Brilliant Discourse

Pictures and Readers in Early Modern Rome
Author: Evelyn Lincoln
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780300204193
Category: Design
Page: 302
View: 2545

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Sixteenth-century Roman presses turned out hundreds of technical treatises and learned discourses written in the vernacular. Covering topics as diverse as the cultivation of silkworms, the lives of the saints, and the order of the cosmos, they made esoteric knowledge accessible to a broad spectrum of readers. Many of these books were illustrated with beautiful etchings, engravings, or woodcuts, and some were written in the form of theatrical and engaging dialogues. For writers, publishers, printers, and artists, bringing such books into the world changed the lives of those involved in their production. The process of publication, a risky business in itself, forged lively social networks centered on making and reading these treatises. Brilliant Discourse follows the story of the Roman illustrated book from the printed page back out to the Renaissance streets, piazzas, palaces, convents, and bookshops where these expensive publications, carefully shepherded through the press, acted in the real world to create lively communities of readers and viewers.

The Routledge Handbook of Material Culture in Early Modern Europe


Author: Catherine Richardson,Tara Hamling,David Gaimster
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317042859
Category: History
Page: 486
View: 5083

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The Routledge Handbook of Material Culture in Early Modern Europe marks the arrival of early modern material culture studies as a vibrant, fully-established field of multi-disciplinary research. The volume provides a rounded, accessible collection of work on the nature and significance of materiality in early modern Europe – a term that embraces a vast range of objects as well as addressing a wide variety of human interactions with their physical environments. This stimulating view of materiality is distinctive in asking questions about the whole material world as a context for lived experience, and the book considers material interactions at all social levels. There are 27 chapters by leading experts as well as 13 feature object studies to highlight specific items that have survived from this period (defined broadly as c.1500–c.1800). These contributions explore the things people acquired, owned, treasured, displayed and discarded, the spaces in which people used and thought about things, the social relationships which cluster around goods – between producers, vendors and consumers of various kinds – and the way knowledge travels around those circuits of connection. The content also engages with wider issues such as the relationship between public and private life, the changing connections between the sacred and the profane, or the effects of gender and social status upon lived experience. Constructed as an accessible, wide-ranging guide to research practice, the book describes and represents the methods which have been developed within various disciplines for analysing pre-modern material culture. It comprises four sections which open up the approaches of various disciplines to non-specialists: ‘Definitions, disciplines, new directions’, ‘Contexts and categories’, ‘Object studies’ and ‘Material culture in action’. This volume addresses the need for sustained, coherent comment on the state, breadth and potential of this lively new field, including the work of historians, art historians, museum curators, archaeologists, social scientists and literary scholars. It consolidates and communicates recent developments and considers how we might take forward a multi-disciplinary research agenda for the study of material culture in periods before the mass production of goods.

The Palgrave Handbook of Early Modern Literature and Science


Author: Howard Marchitello,Evelyn Tribble
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137463619
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 544
View: 7203

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This book is about the complex ways in which science and literature are mutually-informing and mutually-sustaining. It does not cast the literary and the scientific as distinct, but rather as productively in-distinct cultural practices: for the two dozen new essays collected here, the presiding concern is no longer to ask how literary writers react to scientific writers, but rather to study how literary and scientific practices are imbricated. These specially-commissioned essays from top scholars in the area range across vast territories and produce seemingly unlikely unions: between physics and rhetoric, math and Milton, Boyle and the Bible, plague and plays, among many others. In these essays so-called scientific writing turns out to traffic in metaphor, wit, imagination, and playfulness normally associated with literature provides material forms and rhetorical strategies for thinking physics, mathematics, archeology, and medicine.

Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy

Bartolomeo Scappi's Paper Kitchens
Author: Deborah L. Krohn
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317134559
Category: Art
Page: 284
View: 1208

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Though Bartolomeo Scappi's Opera (1570), the first illustrated cookbook, is well known to historians of food, up to now there has been no study of its illustrations, unique in printed books through the early seventeenth century. In Food and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy, Krohn both treats the illustrations in Scappi's cookbook as visual evidence for a lost material reality; and through the illustrations, including several newly-discovered hand-colored examples, connects Scappi's Opera with other types of late Renaissance illustrated books. What emerges from both of these approaches is a new way of thinking about the place of cookbooks in the history of knowledge. Krohn argues that with the increasing professionalization of many skills and trades, Scappi was at the vanguard of a new way of looking not just at the kitchen-as workshop or laboratory-but at the ways in which artisanal knowledge was visualized and disseminated by a range of craftsmen, from engineers to architects. The recipes in Scappi's Opera belong on the one hand to a genre of cookery books, household manuals, and courtesy books that was well established by the middle of the sixteenth century, but the illustrations suggest connections to an entirely different and emergent world of knowledge. It is through study of the illustrations that these connections are discerned, explained, and interpreted. As one of the most important cookbooks for early modern Europe, the time is ripe for a focused study of Scappi's Opera in the various contexts in which Krohn frames it: book history, antiquarianism, and visual studies.

Die Kunst der Interpretation

italienische Reproduktionsgrafik 1485-1600
Author: Norberto Gramaccini,Hans Jakob Meier
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Art
Page: 518
View: 3075

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Julius Zebra - Raufen mit den Römern


Author: Gary Northfield
Publisher: cbt Verlag
ISBN: 3641167566
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 288
View: 1388

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Du glaubst du weißt alles über Zebras? Du hast ja keine Ahnung! Julius Zebra ist eigentlich ganz zufrieden mit seinem Leben. Wenn er nur nicht zum Trinken immer an dieses stinkige Wasserloch müsste. Und überall diese Löwen ... Dann, eines Tages wird Julius entführt. Nach Rom. Und plötzlich findet er sich mitten in der Arena als Gladiator wieder! Zum Glück ist er nicht allein, denn die Ausbildung ist hart. Gemeinsam mit seinen tierischen Freunden wird Julius versehentlich zum großen Held der Arena. Und das trotz der komischen Windeln, die sie dabei tragen müssen ...

Brilliant Effects

A Cultural History of Gem Stones and Jewellery
Author: Marcia R. Pointon
Publisher: Paul Mellon Ctr for Studies
ISBN: N.A
Category: Antiques & Collectibles
Page: 426
View: 5811

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Pointon examines how small-scale and valuable artefacts have figured in systems of belief and in political and social practice in Europe since the Renaissance.

Eine kurze Geschichte der Menschheit


Author: Yuval Noah Harari
Publisher: DVA
ISBN: 364110498X
Category: History
Page: 528
View: 1663

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Krone der Schöpfung? Vor 100 000 Jahren war der Homo sapiens noch ein unbedeutendes Tier, das unauffällig in einem abgelegenen Winkel des afrikanischen Kontinents lebte. Unsere Vorfahren teilten sich den Planeten mit mindestens fünf weiteren menschlichen Spezies, und die Rolle, die sie im Ökosystem spielten, war nicht größer als die von Gorillas, Libellen oder Quallen. Vor 70 000 Jahren dann vollzog sich ein mysteriöser und rascher Wandel mit dem Homo sapiens, und es war vor allem die Beschaffenheit seines Gehirns, die ihn zum Herren des Planeten und zum Schrecken des Ökosystems werden ließ. Bis heute hat sich diese Vorherrschaft stetig zugespitzt: Der Mensch hat die Fähigkeit zu schöpferischem und zu zerstörerischem Handeln wie kein anderes Lebewesen. Anschaulich, unterhaltsam und stellenweise hochkomisch zeichnet Yuval Harari die Geschichte des Menschen nach und zeigt alle großen, aber auch alle ambivalenten Momente unserer Menschwerdung.

Faces

eine Geschichte des Gesichts
Author: Hans Belting
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9783406644306
Category: Face in art
Page: 343
View: 8341

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Wo immer der Mensch im Bild erscheint, steht das Gesicht im Mittelpunkt. Gleichzeitig trotzt das Gesicht allen Versuchen, es auf Bilder festzulegen. Im Bild erstarrt es zur Maske, gegen die das lebendige Gesicht als Gegenspieler auftritt. Hans Belting erkundet diese Spannung in seiner grandiosen Geschichte des Gesichts - der ersten, die je geschrieben wurde. Sie beginnt bei den Masken der Steinzeit und endet bei den Gesichtern, die die modernen Massenmedien produzieren. In Theatermasken und der Mimik des Schauspielers, im europäischen Porträt und in der Fotografie, im Film und in der Gegenwartskunst entdeckt Belting die vielfältigen Versuche, sich des Gesichts zu bemächtigen, und deren permanentes Scheitern am Leben des Gesichts und des Selbst. 0.

SPQR

Die tausendjährige Geschichte Roms
Author: Mary Beard
Publisher: S. Fischer Verlag
ISBN: 3104031444
Category: History
Page: 656
View: 9445

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Wer hätte gedacht, dass Alte Geschichte so spannend und gegenwärtig sein kann? – Ein neuer Blick auf das alte Rom! Unkonventionell, scharfsinnig und zugleich akademisch versiert – dies trifft nicht nur auf die hochrenommierte Althistorikerin und Cambridge-Professorin Mary Beard selbst zu, sondern auch auf ihre neue große Geschichte des Römischen Reichs und seiner Bewohner: SPQR - Die tausendjährige Geschichte Roms. Begeistert erzählt sie die Geschichte eines Weltreichs, lässt uns Kriege, Exzesse, Intrigen miterleben, aber auch den römischen Alltag – wie Ärger in den Mietshäusern und Ciceros Scheidung. Sie lässt uns hinter die Legenden und Mythen blicken, hinterfragt sicher Geglaubtes und kommt zu überraschenden Einsichten. So erscheint Rom ganz nah – in seinen Debatten über Integration und Migration – und dann doch auch faszinierend fern, wenn es etwa um Sklaverei geht. Die Geschichte Roms für unsere Zeit. In prächtiger Ausstattung, mit über hundert s/w Abbildungen und umfangreichem farbigen Bildteil. »Bahnbrechend [...], anregend [...], revolutionär [...] ein völlig neuer Zugang zur Alten Geschichte.« Spectator »Aufregend, psychologisch scharfsinnig sowie mitfühlend kritisch.« Sunday Times »Meisterhaft [...], diese große Geschichte Roms erweckt die ferne Vergangenheit grandios zum Leben.« The Economist »Ungemein packend [...] ebenso unterhaltsam wie gelehrt.« Observer »Wer hätte gedacht, dass Geschichte so spannend sein kann?« Independent

Rituals, Images, and Words

Varieties of Cultural Expression in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe
Author: Francis William Kent,Charles Zika
Publisher: Brepols Pub
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 439
View: 6603

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This collection of essays by Australian scholars offers a wealth of contemporary perspectives on cultural communication amongst men and women in late medieval and early modern Europe. Essays dealing with Florence and Venice, with Rome, Lucca, Ferrara, and Bologna, as well as with Germany, England, and Lorraine, draw attention to the array of cultural expressions which competed for space and influence across European societies. These rich studies demonstrate the vitality of cultural production during a period of rapid and often violent transition. Variously focussed on formal religious rites, on painting, sculpture, and woodcuts, on sermons, poetry, and letters, the contributors pursue cultural meaning as a matter of social identity and social context - as a performance that can be shown to affirm and also exclude particular topical values. Rituals, Images and Words highlights the complex and subtle power of rhetorical forms in the history and historiography of late medieval and early modern Europe.

Roman Honor

The Fire in the Bones
Author: Carlin A. Barton
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520925649
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 326
View: 6662

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This book is an attempt to coax Roman history closer to the bone, to the breath and matter of the living being. Drawing from a remarkable array of ancient and modern sources, Carlin Barton offers the most complex understanding to date of the emotional and spiritual life of the ancient Romans. Her provocative and original inquiry focuses on the sentiments of honor that shaped the Romans' sense of themselves and their society. Speaking directly to the concerns and curiosities of the contemporary reader, Barton brings Roman society to life, elucidating the complex relation between the inner life of its citizens and its social fabric.Though thoroughly grounded in the ancient writings especially the work of Seneca, Cicero, and Livy this book also draws from contemporary theories of the self and social theory to deepen our understanding of ancient Rome. Barton explores the relation between inner desires and social behavior through an evocative analysis of the operation, in Roman society, of contests and ordeals, acts of supplication and confession, and the sense of shame. As she fleshes out Roman physical and psychological life, she particularly sheds new light on the consequential transition from republic to empire as a watershed of Roman social relations.Barton's ability to build productively on both old and new scholarship on Roman history, society, and culture and her imaginative use of a wide range of work in such fields as anthropology, sociology, psychology, modern history, and popular culture will make this book appealing for readers interested in many subjects. This beautifully written work not only generates insight into Roman history, but also uses that insight to bring us to a new understanding of ourselves, our modern codes of honor, and why it is that we think and act the way we do."

Artemisia Gentileschi Around 1622

The Shaping and Reshaping of an Artistic Identity
Author: Mary D. Garrard
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520228413
Category: Art
Page: 179
View: 2871

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"In this admirable work, at once passionately argued and lucidly written, Professor Garrard effectively considers the social, psychological, and formal complexity of the shaping and reshaping not only of the artist's feminine and feminist identity in the misogynistic society of the seventeenth century, but also of that identity in the discipline of art history today."—Steven Z. Levine, author of Monet, Narcissus, and Self-Reflection "Mary Garrard's detailed investigation into attribution problems in two Artemisia Gentileschi paintings brilliantly interweaves connoisseurship, constructions of gender and artistic identity, and historical analysis. The result is a richer and more nuanced vision of the best-known female artist in western history before the modern era, and an important contribution to feminist studies." —Whitney Chadwick, author of Women, Art, and Society "In her new book, Garrard has taken two bold steps that challenge much received opinion in the 'discipline' of art history. Analyzing two of Gentileschi's least violent but most moving images, Garrard argues that the painter's personality is discernible no less in the subjects and their interpretation than in the 'style' of the works; consideration of both aspects is essential to understanding the meaning of these extraordinary pictures and her authorship. Perhaps even more important, Garrard makes crystal clear that Artemisia Gentileschi, far from a 'good woman painter,' was one of the major visual thinkers of her time."—Irving Lavin, co-author with Marilyn Aronberg Lavin, of La Liturgia d'Amore: Immagini dal Canto dei Cantici nell'arte di Cimabue, Michelangelo, e Rembrandt (Modena, 2000) "Developing her earlier methodologies and revising some conclusions, Garrard clarifies her distinct theoretical approach and voice among feminist critiques of art history. In this text, which reads in part like a forensic mystery, Garrard builds not only an argument for attributions of particular works, but a new understanding of Gentileschi herself at a particular moment in history."—Hilary Robinson, editor of Visibly Female: Feminism and Art Today "One of our most distinguished feminist art historians brings contemporary gender studies to bear on traditional paintings connoisseurship to show how attributions to female artists have often been governed by tacit cultural assumptions about the limitations of women. Her case makes compelling reading for anyone interested in early modern society, culture, women and art in Italy, and in the problematics of feminism and art history."—Kathleen Weil-Garris Brandt, author of Leonardo e la Scultura "By revealing a great woman painter's ways of expressing uniqueness while negotiating expectations, Mary Garrard helps each of us with the subtleties of remaining authentic while living in the world. Artemisia Gentileschi around 1622 is art history to live by."—Gloria Steinem

Paul's Letter to the Romans

A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary
Author: Ben Witherington III,Darlene Hyatt
Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
ISBN: 9780802845047
Category: Religion
Page: 421
View: 9302

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Witherington gleans fresh insights from reading the text of Paul's epistle in light of early Jewish theology, the historical situation of Rome in the middle of first century A.D., and Paul's own rhetorical concerns.

Aesthetic Afterlives

Irony, Literary Modernity and the Ends of Beauty
Author: Andrew Eastham
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1441102086
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 272
View: 6610

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Since the development of British Aestheticism in the 1870s, the concept of irony has focused a series of anxieties which are integral to modern literary practice. Examining some of the most important debates in post-Romantic aesthetics through highly focused textual readings of authors from Walter Pater and Henry James to Samuel Beckett and Alan Hollinghurst, this study investigates the dialectical position of irony in Aestheticism and its twentieth-century afterlives. Aesthetic Afterlives constructs a far-reaching theoretical narrative by positioning Victorian Aestheticism as the basis of Literary Modernity. Aestheticism's cultivation of irony and reflexive detachment was central to this legacy, but it was also the focus of its own self-critique. Anxieties about the concept and practice of irony persisted through Modernism, and have recently been positioned in Hollinghurst's work as a symptom of the political stasis within post-modern culture. Referring to the recent debates about the 'new aestheticism' and the politics of aesthetics, Eastham asks how a utopian Aestheticism can be reconstructed from the problematics of irony and aesthetic autonomy that haunted writers from Pater to Adorno.

Der Gesellschaftsvertrag

oder Die Grundsätze des Staatsrechtes
Author: Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand
ISBN: 3954550539
Category: Philosophy
Page: 108
View: 7734

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Mit seiner 1762 veröffentlichten Abhandlung übte der französische Philosoph Jean-Jacques Rousseau einen wesentlichen Einfluss auf die politische Theorie der Französischen Revolution aus, zugleich sind seine radikalen Schlussfolgerungen bis heute umstritten: Im Zentrum des Buchs steht die These, dass zwischen den Individuen der Gesellschaft ein unausgesprochener Gesellschaftsvertrag existiert. Orientiert ist dieser Vertrag jedoch nicht an den Rechten des Einzelnen. Vielmehr dient der Vertrag ausschließlich dem Gemeinwohl, das in Rousseaus Augen das zugleich Vernünftige und deshalb allein Gerechte ist.