Bart

The Dramatic History of the Bay Area Rapid Transit System
Author: Michael C. Healy
Publisher: Heyday Books
ISBN: 9781597143707
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 413

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A look at the onetimecontroversial but now vitally important transit system that uniquely established the direction of development and innovation in new urban transit systems

Railtown

The Fight for the Los Angeles Metro Rail and the Future of the City
Author: Ethan N. Elkind
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520957202
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 5554

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The familiar image of Los Angeles as a metropolis built for the automobile is crumbling. Traffic, air pollution, and sprawl motivated citizens to support urban rail as an alternative to driving, and the city has started to reinvent itself by developing compact neighborhoods adjacent to transit. As a result of pressure from local leaders, particularly with the election of Tom Bradley as mayor in 1973, the Los Angeles Metro Rail gradually took shape in the consummate car city. Railtown presents the history of this system by drawing on archival documents, contemporary news accounts, and interviews with many of the key players to provide critical behind-the-scenes accounts of the people and forces that shaped the system. Ethan Elkind brings this important story to life by showing how ambitious local leaders zealously advocated for rail transit and ultimately persuaded an ambivalent electorate and federal leaders to support their vision. Although Metro Rail is growing in ridership and political importance, with expansions in the pipeline, Elkind argues that local leaders will need to reform the rail planning and implementation process to avoid repeating past mistakes and to ensure that Metro Rail supports a burgeoning demand for transit-oriented neighborhoods in Los Angeles. This engaging history of Metro Rail provides lessons for how the American car-dominated cities of today can reinvent themselves as thriving railtowns of tomorrow.

Divided Loyalties

Whistle-blowing at BART
Author: Robert Morris Anderson,Robert Perrucci,Leon E. Trachtman
Publisher: Purdue University Press
ISBN: 9780931682094
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 397
View: 4528

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This study provides a detailed, in-depth analysis of a single incident rooted in the effort of a group of professional employees to serve the public welfare It reveals in microcosm the interplay of political forces, economic interests, personal ambition, organizational structure, and professional ethics that culminated in an act of whistle-blowing. The incident took place during the final construction phase of the Bay Area Rapid Transit System (BART), designed to be America's first attempt at space-age mass transportation. Three BART engineers, convinced of the lack of responsiveness of management to their concerns about the system's safety, were fired for insubordination and other organizational sins. Based upon repeated interviews with the engineers, with BART managers and directors, and with the professional societies involved, as well as upon an extensive body of documents and court depositions, legislative reports, media reports, and institutional memoranda. Divided Loyalties sets a theoretical context for the issues, traces the incident from its beginning, examines the aftermath of the engineers' dismissal, and concludes with a set of recommendations that should be considered by public and private organizations, professional associations, agencies of government, and individual professional employees.

Under Ground

Subways and Metros of the World
Author: Catherine Zerdoun
Publisher: Firefly Books
ISBN: 9781770858114
Category: Subway stations
Page: 208
View: 2037

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A visual tour of an amazing world beneath our streets.

Human Transit

How Clearer Thinking about Public Transit Can Enrich Our Communities and Our Lives
Author: Jarrett Walker
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 1610911741
Category: Transportation
Page: 235
View: 5167

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Public transit is a powerful tool for addressing a huge range of urban problems, including traffic congestion and economic development as well as climate change. But while many people support transit in the abstract, it's often hard to channel that support into good transit investments. Part of the problem is that transit debates attract many kinds of experts, who often talk past each other. Ordinary people listen to a little of this and decide that transit is impossible to figure out. Jarrett Walker believes that transit can be simple, if we focus first on the underlying geometry that all transit technologies share. In Human Transit, Walker supplies the basic tools, the critical questions, and the means to make smarter decisions about designing and implementing transit services. Human Transit explains the fundamental geometry of transit that shapes successful systems; the process for fitting technology to a particular community; and the local choices that lead to transit-friendly development. Whether you are in the field or simply a concerned citizen, here is an accessible guide to achieving successful public transit that will enrich any community.

The Great Society Subway

A History of the Washington Metro
Author: Zachary M. Schrag
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421415771
Category: History
Page: 376
View: 5215

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Whether trying to avoid the crawl along the Belt, the horrendous parking situation, or the stress induced by the ludicrous and inadequate street marking, Marylanders, Virginians, and folks from the nation's capital eschew the car and hop the Metro. Here Zachary M. Schrag tells the story of the Great Society Subway, from its foundings through to modern day, from Arlington to College Park, from Eisenhower to Marion Barry.

The Race Underground

Boston, New York, and the Incredible Rivalry That Built America’s First Subway
Author: Doug Most
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1466842008
Category: Transportation
Page: 416
View: 5934

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In the late nineteenth century, as cities like Boston and New York grew more congested, the streets became clogged with plodding, horse-drawn carts. When the great blizzard of 1888 crippled the entire northeast, a solution had to be found. Two brothers from one of the nation's great families-Henry Melville Whitney of Boston and William Collins Whitney of New York-pursued the dream of his city digging America's first subway, and the great race was on. The competition between Boston and New York played out in an era not unlike our own, one of economic upheaval, life-changing innovations, class warfare, bitter political tensions, and the question of America's place in the world.The Race Underground is peopled with the famous, like Boss Tweed, Grover Cleveland and Thomas Edison, and the not-so-famous, from brilliant engineers to the countless "sandhogs" who shoveled, hoisted and blasted their way into the earth's crust, sometimes losing their lives in the construction of the tunnels. Doug Most chronicles the science of the subway, looks at the centuries of fears people overcame about traveling underground and tells a story as exciting as any ever ripped from the pages of U.S. history. The Race Underground is a great American saga of two rival American cities, their rich, powerful and sometimes corrupt interests, and an invention that changed the lives of millions.

Street Fight

The Politics of Mobility in San Francisco
Author: Jason Henderson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781558499997
Category: Foreign Language Study
Page: 241
View: 7164

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Faced with intolerable congestion and noxious pollution, cities around the world are rethinking their reliance on automobiles. In the United States a loosely organized livability movement seeks to reduce car use by reconfiguring urban space into denser, transit-oriented, walkable forms, a development pattern also associated with smart growth and new urbanism. Through a detailed case study of San Francisco, Jason Henderson examines how this is not just a struggle over what type of transportation is best for the city, but a series of ideologically charged political fights over issues of street space, public policy, and social justice. Historically San Francisco has hosted many activist demonstrations over its streets, from the freeway revolts of the 1960s to the first Critical Mass bicycle rides decades later. Today the city's planning and advocacy establishment is changing zoning laws to limit the number of parking spaces, encouraging new car-free housing near transit stations, and applying "transit first" policies, such as restricted bus lanes. Yet Henderson warns that the city's accomplishments should not be romanticized. Despite significant gains by livability advocates, automobiles continue to dominate the streets, and the city's financially strained bus system is slow and often unreliable. Both optimistic and cautionary, Henderson argues that ideology must be understood as part of the struggle for sustainable cities and that three competing points of view -- progressive, neoliberal, and conservative -- have come to dominate the contemporary discourse about urban mobility. Consistent with its iconic role as an incubator of environmental, labor, civil rights, and peace movements, San Francisco offers a compelling example of how the debate over sustainable urban transportation may unfold both in the United States and globally.

Berkeley

A City in History
Author: Charles Wollenberg
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520253078
Category: History
Page: 224
View: 7217

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Provides an illustrated look at the city of Berkeley, California, as it took shape through America's changing times and, in turn, contributed to the history of the Bay Area, the Golden State, and the country as a whole. Original.

Engineering Ethics: Concepts and Cases


Author: Charles E. Harris, Jr.,Michael S. Pritchard,Michael J. Rabins,Ray James,Elaine Englehardt
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 133767074X
Category: Education
Page: 50
View: 8317

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Packed with examples pulled straight from recent headlines, ENGINEERING ETHICS, Sixth Edition, helps engineers understand the importance of their conduct as professionals as well as reflect on how their actions can affect the health, safety and welfare of the public and the environment. Numerous case studies give readers plenty of hands-on experience grappling with modern-day ethical dilemmas, while the book's proven and structured method for analysis walks readers step by step through ethical problem-solving techniques. It also offers practical application of the Engineering Code of Ethics and thorough coverage of critical moral reasoning, effective organizational communication, sustainability and economic development, risk management, ethical responsibilities, globalized standards for engineering and emerging challenges relating to evolving technology. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Streetfight

Handbook for an Urban Revolution
Author: Janette Sadik-Khan
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143128973
Category: Bicycle traffic flow
Page: 368
View: 7329

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As NYC's Transportation Commissioner, Janette Sadik-Khan managed the seemingly impossible and transformed the streets of one of the world s greatest, toughest cities into dynamic spaces safe for pedestrians and bikers. Her approach was dramatic and effective: she rewrote the rule book and involved local artists in a radical approach to city planning. In Streetfight, Sadik-Khan writes about the struggles she faced while making her approach work, and how it is now being implemented.

Practical Lessons from the Loma Prieta Earthquake


Author: N.A
Publisher: National Academies
ISBN: N.A
Category: Science
Page: 274
View: 5098

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The Loma Prieta earthquake struck the San Francisco area on October 17, 1989, causing 63 deaths and $10 billion worth of damage. This book reviews existing research on the Loma Prieta quake and draws from it practical lessons that could be applied to other earthquake-prone areas of the country. The volume contains seven keynote papers presented at a symposium on the earthquake and includes an overview written by the committee offering recommendations to improve seismic safety and earthquake awareness in parts of the country susceptible to earthquakes.

Under the Sidewalks of New York

The Story of the Greatest Subway System in the World
Author: Brian J. Cudahy
Publisher: Fordham Univ Press
ISBN: 9780823216185
Category: Transportation
Page: 194
View: 4975

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But as it is in no other city on earth, the subway of New York is intimately woven into the fabric and identity of the city itself

Transit Maps of the World


Author: Mark Ovenden
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143128493
Category: Transportation
Page: 176
View: 7255

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"Expanded and updated edition of the world's first collection of every urban train map on earth"--Front cover.

Troublemakers

Silicon Valley's Coming of Age
Author: Leslie Berlin
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 145165152X
Category: History
Page: 512
View: 4035

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The richly told narrative of the Silicon Valley generation that launched five major high-tech industries in seven years, laying the foundation for today’s technology-driven world. At a time when the five most valuable companies on the planet are high-tech firms and nearly half of Americans say they cannot live without their cell phones, Troublemakers reveals the untold story of how we got here. This is the gripping tale of seven exceptional men and women, pioneers of Silicon Valley in the 1970s and early 1980s. Together, they worked across generations, industries, and companies to bring technology from Pentagon offices and university laboratories to the rest of us. In doing so, they changed the world. In Troublemakers, historian Leslie Berlin introduces the people and stories behind the birth of the Internet and the microprocessor, as well as Apple, Atari, Genentech, Xerox PARC, ROLM, ASK, and the iconic venture capital firms Sequoia Capital and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. In the space of only seven years and thirty-five miles, five major industries—personal computing, video games, biotechnology, modern venture capital, and advanced semiconductor logic—were born. During these same years, the first ARPANET transmission came into a Stanford lab, the university began licensing faculty innovations to businesses, and the Silicon Valley tech community began mobilizing to develop the lobbying clout and influence that have become critical components of modern American politics. In other words, these were the years when one of the most powerful pillars of our modern innovation and political systems was first erected. Featured among well-known Silicon Valley innovators like Steve Jobs, Regis McKenna, Larry Ellison, and Don Valentine are Mike Markkula, the underappreciated chairman of Apple who owned one-third of the company; Bob Taylor, who kick-started the Arpanet and masterminded the personal computer; software entrepreneur Sandra Kurtzig, the first woman to take a technology company public; Bob Swanson, the cofounder of Genentech; Al Alcorn, the Atari engineer behind the first wildly successful video game; Fawn Alvarez, who rose from an assembler on a factory line to the executive suite; and Niels Reimers, the Stanford administrator who changed how university innovations reach the public. Together, these troublemakers rewrote the rules and invented the future.

Urban Elites and Mass Transportation

The Dialectics of Power
Author: J. Allen Whitt
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400857457
Category: Transportation
Page: 246
View: 4770

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In an unusually systematic approach to the study of urban politics, this study compares three different models of political power to see which can best explain the development of the Bay Area Rapid Transit System in San Francisco and the attempts of Los Angeles to build a comparable system. Originally published in 1982. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The Help


Author: Kathryn Stockett
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0425245136
Category: Fiction
Page: 534
View: 8770

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Limited and persecuted by racial divides in 1962 Jackson, Mississippi, three women, including an African-American maid, her sassy and chronically unemployed friend and a recently graduated white woman, team up for a clandestine project against a backdrop of the budding civil rights era. Includes reading-group guide. Reissue. A #1 best-selling novel.

A Brief History of American Literature


Author: Richard Gray
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781444392463
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 420
View: 8374

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A Brief History of American Literature offers students and general readers a concise and up-to-date history of the full range of American writing from its origins until the present day. Represents the only up-to-date concise history of American literature Covers fiction, poetry, drama and non-fiction, as well as looking at other forms of literature including folktales, spirituals, the detective story, the thriller and science fiction Considers how our understanding of American literature has changed over the past twenty years Offers students an abridged version of History of American Literature, a book widely considered the standard survey text Provides an invaluable introduction to the subject for students of American literature, American studies and all those interested in the literature and culture of the United States

Berkeley Walks

Expanded and Updated Edition
Author: Robert E. Johnson,Janet L. Byron
Publisher: Roaring Forties Press
ISBN: 1938901770
Category: Travel
Page: N.A
View: 4512

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This expanded and updated edition of a local best-seller offers more revealing rambles through one of America’s most fascinating cities. Berkeley Walks celebrates the things that make Berkeley such a wonderful walking city—diverse architecture, panoramic views, tree-lined neighborhoods, unusual gardens, secret pathways, hidden parks, and vibrant street life. Historical surprises and architectural delights include the apartment building from which Patty Hearst was kidnapped; Ted Kaczynski’s home before he became the Unabomber; and the residences of Nobel laureates and literary Berkeleyans such as Thornton Wilder, Ann Rice, and Philip K. Dick. Bob Johnson and Janet Byron—longtime city residents and tour guides—have added 3 new walks, extensively revised 6 others, and updated all the rest. These 21 walks showcase the many elements that make Berkeley’s neighborhoods, shopping districts, and academic areas such fun to explore. Visitors will discover a vibrant community beyond the University of California campus borders; locals will be surprised and charmed by the treasures in their own backyards. Highlights of the book include features on architects such as John Galen Howard, Bernard Maybeck, and Julia Morgan; more than 100 archival and original photos; and detailed maps with hundreds of points of interest on these easy-to-follow, self-guided walking tours.