Black Trials

Citizenship from the Beginnings of Slavery to the End of Caste
Author: Mark S. Weiner
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307425037
Category: History
Page: 448
View: 2962

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From a brilliant young legal scholar comes this sweeping history of American ideas of belonging and citizenship, told through the stories of fourteen legal cases that helped to shape our nation. Spanning three centuries, Black Trials details the legal challenges and struggles that helped define the ever-shifting identity of blacks in America. From the well-known cases of Plessy v. Ferguson and the Clarence Thomas confirmation hearings to the more obscure trial of Joseph Hanno, an eighteenth-century free black man accused of murdering his wife and bringing smallpox to Boston, Weiner recounts the essential dramas of American identity—illuminating where our conception of minority rights has come from and where it might go. Significant and enthralling, these are the cases that forced the courts and the country to reconsider what it means to be black in America, and Mark Weiner demonstrates their lasting importance for our society. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Black Cosmopolitanism

Racial Consciousness and Transnational Identity in the Nineteenth-Century Americas
Author: Ifeoma Kiddoe Nwankwo
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812238788
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 291
View: 6851

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Through readings of slave narratives, fiction, poetry, nonfiction, newspaper editorials, and government documents including texts by Frederick Douglass and freed West Indian slave Mary Prince, Ifeoma Kiddoe Nwankwo explicates the growing interrelatedness of people of African descent through the Americas in the nineteenth century.

Slavery on Trial

Law, Abolitionism, and Print Culture
Author: Jeannine Marie DeLombard
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807887738
Category: History
Page: 344
View: 6381

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America's legal consciousness was high during the era that saw the imprisonment of abolitionist editor William Lloyd Garrison, the execution of slave revolutionary Nat Turner, and the hangings of John Brown and his Harpers Ferry co-conspirators. Jeannine Marie DeLombard examines how debates over slavery in the three decades before the Civil War employed legal language to "try" the case for slavery in the court of public opinion via popular print media. Discussing autobiographies by Frederick Douglass, a scandal narrative about Sojourner Truth, an abolitionist speech by Henry David Thoreau, sentimental fiction by Harriet Beecher Stowe, and a proslavery novel by William MacCreary Burwell, DeLombard argues that American literature of the era cannot be fully understood without an appreciation for the slavery debate in the courts and in print. Combining legal, literary, and book history approaches, Slavery on Trial provides a refreshing alternative to the official perspectives offered by the nation's founding documents, legal treatises, statutes, and judicial decisions. DeLombard invites us to view the intersection of slavery and law as so many antebellum Americans did--through the lens of popular print culture.

Love of Freedom

Black Women in Colonial and Revolutionary New England
Author: Catherine Adams,Elizabeth H. Pleck
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199779833
Category: Social Science
Page: 280
View: 4562

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They baked New England's Thanksgiving pies, preached their faith to crowds of worshippers, spied for the patriots during the Revolution, wrote that human bondage was a sin, and demanded reparations for slavery. Black women in colonial and revolutionary New England sought not only legal emancipation from slavery but defined freedom more broadly to include spiritual, familial, and economic dimensions. Hidden behind the banner of achieving freedom was the assumption that freedom meant affirming black manhood The struggle for freedom in New England was different for men than for women. Black men in colonial and revolutionary New England were struggling for freedom from slavery and for the right to patriarchal control of their own families. Women had more complicated desires, seeking protection and support in a male headed household while also wanting personal liberty. Eventually women who were former slaves began to fight for dignity and respect for womanhood and access to schooling for black children.

The Oxford Handbook of the African American Slave Narrative


Author: John Ernest
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199731489
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 472
View: 8453

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The Oxford Handbook of the African American Slave Narrative approaches the history of slave testimony in three ways: by prioritizing the broad tradition over individual authors; by representing interdisciplinary approaches to slave narratives; and by highlighting emerging scholarship on slave narratives, concerning both established debates over concerns of authorship and agency, for example, and developing concerns like ecocritical readings of slave narratives. Ultimately, the aim of the Handbook is not to highlight the singularity of any particular account, nor to comfortably locate slave narratives in traditional literary or cultural history, but rather to faithfully represent a body of writing and testimony that was designed to speak for the many, to represent the unspeakable, and to account for the experience of enslaved and nominally free communities.

Americans Without Law

The Racial Boundaries of Citizenship
Author: Mark S. Weiner
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814793649
Category: Law
Page: 197
View: 7058

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Americans Without Law shows how the racial boundaries of civic life are based on widespread perceptions about the relative capacity of minority groups for legal behavior, which Mark S. Weiner calls “juridical racialism.” The book follows the history of this civic discourse by examining the legal status of four minority groups in four successive historical periods: American Indians in the 1880s, Filipinos after the Spanish-American War, Japanese immigrants in the 1920s, and African Americans in the 1940s and 1950s. Weiner reveals the significance of juridical racialism for each group and, in turn, Americans as a whole by examining the work of anthropological social scientists who developed distinctive ways of understanding racial and legal identity, and through decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court that put these ethno-legal views into practice. Combining history, anthropology, and legal analysis, the book argues that the story of juridical racialism shows how race and citizenship served as a nexus for the professionalization of the social sciences, the growth of national state power, economic modernization, and modern practices of the self.

Public Library Core Collection

A Selection Guide to Reference Books and Adult Nonfiction. Nonfiction
Author: John Greenfieldt,Patrice Bartell
Publisher: Hw Wilson Co
ISBN: 9780824210946
Category: Public libraries
Page: 1856
View: 3189

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The Rule of the Clan

What an Ancient Form of Social Organization Reveals About the Future of Individual Freedom
Author: Mark S. Weiner
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1466836385
Category: Political Science
Page: 272
View: 5073

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A revealing look at the role kin-based societies have played throughout history and around the world A lively, wide-ranging meditation on human development that offers surprising lessons for the future of modern individualism, The Rule of the Clan examines the constitutional principles and cultural institutions of kin-based societies, from medieval Iceland to modern Pakistan. Mark S. Weiner, an expert in constitutional law and legal history, shows us that true individual freedom depends on the existence of a robust state dedicated to the public interest. In the absence of a healthy state, he explains, humans naturally tend to create legal structures centered not on individuals but rather on extended family groups. The modern liberal state makes individualism possible by keeping this powerful drive in check—and we ignore the continuing threat to liberal values and institutions at our peril. At the same time, for modern individualism to survive, liberals must also acknowledge the profound social and psychological benefits the rule of the clan provides and recognize the loss humanity sustains in its transition to modernity. Masterfully argued and filled with rich historical detail, Weiner's investigation speaks both to modern liberal societies and to developing nations riven by "clannism," including Muslim societies in the wake of the Arab Spring.

America, History and Life


Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Canada
Page: N.A
View: 9280

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Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.

Freedom in My Heart

Voices from the United States National Slavery Museum
Author: Cynthia Jacobs Carter
Publisher: National Geographic
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 255
View: 9018

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Captures the complete experience of American slavery, as well as the contributions of slaves and their descendants, in a beautifully illustrated volume that brings together artifacts, images, and documents from the United States National Slavery Museum, accompanied by commentary and reminiscences of slaves and their descendants. 15,000 first printing.

The New Jim Crow

Masseninhaftierung und Rassismus in den USA
Author: Michelle Alexander
Publisher: Antje Kunstmann
ISBN: 3956141598
Category: Political Science
Page: 352
View: 6358

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Die Wahl von Barack Obama im November 2008 markierte einen historischen Wendepunkt in den USA: Der erste schwarze Präsident schien für eine postrassistische Gesellschaft und den Triumph der Bürgerrechtsbewegung zu stehen. Doch die Realität in den USA ist eine andere. Obwohl die Rassentrennung, die in den sogenannten Jim-Crow-Gesetzen festgeschrieben war, im Zuge der Bürgerrechtsbewegung abgeschafft wurde, sitzt heute ein unfassbar hoher Anteil der schwarzen Bevölkerung im Gefängnis oder ist lebenslang als kriminell gebrandmarkt. Ein Status, der die Leute zu Bürgern zweiter Klasse macht, indem er sie ihrer grundsätzlichsten Rechte beraubt – ganz ähnlich den explizit rassistischen Diskriminierungen der Jim-Crow-Ära. In ihrem Buch, das in Amerika eine breite Debatte ausgelöst hat, argumentiert Michelle Alexander, dass die USA ihr rassistisches System nach der Bürgerrechtsbewegung nicht abgeschafft, sondern lediglich umgestaltet haben. Da unter dem perfiden Deckmantel des »War on Drugs« überproportional junge männliche Schwarze und ihre Communities kriminalisiert werden, funktioniert das drakonische Strafjustizsystem der USA heute wie das System rassistischer Kontrolle von gestern: ein neues Jim Crow.

Program


Author: Organization of American Historians. Meeting
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Historians
Page: N.A
View: 6216

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Democratization in America

A Comparative-Historical Analysis
Author: Desmond King,Robert C. Lieberman,Gretchen Ritter,Laurence Whitehead
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
ISBN: 9780801893254
Category: Political Science
Page: 352
View: 4864

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The essays in this volume examine democracy’s development in the United States, demonstrating how that process has shaped—and continues to shape—the American political system. Scholars of American politics commonly describe the political development of the United States as exceptional and distinct from that of other advanced industrial democracies. They point to the United States as the longest-lived and most stable liberal democracy in history. What they often fail to mention, though, is that it took considerable time to extend democracy throughout the country. The contributors to this volume suggest that it is intellectually fruitful to consider the U.S. case in comparison to other countries. They argue that the development of democracy is ongoing in America; that even with a written constitution grounded in liberal democracy, the meaning and significance of U.S. democracy are still evolving. This volume shows that democratization and the pursuit of democracy are processes affected by multiple and continuing challenges—including such issues as citizenship, race, institution building, and political movements—as patterns and practices of politics and governance continue to change. This innovative approach contributes significantly to comparative democratization studies, a field normally confined to Latin America and former communist countries. The U.S. case is a unique reference point for students of American political development and comparative democratization.

Sexual Body


Author: Shelly Eversley,Jennifer Morgan
Publisher: Feminist Press
ISBN: 9781558615519
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 192
View: 1705

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Feminists declare: Let's talk about sex.