What Is Archaeology?

An Essay on the Nature of Archaeological Research
Author: Paul Courbin
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226116563
Category: Social Science
Page: 197
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Paul Courbin puts forward a penetrating and eloquent critique of the New Archeology, a movement of primarily American and British archaeologists that began in the 1960s and continues today. The New Archeologists dropped the "ae" spelling, symbolizing their intent to put the field on a modern and scientific footing. They questioned the bases, the objectives, and consequently the methods of traditional archaeology. Courbin examines this movement, its latent philosophy, its methods and their application, its theories, and its results. He declares that the record shows a devastating failure. The New Archeologists, he contends, may have developed scientific hypotheses, but in most cases they failed to carry out what is necessary to test their theories, thus contradicting the very goals they had set for the discipline. Reevaluating the field as a whole, Courbin asks, What is archaeology? He distinguishes it from such related fields as history and anthropology, emphatically arguing that the primary task of archaeology is what the archaeologist alone can accomplish: the establishment of facts—stratigraphies, time sequences, and identification tools, bones, potsherds, and so on. When archaeological findings lead to historical or anthropological conclusions, as they very often do, archaeologists must be aware that this involves a specific change in their work; they are no longer archaeologists proper. The archaeologist's work, Courbin stresses, is not a humble auxiliary of anthropology or history, but the foundation upon which historians and anthropologists of ancient civilizations will build and without which their theories cannot but collapse. What Is Archaeology? was originally published in French in 1982.

A Future for Archaeology

The Past in the Present
Author: Robert Layton,Stephen Shennan,Peter G. Stone
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9781844721269
Category: Archaeology
Page: 251
View: 9013

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The essays in this book look back at some of the most important events where a role for an archaeology concerned with the past in the present first emerged and look forward to the practical and theoretical issues now central to a socially engaged discipline and shaping its future.

Archaeology

The Discipline of Things
Author: Bjørnar Olsen
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520274172
Category: Social Science
Page: 255
View: 6802

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"This book exhorts the reader to embrace the materiality of archaeology by recognizing how every step in the discipline's scientific processes involves interaction with myriad physical artifacts, ranging from the camel-hair brush to profile drawings to virtual reality imaging. At the same time, the reader is taken on a phenomenological journey into various pasts, immersed in the lives of peoples from other times, compelled to engage their senses with the sights, smells, and noises of the publics and places whose remains they study. This is a refreshingly original and provocative look at the meaning of the material culture that lies at the foundation of the archaeological discipline."--Michael Brian Schiffer, author of The Material Life of Human Beings "This volume is a radical call to fundamentally rethink the ontology, profession, and practice of archaeology. The authors present a closely reasoned, epistemologically sound argument for why archaeology should be considered the discipline of things, rather than its more commonplace definition as the study of the human past through material traces. All scholars and students of archaeology will need to read and contemplate this thought-provoking book."--Wendy Ashmore, Professor of Anthropology, UC Riverside "A broad, illuminating, and well-researched overview of theoretical problems pertaining to archaeology. The authors make a calm defense of the role of objects against tedious claims of 'fetishism.'"--Graham Harman, author of The Quadruple Object

Archaeology

Discovering the Past
Author: John Orna-Ornstein
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195219090
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 48
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Archaeologists are detectives who use science and history to find out how people lived in the past. Archaeology takes you to archaeological digs all over the world to help answer such questions as "Why is the past often buried underground?" and "How do archaeologists know where to dig?"

Sculpture and Archaeology


Author: Paul Bonaventura,Andrew Jones
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 9780754658313
Category: Art
Page: 221
View: 428

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In recent years the intersections between art history and archaeology have become the focus of critical analysis by both disciplines. Contemporary sculpture has played a key role in this dialogue. These essays by art historians, archaeologists and artists, take the intersection between sculpture and archaeology as the prelude for analysis, examining the metaphorical and conceptual role of archaeology as subject matter for sculptors, and the significance of sculpture as a three-dimensional medium for exploring historical attitudes to archaeology.

Archaeology and World Religion


Author: Timothy Insoll
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415221559
Category: Religion
Page: 226
View: 3766

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Archaeology and World Religion is an important new work, being the first to examine these two vast topics together. The volume explores the relationship between, and the contribution archaeology can make to the study of 'World Religions'. The contributors consider a number of questions: * can religious (sacred) texts be treated as historical documents, or do they merit special treatment? * Does archaeology with its emphasis on material culture dispel notions of the ideal/divine? * Does the study of archaeology and religion lead to differing interpretations of the same event? * In what ways does the notion of a uniform religious identity exist and is this recognisable in the archaeological record? Clearly written and up-to-date, this volume will be an indispensable research tool for academics and specialists in these fields.

Archaeology

The Widening Debate
Author: Professor of European Archaeology Barry Cunliffe,Pro-Provost European Affairs and Professor of History Wendy Davies
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780197262559
Category: Religion
Page: 627
View: 711

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Twenty-six leading scholars from around the world come together here to show how archaeology has transformed itself over the last hundred years from a pursuit deeply rooted in the classical tradition to a discipline spanning the humanities and the sciences, yet still widely accessible to the public at large. The result is a remarkable overview of world archaeology, focusing on new and unexpected themes at the cutting edge of the discipline.

Archaeology

The Key Concepts
Author: Colin Renfrew,Paul G. Bahn
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415317573
Category: Social Science
Page: 298
View: 5814

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This invaluable resource provides an up-to-date and comprehensive survey of key ideas in archaeology and their impact on archaeological thinking and method. Featuring over fifty detailed entries by international experts, the book offers definitions of key terms, explaining their origin and development. Entries also feature guides to further reading and extensive cross-referencing. Archaeology: The Key Concepts is the ideal reference guide for students, teachers and anyone with an interest in archaeology.

Archaeology

The Comic
Author: Johannes H. N. Loubser
Publisher: Rowman Altamira
ISBN: 9780759103818
Category: Art
Page: 169
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A brief introduction to contemporary archaeology in comic book format.

The Archaeology of the Roman Economy


Author: Kevin Greene
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520074019
Category: History
Page: 192
View: 6717

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Kevin Greene shows how archaeology can help provide a more balanced view of the Roman economy by informing the classical historian about geographical areas and classes of society that received little attention from the largely aristocratic classical writers whose work survives.

Handbook of Gender in Archaeology


Author: Sarah M. Nelson,Sarah Nelson
Publisher: Rowman Altamira
ISBN: 9780759106789
Category: Social Science
Page: 913
View: 5056

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First reference work to explore the research on gender in archaeology.

Archaeology

The Basics
Author: Clive Gamble
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415346597
Category: Social Science
Page: 239
View: 6259

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A must for anyone considering the study of archaeology, designed to provide the reader with everything they should know when embarking on an archaeological course, whether A Level or first year undergraduate.

ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE MEDIA


Author: Timothy Clack,Marcus Brittain
Publisher: Left Coast Press
ISBN: 1598742345
Category: Social Science
Page: 323
View: 1959

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The public's fascination with archaeology has meant that archaeologists have had to deal with media more regularly than other scholarly disciplines. In this volume, a group of archaeologists address a wide range of questions in this intersection of fields.

The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial


Author: Sarah Tarlow,Liv Nilsson Stutz
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0199569061
Category: Social Science
Page: 872
View: 7348

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This Handbook reviews the state of mortuary archaeology and its practice with forty-four chapters focusing on the history of the discipline and its current scientific techniques and methods. Written by leading scholars in the field, it derives its examples and case studies from a wide range of time periods and geographical areas.

Archaeology

A Brief Introduction
Author: Brian M. Fagan
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131735012X
Category: Social Science
Page: 384
View: 6340

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Method and Theory in Archaeology Archaeology: A Brief Introduction is an introduction to the fundamental principles of method and theory in archaeology, exposing students to archaeology as a career. The text begins by covering the goals of archaeology, and then moves on to consider the basic concepts of culture, time, and space, by discussing the finding and excavation of archaeological sites. By providing a distinct emphasis on the ethics behind archaeology, and how we should act as stewards of the finite records of the human past, Archaeology: A Brief Introduction continues to be a book with a truly international perspective, not simply focusing on North America or Europe. Teaching and Learning Experience Improve Critical Thinking - Archaeology: A Brief Introduction's "Archaeology and You" chapter provides students with career advice in an era when archaeology is transitioning from predominantly academic to professional. Engage Students - Each chapter within Archaeology: A Brief Introduction highlights important finds that have shaped our archaeological perspective, and a global perspective that shows students that archaeology is the most global of all sciences, encompassing all of humanity.

Archaeology

What it Is, where it Is, and how to Do it
Author: Paul Wilkinson
Publisher: Archaeopress
ISBN: 9781905739004
Category: Social Science
Page: 104
View: 4498

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"This book has been written to be used by newcomers to archaeology in the field and explains the techniques and methods that will help you to understand and record the past." -- back cover.

A Dictionary of Archaeology


Author: Ian Shaw
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780631235835
Category: History
Page: 640
View: 3567

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This dictionary provides those studying or working in archaeology with a complete reference to the field. The entries, which range from key-word definitions to longer articles, convey the challenges, ambiguities and theoretical context of archaeology as well as the surveyed and excavated data. The dictionary is based on the premise that archaeology is a process rather than simply a body of knowledge, and includes contributions from more than forty of the world's leading archaeologists. Unlike other dictionaries of archaeology, this volume provides comprehensive coverage of recent archaeological theory together with examples of practical applications and cross-references to site entries. "The Dictionary" also incorporates concepts and movements from adjacent fields such as anthropology, sociology, philosophy and human biology. There are also numerous entries on previously neglected areas such as China, Japan and Oceania. The bibliographies that follow virtually every entry enable the reader to easily locate primary or most recent sources.

The Archaeology of Time


Author: Gavin Lucas
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415311977
Category: Social Science
Page: 150
View: 9934

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Drawing on a wide range of archaeological examples from a variety of regions and periods, this book is an introduction not just to the issues of chronology and dating, but time as a theoretical concept and how this is understood and employed in contemporary archaeology.

The Archaeology of Colonialism


Author: Claire L. Lyons,John K. Papadopoulos
Publisher: Getty Publications
ISBN: 9780892366354
Category: Architecture
Page: 284
View: 8573

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The Archaeology of Colonialism demonstrates how artifacts are not only the residue of social interaction but also instrumental in shaping identities and communities. Claire Lyons and John Papadopoulos summarize the complex issues addressed by this collection of essays. Four case studies illustrate the use of archaeological artifacts to reconstruct social structures. They include ceramic objects from Mesopotamian colonists in fourth-millennium Anatolia; the Greek influence on early Iberian sculpture and language; the influence of architecture on the West African coast; and settlements across Punic Sardinia that indicate the blending of cultures. The remaining essays look at the roles myth, ritual, and religion played in forming colonial identities. In particular, they discuss the cultural middle ground established among Greeks and Etruscans; clothing as an instrument of European colonialism in nineteenth-century Oceania; sixteenth-century Andean urban planning and kinship relations; and the Dutch East India Company settlement at the Cape of Good Hope.