Archaeology in South Carolina

Exploring the Hidden Heritage of the Palmetto State
Author: Adam King
Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press
ISBN: 1611176093
Category: History
Page: 296
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Adam King’s Archaeology in South Carolina contains an overview of the fascinating archaeological research currently ongoing in the Palmetto state featuring essays by twenty scholars studying South Carolina’s past through archaeological research. The scholarly contributions are enhanced by more than one hundred black and white and thirty-eight color images of some of the most important and interesting sites and artifacts found in the state. South Carolina has an extraordinarily rich history encompassing the first human habitation of North America to the lives of people at the dawn of the modern era. King begins the anthology with the basic hows and whys of archeology and introduces readers to the current issues influencing the field of research. The contributors are all recognized experts from universities, state agencies, and private consulting firms, reflecting the diversity of people and institutions that engage in archaeology. The volume begins with investigations of some of the earliest Paleo-Indian and Native American cultures that thrived in South Carolina, including work at the Topper Site along the Savannah River. Other essays explore the creation of early communities at the Stallings Island site, the emergence of large and complex Native American polities before the coming of Europeans,the impact of the coming of European settlers on Native American groups along the Savannah River, and the archaeology of the Yamassee, apeople whose history is tightly bound to the emerging European society. The focus then shifts to Euro-Americans with an examination of a long-term project seeking to understand George Galphin’s trading post established on the Savannah River in the eighteenth century. A discussion of Middleburg Plantation, one of the oldest plantation houses in the South Carolina lowcountry, is followed by a fascinating glimpse into how the city of Charleston and the lives of its inhabitants changed during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Essays on underwater archaeological research cover several Civil War-era vessels located in Winyah Bay near Georgetown and Station Creek near Beaufort, as well as one of the most famous Civil War naval vessels—the H.L. Hunley. The volume concludes with the recollections of a life spent in the field by South Carolina’s preeminent historical archaeologist Stanley South, now retired from the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of South Carolina.

Investigating the Ordinary

Everyday Matters in Southeast Archaeology
Author: Sarah E. Price,Philip J. Carr
Publisher: Florida Museum of Natural Hist
ISBN: 9781683400219
Category: Social Science
Page: 290
View: 1522

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Centering the archaeological discussion on the everyday affords a vantage point from which to think about the artifacts and conceptions of the past in new ways. Although not written specifically for the non-archaeological audience, this volume serves as an engaging entry into archaeological thinking through exploration of various times and topics.

The Savannah River Chiefdoms

Political Change in the Late Prehistoric Southeast
Author: David G. Anderson
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817307257
Category: History
Page: 459
View: 5224

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This volume explores political change in chiefdoms, specifically how complex chiefdoms emerge and collapse, and how this process—called cycling—can be examined using archaeological, ethnohistoric, paleoclimatic, paleosubsistence, and physical anthropological data. The focus for the research is the prehistoric and initial contact-era Mississippian chiefdoms of the Southeastern United States, specifically the societies occupying the Savannah River basin from ca. A.D. 1000 to 1600. This regional focus and the multidisciplinary nature of the investigation provide a solid introduction to the Southeastern Mississippian archaeological record and the study of cultural evolution in general.

The Archaeology and History of the Native Georgia Tribes


Author: Max E. White
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780813025766
Category: History
Page: 149
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The story of Georgia’s Indians from elephant hunts to the European invasion. Spanning 12,000 years, this scientifically accurate and very readable book guides readers through the prehistoric and historic archaeological evidence left by Georgia’s native peoples. It is the only comprehensive, up-to-date, and text-based overview of its kind in print. Drawing on an extensive body of archaeological and historical data, White traces Native American cultural development and accomplishment over the millennia preceding the establishment of Georgia as a colony and state. Each chapter opens with a vivid fictional vignette transporting the reader to a past culture and setting the scene for the narrative that follows. From hunting giant buffalo and elephants to attempts in the 1700s and 1800s to maintain tribal integrity in the face of European and Euro-American violence and threats, White takes the reader on an archaeologically based tour of the land that today is Georgia. Evidence from selected archaeological sites and projects is woven into the narrative, and insets supplement the main text to highlight informative passages from archaeological reports and historical documents. A generous number of photographs, maps, and illustrations aid the reader in identifying artifacts and testify to the artistic abilities of these indigenous peoples of Georgia.

Early Pottery in the Southeast

Tradition and Innovation in Cooking Technology
Author: Kenneth E. Sassaman
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 081738426X
Category: Art
Page: 304
View: 9054

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A Dan Josselyn Memorial Publication Among southeastern Indians pottery was an innovation that enhanced the economic value of native foods and the efficiency of food preparation. But even though pottery was available in the Southeast as early as 4,500 years ago, it took nearly two millenia before it was widely used. Why would an innovation of such economic value take so long to be adopted? The answer lies in the social and political contexts of traditional cooking technology. Sassaman's book questions the value of using technological traits alone to mark temporal and spatial boundaries of prehistoric cultures and shows how social process shapes the prehistoric archaeological record.

Follow the Moon Home

A Tale of One Idea, Twenty Kids, and a Hundred Sea Turtles
Author: Philippe Cousteau,Deborah Hopkinson
Publisher: Chronicle Books
ISBN: 1452158096
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 48
View: 7667

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Acclaimed activist Philippe Cousteau and renowned author Deborah Hopkinson team up to offer a story of the powerful difference young people can make in the world. Meet Viv, who has a new home and a new school by the sea, and follow her as she finds her way in a new place and helps bring together a whole community to save the sea turtles of the South Carolina coast. Plus, this is the fixed format version, which looks almost identical to the print edition.

Ramblings of a Lowcountry Game Warden

A Memoir
Author: Ben McC. Moïse
Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press
ISBN: 1611171180
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 4060

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Ben McC. Moïse served with distinction as a South Carolina game warden for nearly a quarter century, patrolling the coastal woods and waters of the Palmetto State. In this colorful career-spanning memoir, the cigar-chomping, ticket-writing scourge of lowcountry fish-and-game-law violators chronicles grueling stakeouts, complex trials, hair-raising adventures, and daily interactions with a host of outrageous personalities. With a lawman's eye for fine details, a conservationist's nose for the aroma of pluff mud, and a seasoned storyteller's ear for the rhythms of a good southern yarn, Moïse recounts his stout-hearted and steadfast efforts to protect the lowcountry landscape and bring to justice those who would run roughshod over fish and game laws on the Carolina coast. Along the way he paints a vivid portrait of evolving attitudes and changing regulations governing coastal conservation.

Sunrise on the Santee

A Memoir of Waterfowling in South Carolina
Author: Julius M. Reynolds
Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press
ISBN: 9781570034541
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 224
View: 4160

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A duck hunter gets his limit of cherished memories For more than half a century, Julius M. Reynolds, Jr. has hunted waterfowl, and the Santee lakes of South Carolina have been his sporting paradise. Early mornings, cold duck blinds, and sunrises on the Santee compose some of his most prized memories. Reynolds has lived on both sides of the lakes and has roamed them from the Santee delta to the Pinopolis powerhouse. He has witnessed both the glory days and the decline of duck hunting in South Carolina. With this heartfelt memoir, Reynolds recalls his best hunting stories, shares his knowledge of waterfowling, and chronicles recent dramatic changes in his beloved sport. Describing himself as a Sumter boy who grew up chasing ducks in Pocotaliago Swamp and from one end of the lake to the other, Reynolds takes readers into the Santee's best duck hunting areas - from Cane Branch, Billup's Slough, and Line Island, all located around Jack's Creek, to McGirt's Lake, Otter Flat, Riser's Old River, Pine Island Creek, Broadwater, Indigo Flat, and Fuller's Earth Creek, his favorite hunting spots in the Santee Swamp. He tells stories of memorable trips, colorful South Carolina sportsmen, favor

Wild South Carolina

A Field Guide to Parks, Preserves and Special Places
Author: Liesel Hamilton,Susan Hamilton
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781938235252
Category: Nature
Page: N.A
View: 8587

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From mountainous rainforests to isolated barrier islands, the Palmetto State is a remarkable place to experience plant and animal life. Organized by region and illustrated with more than 150 color photographs, Wild South Carolina presents handpicked tours of 37 special parks, wildlife refuges, heritage preserves, and other public lands. Hike, bike or ride a horse.

The Best Gun in the World

George Woodward Morse and the South Carolina State Military Works
Author: Robert S. Seigler
Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press
ISBN: 1611177936
Category: History
Page: 296
View: 9040

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A year after seceding from the Union, South Carolina and the Confederate States government faced the daunting challenge of equipping soldiers with weapons, ammunition, and other military implements during the American Civil War. In The Best Gun in the World, Robert S. Seigler explains how South Carolina created its own armory and then enlisted the help of a weapons technology inventor to meet the demand. Seigler mined state and federal factory records, national and state archives, and U.S. patents for detailed information on weapons production, the salaries and status of free and enslaved employees, and other financial records to reveal an interesting, distinctive story of technological innovation and industrialization in South Carolina. George Woodward Morse, originally from New Hampshire, was a machinist and firearms innovator, who settled in Louisiana in the 1840s. He invented a reliable breechloading firearm in the mid-1850s to replace muzzleloaders that were ubiquitous throughout the world. Essential to the successful operation of any breechloader was its ammunition, and Morse perfected the first metallic, center-fire, pre-primed cartridge, his most notable contribution to the development of modern firearms. The U.S. War Department tested Morse rifles and cartridges prior to the beginning of the Civil War and contracted with the inventor to produce the weapons at Harpers Ferry Armory. However, when the war began, Morse, a slave-holding plantation owner, determined that he could sell more of his guns in the South. The South Carolina State Military Works originally designed to cast cannon, produced Morse’s carbine and modified muskets, brass cartridges, cartridge boxes, and other military accoutrements. The armory ultimately produced only about 1,350 Morse firearms. For the next twenty years, Morse sought to regain his legacy as the inventor of the center-fire brass cartridges that are today standard ammunition for military and sporting firearms.

Signs of Power

The Rise of Cultural Complexity in the Southeast
Author: Jon L. Gibson,Philip J. Carr
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817350853
Category: History
Page: 383
View: 6464

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By focusing on the first instances of mound building, pottery making, fancy polished stone and bone, as well as specialized chipped stone, artifacts, and their widespread exchange, this book explores the sources of power and organization among Archaic societies.

Materializing Colonial Encounters

Archaeologies of African Experience
Author: François G. Richard
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1493926330
Category: Social Science
Page: 307
View: 1352

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This volume investigates the material production and expression of colonial experiences in Africa. It combines archaeological, historical, and ethnographic sources to explore the diverse pathways, practices, and projects constructed by Africans in their engagement with the forces of colonial modernity and capitalism. This volume is situated in ongoing debates in archaeological and anthropological approaches to materiality. In this respect, it seeks to target archaeologists interested in the conceptual issues provoked by colonial enfoldments. It is also concerned with increasing the visibility of relevant African archaeological literature to scholars of colonialism and imperialism laboring in other fields. This book brings together an array of junior and senior scholars, whose contributions represent a rich sample of the vibrant archaeological research conducted in Africa today, blending conceptual inspiration with robust fieldwork. The chapters target a variety of cultural, historical, and colonial settings. They are driven by a plurality of perspectives, but they are bound by a shared commitment to postcolonial, critical, and material culture theories. While this book focuses on western and southern Africa – the sub-regions that boast the deepest traditions of historical archaeological research in the continent – attention was also placed on including case-studies from traditionally less well-represented areas (East African and Swahili coasts, Madagascar), whose material pasts are nevertheless essential to a wider comprehension of variability and comparability of ‘modern’ colonial conditions. Consequently, this volume lends a unique wide-ranging look at African experiences across the tangle of imperial geographies on the continent, with case-studies focusing on Anglophone, Francophone, and Dutch-speaking contexts. This volume is an exciting opportunity to present this work to wider audiences and foster conversations with a wide community of scholars about the material fashioning of colonial life, relations, and configurations of power.

From Statehouse to Courthouse

An Architectural History of South Carolina's Colonial Capitol and Charleston County Courthouse
Author: Carl Lounsbury
Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press
ISBN: 9781570033780
Category: Architecture
Page: 113
View: 3303

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This text traces the historical and architectural development of one of the most important but least understood buildings constructed in 18th-century South Carolina.

Etowah

The Political History of a Chiefdom Capital
Author: Adam King
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817312242
Category: History
Page: 178
View: 5574

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A Dan Josselyn Memorial Publication This is a detailed reconstruction of the waxing and waning of political fortunes among the chiefly elites at an important center of the prehistoric world. At the time the first Europeans arrived in the New World, thousands of earthen platform mounds dotted the landscape of eastern North America. Only a few of the mound sites have survived the ravages of time and the devastation of pilferers; one of these valuable monuments is Etowah, located near Cartersville in northern Georgia. Over a period of more than 100 years, excavations of the site’s six mounds, and in particular Mound C, have yielded a wealth of artifacts, including marble statues, copper embossed plates, ceremonial items, and personal adornments. These objects indicate an extensive trading network between Mississippian centers and confirm contact with Spanish conquistadores near Etowah in the mid-1500s. Adam King has analyzed the architecture and artifacts of Etowah and deduced its vital role in the prehistory of the area. He advances a plausible historical sequence and a model for the ancient town's complex political structure. The chiefdom society relied upon institutional social ranking, permanent political offices, religious ideology, a redistribution of goods and services, and the willing support of the constituent population. King reveals strategies used by the paramount chiefs to maintain their sources of power and to control changes in the social organization. Elite alliances did not necessarily involve the extreme asymmetry of political domination and tribute extraction. King's use of ceramic assemblages recovered from Etowah to determine the occupation history and the construction sequence of public facilities (mounds and plazas) at the center is significant. This fresh interpretation of the Etowah site places it in a contemporary social and political context with other Mississippian cultures. It is a one-volume sourcebook for the Etowah polity and its neighbors and will, therefore, command an eager audience of scholars and generalists.

We Gambled Everything

The Life and Times of an Oilman
Author: Arne Nielsen
Publisher: University of Alberta
ISBN: 0888645988
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 273
View: 9898

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"We gambled everything-our careers, our fortunes, the future of our nation-and every day brought new discoveries. It was like living on a frontier."-Arne Nielsen The memoir of Canadian petroleum industry leader Arne Nielsen is not a conventional business biography. During his six decades in the business, he witnessed critical events in the oil industry that influenced Canada's economic history. From rain-soaked tents on the Arctic barren land to the luxurious New York offices of a multinational oil company, Arne Nielsen's expansive knowledge of geology and the oil industry made him one of the most influential and well-known figures of his time. His memoir provides crucial details and unique perspectives on events that will be of interest to the next generation of oil industry executives as well as to consumers, economists, and ecologists.

Southeastern Ceremonial Complex

Chronology, Content, Contest
Author: Adam King
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817354093
Category: History
Page: 305
View: 1974

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A timely, comprehensive reevaluation of the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex. One of the most venerable concepts in Southeastern archaeology is that of the Southern Cult. The idea has its roots in the intensely productive decade (archaeologically) of the 1930s and is fundamentally tied to yet another venerable concept—Mississippian culture. The last comprehensive study of the melding of these two concepts into the term Southeastern Ceremonial Complex (SECC) is more than two decades old, yet our understanding of the objects, themes, and artistic styles associated with the SECC have changed a great deal. New primary data have come to light that bear directly on the complex, requiring a thorough reanalysis of both concepts and dating. Recent publications have ignited many debates about the dating and the nature of the SECC. This work presents new data and new ideas on the temporal and social contexts, artistic styles, and symbolic themes included in the complex. It also demonstrates that engraved shell gorgets, along with other SECC materials, were produced before A.D. 1400.

Charleston

An Archaeology of Life in a Coastal Community
Author: Martha A. Zierden,Elizabeth Jean Reitz,Joseph P. Riley
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780813062907
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 5266

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The authors explore historic buildings and maritime landscape of Charleston SC. They consider the residential, commercial, and public life in the city, examining ruins of taverns, markets, townhouses, and small residences as well as the famous Slave Market and the lesser-known shell mound.

Exploring Southeastern Archaeology


Author: Patricia Galloway,Evan Peacock
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 1626746893
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 5530

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This volume includes original scholarship on a wide array of current archaeological research across the South. One essay explores the effects of climate on early cultures in Mississippi. Contributors reveal the production and distribution of stone effigy beads, which were centered in southwest Mississippi some 5,000 years ago, and trace contact between different parts of the prehistoric Southeast as seen in the distribution of clay cooking balls. Researchers explore small, enigmatic sites in the hill country of northern Mississippi now marked by scatters of broken pottery and a large, seemingly isolated “platform” mound in Calhoun County. Pieces describe a mound group in Chickasaw County built by early agriculturalists who subsequently abandoned the area and a similar prehistoric abandonment event in Winston and Choctaw Counties. A large pottery collection from the famous Anna Mounds site in Adams County, excavations at a Chickasaw Indian site in Lee County, camps and works of the Civilian Conservation Corps in the pine hill country of southern Mississippi, and the history of logging in the Mississippi Delta all yield abundant, new understandings of the past. Overview papers include a retrospective on archaeology in the National Forests of north Mississippi, a new look at a number of mound sites in the lower Mississippi Delta, and a study of how communities of learning in field archaeology are built, with prominent archaeologist Samuel O. Brookes’s achievements as a focal point. History buffs, artifact enthusiasts, students, and professionals all will find something of interest in this book, which opens new doors on the prehistory and history of Mississippi.