Field Geology in the British Isles

A Guide to Regional Excursions
Author: J. G. C. Anderson
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 1483293130
Category: Science
Page: 354
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The first book to cover geological excursions for the whole of the British Isles. Information on the best means of studying geology in the field in the British Isles is followed by descriptions of 194 geological itineraries based on a number of centres and a final chapter on the geology evident on 31 journeys by road, rail and coastal boat. Sketch maps indicate the routes of all the excursions with maps showing the geology of each region. These are detailed for those areas for which modern geological maps are not available.

Caledonian Structures in Britain

South of the Midland Valley
Author: J.E. Treagus
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401122881
Category: Science
Page: 177
View: 651

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This volume deals with those sites selected as part of the Geological Conservation Review (GCR) within the southern British part of the Caledonides, that is, the paratectonic Caledonides - a Caledonian terrane without strong and pervasive deformation and metamorphism, such as occurred further north. This orogenic belt formed by long and complex processes of earth movements between 500 and 380 million years before the present (?late Cambrian to mid-Devonian times), and has been classic ground for geologists for two hundred years. It is perhaps no accident that James Hutton in 1795 chose to illustrate his geostrophic cycle (and unconformity) with three visually explicit examples of the deformation wrought on Lower Palaeozoic rocks by Caledonian events. The former Caledonian mountain chain, which can be seen today in fragmented pieces in Scandinavia, Britain and Ireland, and North America, was ultimately the result of the collision of two continental plates and the closure of a former ocean, Iapetus. Some of these fragments, including those in Scandinavia, southern Britain, and the Republic of Ireland and the Maritime Provinces of Canada, are thought to have lain on the south side of the ocean before collision: the rest of North America, northern Ireland, and Scotland are thought to have lain north of the former Iapetus.

Uplift, Erosion and Stability

Perspectives on Long-term Landscape Development
Author: Bernard J. Smith,W. B. Whalley,Patricia A. Warke
Publisher: Geological Society of London
ISBN: 9781862390478
Category: Architecture
Page: 278
View: 5287

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British regional geology

the Hampshire Basin and adjoining areas
Author: R. V. Melville,E. C. Freshney,Charles Panzetta Chatwin,Institute of Geological Sciences (Great Britain),Natural Environment Council (Great Britain)
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Science
Page: 146
View: 3539

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British regional geology

the Welsh borderland
Author: Roy Woodhouse Pocock,Talbot Haes Whitehead,Geological Survey of Great Britain,Museum of Practical Geology (Great Britain)
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Geology
Page: 83
View: 8471

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The Geology of England and Wales


Author: P. J. Brenchley
Publisher: Geological Society of London
ISBN: 9781862392007
Category: Science
Page: 559
View: 2657

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This second edition of The Geology of England and Wales is considerably expanded from its predecessor, reflecting the increase in our knowledge of the region, and particularly of the offshore areas. Forty specialists have contributed to 18 chapters, which cover a time range from 700 million years ago to 200 million years into the future. A new format places all the chapters in approximately temporal order. Both offshore and economic geology now form an integral part of appropriate chapters. Most of England and Wales is formed from part of a single terrane, Avalonia, and its pre-Cambrian (Neoproterozoic) history is preserved in patches. However the time intervals from the Cambrian to the present day are well represented in our sequences and the Cambrian, Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian systems were all defined here. William Smith's map of England and Wales was the world's first geological map of a country and the British Geological Survey's copy is reproduced in the introductory chapter. This chapter, by the editors, consists of a broad overview aimed particularly at the non-specialist while guiding the reader towards the appropriate succeeding chapters. The volume concludes with a look at the future, from the short-term effects of climate change and sea-level rise to the position of our region in a possible plate tectonic configuration 200 million years hence. While the authors have taken a 'dynamic' view of the evolution of the area over geological time, they have also ensured that the geological evidence on which the interpretations are based is reviewed thoroughly. Hence the volume provides a valuable resource for both Earth scientists and the broader community.