Breverton's Nautical Curiosities


Author: Terry Breverton
Publisher: Quercus
ISBN: 1623653207
Category: Reference
Page: 384
View: 3720

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Breverton's Nautical Curiosities is about ships, people and the sea. However, unlike many other nautical compendiums, the focus of this book is on the unusual, the overlooked or the downright extraordinary. Thus, someone most of us do not know, Admiral William Brown, is given equal coverage to Admiral Nelson. Without Admiral Brown releasing Garibaldi, modern Italy might not exist. And without the barely known genius John Ericsson designing the Monitor, the Confederacy might have won the American Civil War. Readers will be stimulated to read more about the remarkable men--explorers, admirals and trawlermen--who have shaped our world. The sea has had a remarkable effect upon our language. We hear the terms "steer clear," "hit the deck," "don't rock the boat," "to harbor a grudge" and the like, and give little thought to them. In the pages of this book, the reader will find the origin of "bumpkin," a "brace of shakes," "born with a silver spoon," "booby prize," "to take on board," "above board," "bombed" (in the sense of being drunk), the "blues," "blind-side," "blind drunk," "the pot calling the kettle black," "reach the bitter end," "wasters," "ahoy," "all at sea," "to keep aloof," "piss-artist," "taken aback," "barbecue" and "bamboozle." Other colourful terms, which have passed out of common usage, such as "bring one's arse to anchor" (sit down), "belly timber" (food) and "bog orange" (potato) are also included, as well as important pirate haunts, technical terms, famous battles, maritime inventors and ship speed records.

Breverton's Nautical Curiosities


Author: Terry Breverton
Publisher: Quercus
ISBN: 1623653207
Category: Reference
Page: 384
View: 1625

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Breverton's Nautical Curiosities is about ships, people and the sea. However, unlike many other nautical compendiums, the focus of this book is on the unusual, the overlooked or the downright extraordinary. Thus, someone most of us do not know, Admiral William Brown, is given equal coverage to Admiral Nelson. Without Admiral Brown releasing Garibaldi, modern Italy might not exist. And without the barely known genius John Ericsson designing the Monitor, the Confederacy might have won the American Civil War. Readers will be stimulated to read more about the remarkable men--explorers, admirals and trawlermen--who have shaped our world. The sea has had a remarkable effect upon our language. We hear the terms "steer clear," "hit the deck," "don't rock the boat," "to harbor a grudge" and the like, and give little thought to them. In the pages of this book, the reader will find the origin of "bumpkin," a "brace of shakes," "born with a silver spoon," "booby prize," "to take on board," "above board," "bombed" (in the sense of being drunk), the "blues," "blind-side," "blind drunk," "the pot calling the kettle black," "reach the bitter end," "wasters," "ahoy," "all at sea," "to keep aloof," "piss-artist," "taken aback," "barbecue" and "bamboozle." Other colourful terms, which have passed out of common usage, such as "bring one's arse to anchor" (sit down), "belly timber" (food) and "bog orange" (potato) are also included, as well as important pirate haunts, technical terms, famous battles, maritime inventors and ship speed records.

Breverton's Nautical Curiosities

A Book of the Sea
Author: Terry Breverton
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 1849166269
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 8136

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Breverton's Nautical Curiosities is about ships, people and the sea. However, unlike many other nautical compendiums, the focus of this book is on the unusual, the overlooked or the downright extraordinary. Thus, someone most of us do not know, Admiral William Brown, is given equal coverage to Admiral Nelson. Without Admiral Brown releasing Garibaldi, modern Italy might not exist. And without the barely known genius John Ericsson designing the Monitor, the Confederacy might have won the American Civil War. Readers will be stimulated to read more about the remarkable men - explorers, admirals and trawlermen - who have shaped our world. The sea has had a remarkable effect upon our language. We hear the terms 'steer clear of', 'hit the deck', 'don't rock the boat', 'to harbour a grudge' and the like, and give little thought to them. In the pages of this book, the reader will find the origin of 'bumpkin', a 'brace of shakes', 'born with a silver spoon', 'booby prize', 'to take on board', 'above board', 'bombed' (in the sense of being drunk), the 'blues', 'blind-side', 'blind drunk', 'the pot calling the kettle black', 'reach the bitter end', 'wasters', 'ahoy', 'all at sea', 'to keep aloof', 'piss-artist', 'taken aback', 'barbecue'' and 'bamboozle'. Other colourful terms, which have passed out of common usage, such as 'bring one's arse to anchor' (sit down), 'belly timber' (food) and 'bog orange' (potato) are also included, as well as important pirate haunts, technical terms, famous battles, maritime inventors and ship speed records.

Breverton's Complete Herbal


Author: Terry Breverton
Publisher: Quercus
ISBN: 1623653509
Category: Science
Page: 384
View: 3776

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Breverton's Complete Herbal is a modern reworking of Culpeper's classic reference guide, Culpeper's Complete Herbal. Arranged alphabetically, this book describes over 250 herbs and spices as well as feature entries on scented herb/medicinal gardens, the great herbalists and New World Herbs not included in Culpepper's original text. Each entry provides a description of the herb: its appearance and botanical features, a brief history of its uses in medicine, dyeing and cuisine to bizarre remedies and concoctions designed to get rid of all manner of real and imaginary ailments. As informative as it is entertaining, this incredibly diverse compendium contains just about everything you'll ever need to know about the properties and provenance of herbs and spices of the world. From amara dulcis to yarrow, all-heal to viper's bugloss, Breverton's Complete Herbal is a modern day treasury of over 250 herbs and their uses.

Breverton's Phantasmagoria


Author: Terry Breverton
Publisher: Quercus
ISBN: 1623652359
Category: Reference
Page: 384
View: 4218

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From dragons and wyverns to vampires, werewolves and mischievous gremlins, pixies and fairies, Breverton's Phantasmagoria is a unique compendium of over 250 mythical animals. Prepare to revisit familiar myths, such as vampires, werewolves and the Loch Ness Monster, the Minotaur and Medusa from Greek legend, and Biblical beasts such as Behemoth and Leviathan. Discover new mysterious animals like the giant serpents of Central America, the lethal Mongolian death worm, and the Ennedi tiger in Africa, and investigate the evidence for sightings of Bigfoot and the reclusive Yeti. Packed with quirky line illustrations and a wealth of weird and wonderful information, Breverton's Phantasmagoria surveys the globe to uncover over 250 imaginary creatures passed down from generation to generation.

Breverton's Encyclopedia of Inventions


Author: Terry Breverton
Publisher: Quercus Books
ISBN: 174334936X
Category: Reference
Page: 384
View: 8577

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Celebrating the ingenuity, creativity and resourcefulness that has led to some of the most amazing technological leaps through the ages, 'Breverton's Encyclopedia of Inventions' examines the key innovations and breakthroughs of all time and the genius behind them. Starting with the building of the pyramids in ancient Egypt and the discovery of the solar system, moving through surgery, dynamite and rockets, to modern technology such as the smart card and genetic engineering, Terry Breverton springs many surprises.

Phantasmagoria

A Compendium of Monsters, Myths and Legends
Author: Terry Breverton
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780762770236
Category: Reference
Page: 384
View: 1455

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A superbly illustrated guide to the mysteries of myth, legend, and—gulp!—real life.

Superstitions of the Sea


Author: James Clary
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780916637002
Category: Body, Mind & Spirit
Page: 360
View: 8964

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Combining captivating sketches by his brother, artist Ben Clary, and his own prized ghost ship portrayals, Jim Clary presents a compelling and riveting digest of beliefs, customs, and mystery in Superstitions of the Sea. Clary focuses on the vast array of strange, mythical, and often comical beliefs of mariners from ancient times to the present. Collecting the various topics for years. Clary found that maritime superstition was weaved throughout every fabric of his study. So interesting was the folklore that it often lured him far away from his subject search and held him spellbound for hours at a time. Clary offers a unique and encompassing classification of maritime superstitions, including anecdotes on: animals, burial, charms, demons, evil eyes, figureheads, ghost ships, hexes, icebergs, Jonahs, knots, launchings, myths, navigation, omens, people, romance, shipwrecks, triangles, the unexplained, Vikings, and weather phenomena. He combed through countless age-old volumes and interviewed today's sailors to bring to the reader incredible yarns and unbelievable recorded fact enshrouded in mystery.

When a Loose Cannon Flogs a Dead Horse There's the Devil to Pay: Seafaring Words in Everyday Speech


Author: Olivia Isil
Publisher: International Marine/Ragged Mountain Press
ISBN: 9780070328778
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 154
View: 4127

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Have you ever wondered about the origin of "son of a gun," "flotsam and jetsam," or "hunky-dory"? You'll find the nautical derivation of these expressions and more than 250 others in this collection of nautical metaphors and colloquialisms. In addition, this book includes thought-provoking and entertaining examples of these words drawn from literature, movies, and song, and contains sections of legends of the sea and weather lore. Fascinating reading for sailors and language enthusiasts alike. Here's the scuttlebutt: Barge right in and swallow the anchor, and let's chew the fat and splice the main brace 'til we're three sheets to the wind. Listen, you son of a sea cook, I'm tired of minding my P's and Q's. I tell you, I'm all at sea, and this is the bitter end. Nothing I can do will keep this ship on an even keel. Hells bells! You think I didn't tell it to the old man? Delivered a broadside, I did, but he just called me a loose cannon. Maybe I caught him between wind and water. Listen, mate. You'd better bootleg a bible aboard. We're sailing under false colors, and where we're headed it's cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey. It's Davy Jones' locker I'm talking about. The crew was scraped from the bottom of the barrel. They don't know the ropes, and anyway they're deserting like rats from a sinking ship. It's time to fish or cut bait, mate, or there'll be the devil to pay. No use flogging a dead horse. Let's stay armed to the teeth and look for any port in a storm. There'll be nothing but flotsam and jetsam when this tub goes down the hatch.

The Voyage of the Cormorant


Author: Christian Beamish
Publisher: Patagonia
ISBN: 1938340116
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 324
View: 2134

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Christian Beamish, a former editor at The Surfer’s Journal, envisioned a low-tech, self-reliant exploration for surf along the coast of North America, using primarily clothes and instruments available to his ancestors, and the 18-foot boat he would build by hand in his garage. How the vision met reality – and how the two came to shape each other – places Voyage of the Cormorant in the great American tradition of tales of life at sea, and what it has to teach us.

The Book of Barely Imagined Beings

A 21st Century Bestiary
Author: Caspar Henderson
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022604470X
Category: Nature
Page: 448
View: 492

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From medieval bestiaries to Borges’s Book of Imaginary Beings, we’ve long been enchanted by extraordinary animals, be they terrifying three-headed dogs or asps impervious to a snake charmer’s song. But bestiaries are more than just zany zoology—they are artful attempts to convey broader beliefs about human beings and the natural order. Today, we no longer fear sea monsters or banshees. But from the infamous honey badger to the giant squid, animals continue to captivate us with the things they can do and the things they cannot, what we know about them and what we don’t. With The Book of Barely Imagined Beings, Caspar Henderson offers readers a fascinating, beautifully produced modern-day menagerie. But whereas medieval bestiaries were often based on folklore and myth, the creatures that abound in Henderson’s book—from the axolotl to the zebrafish—are, with one exception, very much with us, albeit sometimes in depleted numbers. The Book of Barely Imagined Beings transports readers to a world of real creatures that seem as if they should be made up—that are somehow more astonishing than anything we might have imagined. The yeti crab, for example, uses its furry claws to farm the bacteria on which it feeds. The waterbear, meanwhile, is among nature’s “extreme survivors,” able to withstand a week unprotected in outer space. These and other strange and surprising species invite readers to reflect on what we value—or fail to value—and what we might change. A powerful combination of wit, cutting-edge natural history, and philosophical meditation, The Book of Barely Imagined Beings is an infectious and inspiring celebration of the sheer ingenuity and variety of life in a time of crisis and change.

Jack Tar and the Baboon Watch

A Guide to Curious Nautical Knowledge for Landlubbers and Sea Lawyers Alike
Author: Frank Lanier
Publisher: McGraw Hill Professional
ISBN: 0071824014
Category: History
Page: 208
View: 937

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Was the Titanic doomed because of its name? Can you really "swallow the anchor"? Jack Tar and the Baboon Watch is a collection of unusual, nautical-based phrases and trivia tidbits for Jack Tars* and landlubbers** alike. Author and mariner Frank Lanier began to compile these entries while serving in the Coast Guard; they were included in the Plan of the Day published aboard the various ships Lanier was stationed on starting in the 1980s. He explains these colorful terms and entertaining phrases in plain language and presents their origins—many of which will surprise you! Inside you will find words and phrases . . . FROM THE FAMILIAR . . . Over a Barrel--Sailors were sometimes tied over a barrel while being flogged. Rummage--A ship's cargo or the packing of it in the vessel's hold, the yardsale-type association of the term arising from the fact damaged cargo was often sold at a "rummage sale," a clearing out sale of unclaimed goods at the dock. Rubbernecker--A sailor who stood by and looked on as his shipmates worked. Square Meal--A solid, hearty meal, said to be derived from the square, wooden platters hot meals were served upon aboard ship in good weather. To "Fudge It"--A sailor's term for a lie, nonsense; exaggeration that can be traced to one Captain Fudge, a seventeenth-century sailor whose propensity for telling outrageous whoppers prompted his crew to meet any tale of dubious origin with a cry of "You Fudge It!" . . TO THE BIZARRE . . . Dog’s Vomit--A moist hash of hardtack biscuits and meat cooked together. Kissed by Mother Carey--Those whose destiny seemed forever tied to the sea. Suck the Monkey--The clandestine siphoning of spirits from one of the ship's casks via a straw or other such tube. Swallow the Anchor--An old salt who retired ashore, forever giving up his life at sea. With the intriguing Jack Tar and the Baboon Watch, you'll soon be able to talk like a sailor worth his salt! *Sailors **Unexperienced sailors

Strange Tales of the Sea


Author: Jack Strange
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781532792502
Category:
Page: 114
View: 812

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What lurks beneath the waves, and onboard the most mysterious of ships? Get ready to experience the lore and lure of the sea with these myths, legends and true stories. Centuries-old folklore and tales of haunted vessels. Sea monsters and ghosts. Cannibalism at sea, and mysterious disappearances. Included are also tales of seamen ashore, and the prostitutes and crimps that preyed on them. Find out what happened to stowaways, how they were treated, and about the myth that women were not welcome on ships. Welcome to Strange Tales of the Sea.

A New Map of Wonders

A Journey in Search of Modern Marvels
Author: Caspar Henderson
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022629207X
Category: Science
Page: 368
View: 5930

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We live in a world that is known, every corner thoroughly explored. But has this knowledge cost us the ability to wonder? Wonder, Caspar Henderson argues, is at its most supremely valuable in just such a world because it reaffirms our humanity and gives us hope for the future. That’s the power of wonder, and that’s what we should aim to cultivate in our lives. But what are the wonders of the modern world? Henderson’s brilliant exploration borrows from the form of one of the oldest and most widely known sources of wonder: maps. Large, detailed mappae mundi invited people in medieval Europe to vividly imagine places and possibilities they had never seen before: manticores with the head of a man, the body of a lion, and the stinging tail of a scorpion; tribes of one-eyed men who fought griffins for diamonds; and fearsome Scythian warriors who drank the blood of their enemies from their skulls. As outlandish as these maps and the stories that went with them sound to us today, Henderson argues that our views of the world today are sometimes no less incomplete or misleading. Scientists are only beginning to map the human brain, for example, revealing it as vastly more complex than any computer we can conceive. Our current understanding of physical reality is woefully incomplete. A New Map of Wonders explores these and other realms of the wonderful, in different times and cultures and in the present day, taking readers from Aboriginal Australian landscapes to sacred sites in Great Britain, all the while keeping sight questions such as the cognitive basis of wonder and the relationship between wonder and science. Beautifully illustrated and written with wit and moral complexity, this sequel to The Book of Barely Imagined Beings is a fascinating account of the power of wonder and an unforgettable meditation on its importance to our future.

Sloop

Restoring My Family's Wooden Sailboat--An Adventure in Old-Fashioned Values
Author: Daniel Robb
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439166048
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 288
View: 3749

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Now in paperback, Daniel Robb’s Sloop proves he “is a craftsman… with words as well as with a hammer, as he constructs a charming tale that both details the technical nature of boatbuilding and captures the essence of the past, present, and future of a New England maritime community” (Publishers Weekly). • Interest in the environment and ecology: Daniel robb decided to restore his family’s well-worn wooden sailboat in appreciation for its craftsmanship and out of respect for the environment for which it was intended. Sloop’s tribute to the simple life and one’s environment will resonate with sailing enthusiasts and anyone who appreciates fine craftsmanship. • Timeless values: robb voices an ethic in which things are valued and appreciated, especially well-designed objects that still have years of useful life in them. While die-hard sailors or woodworking fanatics will love this book, robb’s skill as a writer also makes this a fascinating read for anyone. His humorous account of his on-the-job learning experience and of the eccentric characters who share his values and helped him will delight readers. “Robb writes of his painstaking restoration of a rotted 12½- foot herreshoff that had floated on memory and emotion, and finally again on water.…a gem.” —David Mehegan, The Boston Globe “Whether you’re an old-time boat builder, a wooden boat enthusiast, or simply someone who appreciates words woven together masterfully, you’ll enjoy Sloop.” —Kathleen Szmit, Barnstable Patriot Author of Crossing the Water, Daniel Robb has been an editor of academic journals, a teacher, a political consultant on a congressional campaign, and a proprietor of a literary services business. He has also worked at sea on schooners, taught sailing, and raced in national competitions. Robb lives in Pelham, Massachusetts.

Jackspeak

A guide to British Naval slang & usage
Author: Rick Jolly
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1844861627
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 544
View: 2914

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Jackspeak is a comprehensive reference guide to the humorous and colourful slang of the Senior Service, explaining in layman's termsthe otherwise cryptic everyday language of the Royal Navy, the Royal Marines and the Fleet Air Arm. Featuring more than 4,000 alphabetical entries, it was compiled by an ex-RM surgeon who spent 24 years in theservice. With useful cross-references and examples of common usagethroughout, along with excellent illustrations by Tugg, the cartoonistfrom service newspaper Navy News, it is the essential book forcurrent and ex-Navy personnel and their families, or anyone interested in the modern armed forces. Conway is proud to present a revised and updated edition of this classic volume, which is already acknowledged as the standard reference for every Jack, Jenny and Royal joining the Andrew, or for any civvy who wants a real insight into the unique culture of the Navy.

Piri Reis Map of 1513


Author: Gregory C. McIntosh
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820343595
Category: History
Page: 232
View: 6966

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One of the most beautiful maps to survive the Great Age of Discoveries, the 1513 world map drawn by Ottoman admiral Piri Reis is also one of the most mysterious. Gregory McIntosh has uncovered new evidence in the map that shows it to be among the most important ever made. This detailed study offers new commentary and explication of a major milestone in cartography. Correcting earlier work of Paul Kahle and pointing out the traps that have caught subsequent scholars, McIntosh disproves the dubious conclusion that the Reis map embodied Columbus's Third Voyage map of 1498, showing that it draws instead on the Second Voyage of 1493-1496. He also refutes the popular misinterpretation that Reis's depictions of Antarctica are evidence of either ancient civilizations or extraterrestrial visitation. McIntosh brings together all that has been previously known about the map and also assembles for the first time the translations of all inscriptions on the map and analyzes all place-names given for New World and Atlantic islands. His work clarifies long-standing mysteries and opens up new ways of looking at the history of exploration.

Why Sailors Can't Swim and Other Marvellous Maritime Curiosities


Author: Nic Compton
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1408192632
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 96
View: 9126

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Why will a sailor never go to sea on Friday 13th? Why are boats always referred to as 'she'? How do you navigate the ocean without a compass? Does the Bermuda Triangle really exist? Why do sailors wear earrings? Did Blackbeard actually exist? Did Nelson really say 'Kiss me, Hardy'? What's the correct way to bury a body at sea? Why is a rope never called a rope? This fascinating collection of maritime folklore and trivia delves into the history, science and culture of the sea, and is packed full of entertaining, surprising and insightful facts, from the delightfully obscure to the amusingly quaint, including everyday expressions that have their origins on board ship. Topics include: sailors and superstitions; ships and shipbuilding; navigation and seamanship; pirates and smugglers; fish and fishermen; coasts and oceans; tides and weather; art and literature of the sea.