn't) as our racial, social, and sexual attitudes have changed. From the Hardcover edition.

Poverty and Morality

Religious and Secular Perspectives
Author: William A. Galston,Peter H. Hoffenberg
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139491067
Category: Philosophy
Page: N.A
View: 8524

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This multi-authored book explores the ways that many influential ethical traditions - secular and religious, Western and non-Western - wrestle with the moral dimensions of poverty and the needs of the poor. These traditions include Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism, among the religious perspectives; classical liberalism, feminism, liberal-egalitarianism, and Marxism, among the secular; and natural law, which might be claimed by both. The basic questions addressed by each of these traditions are linked to several overarching themes: what poverty is, the particular vulnerabilities of high-risk groups, responsibility for the occurrence of poverty, preferred remedies, how responsibility for its alleviation is distributed, and priorities in the delivery of assistance. This volume features an introduction to the types, scope, and causes of poverty in the modern world and concludes with Michael Walzer's broadly conceived commentary, which provides a direct comparison of the presented views and makes suggestions for further study and policy.

Criminalizing Race, Criminalizing Poverty

Welfare Fraud Enforcement in Canada
Author: Kiran Mirchandani,Wendy Chan
Publisher: Brunswick Books
ISBN: N.A
Category: Political Science
Page: 102
View: 5847

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Arguing that people of color are most often the casualties in the governments' desire to roll back the welfare state, this analysis delves into the current myths and stereotypes about racial difference. In exploring such myths in conjunction with the enforcement of welfare fraud policies, this study shows how people of color are constructed as potential "cheaters" and "abusers" of the system, and how this has allowed for the stigmatizing and discriminatory treatment of certain races to persist unchallenged. With an analysis of the criminalization and penalization of poverty—including the increased surveillance and control of welfare recipients—this argument sheds new light on the perspectives of poverty advocates.

Crime as Structured Action

Gender, Race, Class, and Crime in the Making
Author: James Messerschmidt
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1506338801
Category: Social Science
Page: 144
View: 1951

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The author of this volume skillfully demonstrates that a vital component to understanding crime is to be able to view it as more than a single activity. James W. Messerschmidt argues that crime operates subtly through a complex series of gender, race and class practices and these interwoven elements must be seen as part of all social existence, not viewed independently.

Constructing Crime

Contemporary Processes of Criminalization
Author: Janet Mosher,Joan Brockman
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 0774859466
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 6442

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Constructing Crime examines why particular behaviours are defined and enforced as crimes and particular individuals are targeted as criminals. Contributors interrogate notions of crime, processes of criminalization, and the deployment of the concept of crime in five areas � the enforcement of fraud against welfare recipients and physicians, the enforcement of laws against Aboriginal harvesting practices, the perceptions of disorder in public housing projects, and the selective criminalization of gambling. These case studies and an afterword by Marie-Andr�e Bertrand challenge us to consider just who is rendered criminal and why.

Understanding Disorganized Attachment

Theory and Practice for Working with Children and Adults
Author: David Shemmings,Yvonne Shemmings
Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
ISBN: 1849050449
Category: Psychology
Page: 240
View: 5463

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Disorganized attachment, the most extreme form of insecure attachment, can develop in a child when the person who is meant to protect them becomes a source of danger. This book provides a comprehensive text on disorganized attachment.

Human Targets

Schools, Police, and the Criminalization of Latino Youth
Author: Victor M. Rios,James Diego Vigil
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022609099X
Category: Education
Page: 211
View: 543

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Victor Rios has a vibrant reputation as America s leading ethnographer of Latino youth. His personal storygoing from drug pusher (selling heroin on the streets as a teenager) to a hard worker at a mechanic shop within a matter of weeksshows how he stands in the place of the Latino youths he studies. His story underscores the degree to which delinquent urban youths can become adaptable, fluid, amenable individuals, able to shift their views of the world as well as their actions. Rios rejects the old storyline that said gangs are bad and they do bad things because they are bad people. Kids on the street, he argues, can drift between different identities, indeed, they can shift seamlessly between responsible and deviant displays within a few hours time. The key to understanding gang-associated youth lies in analysis of the way authority figures (teachers and police officers) interact with young people. The kids need caring adults who offer tangible resources. Story and characters are always front-and-center in Rios s narrative: Jorge, Mark, Wilson, and others, are boys we get to know as they negotiate day-to-day life on the streets and across institutional settings. We learn a great deal about Cholo subculture, the clothing and hairstyles, and the argot that are adopted by Latino youth in response to the forces that seek to marginalize or punish them. The crisis of a perceived epidemic of police brutality in our post-Ferguson era is a product of culture in Rios s view: contested symbols, negative interactions, and day-to-day encounters that freeze youth identities as gang-associated, and that freeze authority identities as negative shapers of youth attitudes and actions are the dynamic. Fear of young males of color leads to police misreading and dehumanizing of young black and Latino men. Rios raises our awareness of how this dynamic operates by studying his subjects whole: following young gang members into their schools, their homes, their community organizations, their detention facilities, and watching them interact with police, watching them grow up to become fathers, get jobs, get rap sheets. Get killed. This book will be a landmark contribution to the social psychology of poverty and crime."

After the Welfare State

Politicians Stole Your Future-- You Can Get it Back
Author: Tom G. Palmer
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Economic security
Page: 180
View: 6099

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Colour-Coded

A Legal History of Racism in Canada, 1900-1950
Author: Constance Backhouse
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442690852
Category: Social Science
Page: 432
View: 1178

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Historically Canadians have considered themselves to be more or less free of racial prejudice. Although this conception has been challenged in recent years, it has not been completely dispelled. In Colour-Coded, Constance Backhouse illustrates the tenacious hold that white supremacy had on our legal system in the first half of this century, and underscores the damaging legacy of inequality that continues today. Backhouse presents detailed narratives of six court cases, each giving evidence of blatant racism created and enforced through law. The cases focus on Aboriginal, Inuit, Chinese-Canadian, and African-Canadian individuals, taking us from the criminal prosecution of traditional Aboriginal dance to the trial of members of the 'Ku Klux Klan of Kanada.' From thousands of possibilities, Backhouse has selected studies that constitute central moments in the legal history of race in Canada. Her selection also considers a wide range of legal forums, including administrative rulings by municipal councils, criminal trials before police magistrates, and criminal and civil cases heard by the highest courts in the provinces and by the Supreme Court of Canada. The extensive and detailed documentation presented here leaves no doubt that the Canadian legal system played a dominant role in creating and preserving racial discrimination. A central message of this book is that racism is deeply embedded in Canadian history despite Canada's reputation as a raceless society. Winner of the Joseph Brant Award, presented by the Ontario Historical Society

Welfare Discipline

Discourse, Governance, and Globalization
Author: Sanford F. Schram,Sanford Schram
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 9781592137787
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 206
View: 4809

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Rethinking the American understanding of poverty, welfare, and the language used to describe them.

Folk Devils and Moral Panics


Author: Stanley Cohen
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1136807047
Category: Social Science
Page: 328
View: 1796

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'Richly documented and convincingly presented' -- New Society Mods and Rockers, skinheads, video nasties, designer drugs, bogus asylum seeks and hoodies. Every era has its own moral panics. It was Stanley Cohen’s classic account, first published in the early 1970s and regularly revised, that brought the term ‘moral panic’ into widespread discussion. It is an outstanding investigation of the way in which the media and often those in a position of political power define a condition, or group, as a threat to societal values and interests. Fanned by screaming media headlines, Cohen brilliantly demonstrates how this leads to such groups being marginalised and vilified in the popular imagination, inhibiting rational debate about solutions to the social problems such groups represent. Furthermore, he argues that moral panics go even further by identifying the very fault lines of power in society. Full of sharp insight and analysis, Folk Devils and Moral Panics is essential reading for anyone wanting to understand this powerful and enduring phenomenon. Professor Stanley Cohen is Emeritus Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics. He received the Sellin-Glueck Award of the American Society of Criminology (1985) and is on the Board of the International Council on Human Rights. He is a member of the British Academy.

A Philosophical Examination of Social Justice and Child Poverty


Author: G. Schweiger,G. Graf
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137426020
Category: Philosophy
Page: 193
View: 3341

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This book is open access under a CCBY license. This book investigates child poverty from a philosophical perspective. It identifies the injustices of child poverty, relates them to the well-being of children, and discusses who has a moral responsibility to secure social justice for children.

The Precariat

The New Dangerous Class
Author: Guy Standing
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1474294170
Category: Political Science
Page: 248
View: 6366

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First published in 2011 The Precariat is the hugely influential first account of an emerging class of people facing insecurity, moving in and out of precarious work that gives little meaning to their lives. Standing warns that the growth of the precariat is producing instabilities in society. Its internal divisions have led to the villainization of migrants and other vulnerable groups and some are susceptible to the dangers of political extremism. Standing argues for a new politics which puts the fears and aspirations of the precariat at the heart of a progressive strategy of redistribution and income security. The precariat is an increasingly global phenomenon, highly visible in the ongoing migrant crisis and protest movements around the world. In a new preface for the Revelations edition Guy Standing discusses recent political developments and their effect on the precariat.

Can't Catch a Break

Gender, Jail, Drugs, and the Limits of Personal Responsibility
Author: Susan Starr Sered,Maureen Norton-Hawk
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520282787
Category: Health & Fitness
Page: 216
View: 9714

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Based on five years of fieldwork in Boston, Can’t Catch a Break documents the day-to-day lives of forty women as they struggle to survive sexual abuse, violent communities, ineffective social and therapeutic programs, discriminatory local and federal policies, criminalization, incarceration, and a broad cultural consensus that views suffering as a consequence of personal flaws and bad choices. Combining hard-hitting policy analysis with an intimate account of how marginalized women navigate an unforgiving world, Susan Sered and Maureen Norton-Hawk shine new light on the deep and complex connections between suffering and social inequality.

The Age of Reagan

The Fall of the Old Liberal Order, 1964-1980
Author: Steven F. Hayward
Publisher: Crown Forum
ISBN: 0307453693
Category: History
Page: 811
View: 9344

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Brings to life the tumultuous decade and a half that preceded Ronald Reagan's ascent to the White House, taking us on an engrossing journey through the most politically divisive period the US has endured since the Civil War. Reprint.

Poverty in America

the welfare dilemma
Author: Ralph Segalman,Asoke Basu
Publisher: Greenwood Pub Group
ISBN: N.A
Category: Political Science
Page: 418
View: 5438

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The Divide

American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap
Author: Matt Taibbi
Publisher: Spiegel & Grau
ISBN: 0679645462
Category: Political Science
Page: 448
View: 5650

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST, NPR, AND KIRKUS REVIEWS A scathing portrait of an urgent new American crisis Over the last two decades, America has been falling deeper and deeper into a statistical mystery: Poverty goes up. Crime goes down. The prison population doubles. Fraud by the rich wipes out 40 percent of the world’s wealth. The rich get massively richer. No one goes to jail. In search of a solution, journalist Matt Taibbi discovered the Divide, the seam in American life where our two most troubling trends—growing wealth inequality and mass incarceration—come together, driven by a dramatic shift in American citizenship: Our basic rights are now determined by our wealth or poverty. The Divide is what allows massively destructive fraud by the hyperwealthy to go unpunished, while turning poverty itself into a crime—but it’s impossible to see until you look at these two alarming trends side by side. In The Divide, Matt Taibbi takes readers on a galvanizing journey through both sides of our new system of justice—the fun-house-mirror worlds of the untouchably wealthy and the criminalized poor. He uncovers the startling looting that preceded the financial collapse; a wild conspiracy of billionaire hedge fund managers to destroy a company through dirty tricks; and the story of a whistleblower who gets in the way of the largest banks in America, only to find herself in the crosshairs. On the other side of the Divide, Taibbi takes us to the front lines of the immigrant dragnet; into the newly punitive welfare system which treats its beneficiaries as thieves; and deep inside the stop-and-frisk world, where standing in front of your own home has become an arrestable offense. As he narrates these incredible stories, he draws out and analyzes their common source: a perverse new standard of justice, based on a radical, disturbing new vision of civil rights. Through astonishing—and enraging—accounts of the high-stakes capers of the wealthy and nightmare stories of regular people caught in the Divide’s punishing logic, Taibbi lays bare one of the greatest challenges we face in contemporary American life: surviving a system that devours the lives of the poor, turns a blind eye to the destructive crimes of the wealthy, and implicates us all. Praise for The Divide “Ambitious . . . deeply reported, highly compelling . . . impossible to put down.”—The New York Times Book Review “These are the stories that will keep you up at night. . . . The Divide is not just a report from the new America; it is advocacy journalism at its finest.”—Los Angeles Times “Taibbi is a relentless investigative reporter. He takes readers inside not only investment banks, hedge funds and the blood sport of short-sellers, but into the lives of the needy, minorities, street drifters and illegal immigrants. . . . The Divide is an important book. Its documentation is powerful and shocking.”—The Washington Post “Captivating . . . The Divide enshrines its author’s position as one of the most important voices in contemporary American journalism.”—The Independent (UK) “Taibbi [is] perhaps the greatest reporter on Wall Street’s crimes in the modern era.”—Salon From the Hardcover edition.