Carolina Scots

An Historical and Genealogical Study of Over 100 Years of Emigration
Author: Douglas F. Kelly,Caroline Switzer Kelly
Publisher: Seventeen Thirty Nine Publications
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 485
View: 6379

Continue Reading →

"Part I stands on its own as an historical study of early emigrations following the lead of the Argyll Colony in 1739 ... Part II provides a comprehensive listing of names and locations of Scottish North and South Carolina families beginning in 1739 and continuing with the descendents down to three, four or five generations for nearly a century."--Front flap of jacket.

The Highland Scots of North Carolina, 1732-1776


Author: Duane Meyer
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469620626
Category: History
Page: 230
View: 7167

Continue Reading →

Meyer addresses himself principally to two questions. Why did many thousands of Scottish Highlanders emigrate to America in the eighteenth century, and why did the majority of them rally to the defense of the Crown. . . . Offers the most complete and intelligent analysis of them that has so far appeared.--William and Mary Quarterly Using a variety of original sources -- official papers, travel documents, diaries, and newspapers -- Duane Meyer presents an impressively complete reconstruction of the settlement of the Highlanders in North Carolina. He examines their motives for migration, their life in America, and their curious political allegiance to George III.

The Highland Scots of North Carolina, 1732-1776


Author: Duane Meyer
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469620626
Category: History
Page: 230
View: 3251

Continue Reading →

Meyer addresses himself principally to two questions. Why did many thousands of Scottish Highlanders emigrate to America in the eighteenth century, and why did the majority of them rally to the defense of the Crown. . . . Offers the most complete and intelligent analysis of them that has so far appeared.--William and Mary Quarterly Using a variety of original sources -- official papers, travel documents, diaries, and newspapers -- Duane Meyer presents an impressively complete reconstruction of the settlement of the Highlanders in North Carolina. He examines their motives for migration, their life in America, and their curious political allegiance to George III.

Highland Heritage

Scottish Americans in the American South
Author: R. Celeste Ray
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9780807849132
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 867

Continue Reading →

Explores how the Scottish heritage and folklore thrives and blends with Southern regional myths and culture, and how that creates a unique sense of identity for Scottish Americans.

Scottish Emigration to Colonial America, 1607-1785


Author: David Dobson
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820340782
Category: History
Page: 280
View: 9357

Continue Reading →

Before 1650, only a few hundred Scots had trickled into the American colonies, but by the early 1770s the number had risen to 10,000 per year. A conservative estimate of the total number of Scots who settled in North America prior to 1785 is around 150,000. Who were these Scots? What did they do? Where did they settle? What factors motivated their emigration? Dobson's work, based on original research on both sides of the Atlantic, comprehensively identifies the Scottish contribution to the settlement of North America prior to 1785, with particular emphasis on the seventeenth century.

The Scots-Irish in the Carolinas


Author: Billy Kennedy
Publisher: Emerald House Group
ISBN: 9781840300130
Category: North Carolina
Page: 208
View: 4007

Continue Reading →

Included in this study are four United States presidents who were "direct descendants of the first frontier Carolina settlers" and John C. Calhoun, U.S. Vice-President and "the son of an Ulsterman who settled in the Carolina upcountry."--Cover.

Wayfaring Strangers

The Musical Voyage from Scotland and Ulster to Appalachia
Author: Fiona Ritchie,Doug Orr
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469618230
Category: Music
Page: 384
View: 1098

Continue Reading →

Throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, a steady stream of Scots migrated to Ulster and eventually onward across the Atlantic to resettle in the United States. Many of these Scots-Irish immigrants made their way into the mountains of the southern Appalachian region. They brought with them a wealth of traditional ballads and tunes from the British Isles and Ireland, a carrying stream that merged with sounds and songs of English, German, Welsh, African American, French, and Cherokee origin. Their enduring legacy of music flows today from Appalachia back to Ireland and Scotland and around the globe. In Wayfaring Strangers, Fiona Ritchie and Doug Orr guide readers on a musical voyage across oceans, linking people and songs through centuries of adaptation and change. From ancient ballads at the heart of the tradition to instruments that express this dynamic music, Ritchie and Orr chronicle the details of an epic journey. Enriched by the insights of key contributors to the living tradition on both sides of the Atlantic, this abundantly illustrated volume includes a CD featuring 20 songs by musicians profiled in the book, including Dolly Parton, Dougie MacLean, Cara Dillon, John Doyle, Pete Seeger, Sheila Kay Adams, Jean Ritchie, Doc Watson, David Holt, Anais Mitchell, Al Petteway, and Amy White.

Ulster to America

The Scots-Irish Migration Experience, 1680–1830
Author: Warren R. Hofstra
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 1572338326
Category: History
Page: 292
View: 9688

Continue Reading →

In Ulster to America: The Scots-Irish Migration Experience, 1680–1830, editor Warren R. Hofstra has gathered contributions from pioneering scholars who are rewriting the history of the Scots-Irish. In addition to presenting fresh information based on thorough and detailed research, they offer cutting-edge interpretations that help explain the Scots-Irish experience in the United States. In place of implacable Scots-Irish individualism, the writers stress the urge to build communities among Ulster immigrants. In place of rootlessness and isolation, the authors point to the trans-Atlantic continuity of Scots-Irish settlement and the presence of Germans and Anglo-Americans in so-called Scots-Irish areas. In a variety of ways, the book asserts, the Scots-Irish actually modified or abandoned some of their own cultural traits as a result of interacting with people of other backgrounds and in response to many of the main themes defining American history. While the Scots-Irish myth has proved useful over time to various groups with their own agendas—including modern-day conservatives and fundamentalist Christians—this book, by clearing away long-standing but erroneous ideas about the Scots-Irish, represents a major advance in our understanding of these immigrants. It also places Scots-Irish migration within the broader context of the historiographical construct of the Atlantic world. Organized in chronological and migratory order, this volume includes contributions on specific U.S. centers for Ulster immigrants: New Castle, Delaware; Donegal Springs, Pennsylvania; Carlisle, Pennsylvania; Opequon, Virginia; the Virginia frontier; the Carolina backcountry; southwestern Pennsylvania, and Kentucky. Ulster to America is essential reading for scholars and students of American history, immigration history, local history, and the colonial era, as well as all those who seek a fuller understanding of the Scots-Irish immigrant story.

Scots and Scotch Irish

Frontier Life in North Carolina, Virginia, and Kentucky
Author: Larry J. Hoefling
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780982231326
Category: History
Page: 160
View: 9967

Continue Reading →

They left Ireland by the boatload to head for America before the Revolution, and settled on the rugged western frontiers of the colonies. The descendants of Scotsmen who had colonized the Irish Kingdom of Ulster, they lived for several generations on Irish soil before heading across the Atlantic and the backwoods of America. They founded communities in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia and the Yadkin River valley of western North Carolina, eventually crossing the Cumberland Gap for the Kentucky frontier. For those Scots-Irish immigrants, life was a test of hardiness, hardship, and endurance, but frontier families also managed time for horseracing, gambling, and socializing - despite their strict Presbyterian ways. They founded churches and helped mold the governments of the new country. Scots and Scotch Irish offers a view of that time and place, along with thousands of names of those early settlers, drawn from church records, military rolls, deeds, court records, and newspapers of the time, all listed alphabetically in a series of appendices by source.

Scots: Studies in its Literature and Language


Author: John M. Kirk,Iseabail |Macleod
Publisher: Rodopi
ISBN: 9401209901
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 309
View: 5564

Continue Reading →

The skillful use of the Scots language has long been a distinguishing feature of the literatures of Scotland. The essays in this volume make a major contribution to our understanding of the Scots language, past and present, and its written dissemination in poetry, fiction and drama, and in non-literary texts, such as personal letters. They cover aspects of the development of a national literature in the Scots language, and they also give due weight to its international dimension by focusing on translations into Scots from languages as diverse as Greek, Latin and Chinese, and by considering the spread of written Scots to Northern Ireland, the United States of America and Australia. Many of the essays respond to and extend the scholarship of J. Derrick McClure, whose considerable impact on Scottish literary and linguistic studies is surveyed and assessed in this volume.

Born Fighting

How the Scots-Irish Shaped America
Author: Jim Webb
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 9780767922951
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 8791

Continue Reading →

In his first work of nonfiction, bestselling novelist James Webb tells the epic story of the Scots-Irish, a people whose lives and worldview were dictated by resistance, conflict, and struggle, and who, in turn, profoundly influenced the social, political, and cultural landscape of America from its beginnings through the present day. More than 27 million Americans today can trace their lineage to the Scots, whose bloodline was stained by centuries of continuous warfare along the border between England and Scotland, and later in the bitter settlements of England’s Ulster Plantation in Northern Ireland. Between 250,000 and 400,000 Scots-Irish migrated to America in the eighteenth century, traveling in groups of families and bringing with them not only long experience as rebels and outcasts but also unparalleled skills as frontiersmen and guerrilla fighters. Their cultural identity reflected acute individualism, dislike of aristocracy and a military tradition, and, over time, the Scots-Irish defined the attitudes and values of the military, of working class America, and even of the peculiarly populist form of American democracy itself. Born Fighting is the first book to chronicle the full journey of this remarkable cultural group, and the profound, but unrecognized, role it has played in the shaping of America. Written with the storytelling verve that has earned his works such acclaim as “captivating . . . unforgettable” (the Wall Street Journal on Lost Soliders), Scots-Irishman James Webb, Vietnam combat veteran and former Naval Secretary, traces the history of his people, beginning nearly two thousand years ago at Hadrian’s Wall, when the nation of Scotland was formed north of the Wall through armed conflict in contrast to England’s formation to the south through commerce and trade. Webb recounts the Scots’ odyssey—their clashes with the English in Scotland and then in Ulster, their retreat from one war-ravaged land to another. Through engrossing chronicles of the challenges the Scots-Irish faced, Webb vividly portrays how they developed the qualities that helped settle the American frontier and define the American character. Born Fighting shows that the Scots-Irish were 40 percent of the Revolutionary War army; they included the pioneers Daniel Boone, Lewis and Clark, Davy Crockett, and Sam Houston; they were the writers Edgar Allan Poe and Mark Twain; and they have given America numerous great military leaders, including Stonewall Jackson, Ulysses S. Grant, Audie Murphy, and George S. Patton, as well as most of the soldiers of the Confederacy (only 5 percent of whom owned slaves, and who fought against what they viewed as an invading army). It illustrates how the Scots-Irish redefined American politics, creating the populist movement and giving the country a dozen presidents, including Andrew Jackson, Teddy Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Ronald Reagan, and Bill Clinton. And it explores how the Scots-Irish culture of isolation, hard luck, stubbornness, and mistrust of the nation’s elite formed and still dominates blue-collar America, the military services, the Bible Belt, and country music. Both a distinguished work of cultural history and a human drama that speaks straight to the heart of contemporary America, Born Fighting reintroduces America to its most powerful, patriotic, and individualistic cultural group—one too often ignored or taken for granted.

A Nutshell History of North Carolina


Author: Ben Fortson
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1625856733
Category: Photography
Page: 240
View: 9993

Continue Reading →

From its dubious beginnings as a pirate-filled colony to a popular tourist destination, North Carolina has an amazingly colorful history. Author and illustrator Ben Fortson presents that history in the form of off-the-wall anecdotes, poignant insights and sublimely silly illustrations. Take a hilarious look at Daniel Boone’s larger-than-life Carolina personality. Peruse an uproarious account of the Andrew Jackson birthplace controversy or politically astute commentary on the power of tobacco in the state. Fortson takes readers on a side-splitting and educational ride through the annals of Tar Heel State history.

The Scotch-Irish

A Social History
Author: James G. Leyburn
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807888915
Category: History
Page: 397
View: 9754

Continue Reading →

Dispelling much of what he terms the 'mythology' of the Scotch-Irish, James Leyburn provides an absorbing account of their heritage. He discusses their life in Scotland, when the essentials of their character and culture were shaped; their removal to Northern Ireland and the action of their residence in that region upon their outlook on life; and their successive migrations to America, where they settled especially in the back-country of Pennsylvania, Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia, and then after the Revolutionary War were in the van of pioneers to the west.

Researching Scots-Irish Ancestors

The Essential Genealogical Guide to Early Modern Ulster, 1600-1800
Author: William J. Roulston
Publisher: Ulster Historical Foundation
ISBN: 9781903688533
Category: History
Page: 262
View: 2808

Continue Reading →

One of the greatest frustrations for generations of genealogical researchers has been that reliable guidance on sources for perhaps the most critical period in the establishment of their family’s links with Ulster, the period up to 1800, has proved to be so elusive. Not any more. This book can claim to be the first comprehensive guide for family historians searching for ancestors in 17th- and 18th-century Ulster. Whether their ancestors are of English, Scottish or Gaelic Irish origin, it will be of enormous value to anyone wishing to conduct research in Ulster prior to 1800. A comprehensive range of sources from the period 1600-1800 are identified and explained in very clear terms. Information on the whereabouts of these records and how they may be accessed is also provided. Equally important, there is guidance on how effectively they might be used. The appendices to the book include a full listing of pre-1800 church records for Ulster; a detailed description of nearly 250 collections of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century estate papers; and a summary breakdown of the sources available from this period for each parish in Ulster. William Roulston is Research Officer with the Ulster Historical Foundation.

Carolina Cradle

Settlement of the Northwest Carolina Frontier, 1747-1762
Author: Robert W. Ramsey
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469616793
Category: History
Page: 264
View: 5896

Continue Reading →

This account of the settlement of one segment of the North Carolina frontier -- the land between the Yadkin and Catawba rivers -- examines the process by which the piedmont South was populated. Through its ingenious use of hundreds of sources and documents, Robert Ramsey traces the movement of the original settlers and their families from the time they stepped onto American shores to their final settlement in the northwest Carolina territory. He considers the economic, religious, social, and geographical influences that led the settlers to Rowan County and describes how this frontier community was organized and supervised.