Anthropology

The Exploration of Human Diversity, with Living Anthropology Student CD and PowerWeb
Author: Conrad Phillip Kottak
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages
ISBN: 9780073137476
Category: Social Science
Page: 864
View: 4615

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The new edition of Kottak's best selling text continues to offer a holistic introduction to anthropology that approaches the course from a four-field perspective. To emphasize anthropology's integrated and comparative nature, "Bringing It All Together" essays show how anthropology's sub-fields and dimensions combine to interpret and explain a common topic. Another distinctive feature, "Understanding Ourselves," illustrates the relevance of anthropological facts and theories to students' everyday lives. In addition, every new copy of the eleventh edition is packaged free with a new student CD-ROM as well as PowerWeb!

Anthropology: The Exploration of Human Diversity

The Exploration of Human Diversity
Author: Conrad Kottak
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages
ISBN: 9780073405360
Category: Social Science
Page: 704
View: 753

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A recent National Academy of Sciences inductee, Conrad Phillip Kottak offers an up-to-date holistic introduction to general anthropology from the four-field perspective. Kottak emphasizes why anthropology should matter to students and how students can use anthropology to better understand themselves. "Bringing It All Together" essays found on the online learning center demonstrate the integrated and comparative nature of anthropology. New "Through the Eyes of Others" essays offer the perspectives of foreign students and recent graduates who present their own cultures of origin in contrast with contemporary American culture. Thought-provoking questions now begin each chapter to highlight key themes and spark discussions and critical thinking.

Anthropology

Appreciating Human Diversity
Author: Conrad Kottak
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Higher Education
ISBN: 0077780094
Category: Social Science
Page: 576
View: 8880

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A leading name in anthropology, Conrad Philip Kottak continues to define student learning in the general anthropology course. Anthropology: Appreciating Human Diversity offers an up-to-date holistic introduction to general anthropology from the four-field perspective. Key themes of appreciating the experiences students bring to the classroom, appreciating human diversity, and appreciating the field of anthropology are showcased throughout the text. Focusing on an increasingly interconnected world, the new Focus on Globalization essays examine topics as diverse as tourism in the ancient and modern worlds, global disease pandemics, world events (including the Olympics and the World Cup), and the expansion of international finance and branding.

Anthropology, The Exploration of Human Diversity


Author: CTI Reviews
Publisher: Cram101 Textbook Reviews
ISBN: 1619069741
Category: Education
Page: 80
View: 1392

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Facts101 is your complete guide to Anthropology, The Exploration of Human Diversity. In this book, you will learn topics such as Ethics and Methods in Physical Anthropology and Arcaeology, Evolution and Genetics, Human Variation and Adaptation, and The Primates plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.

Humankind Evolving

An Exploration of the Origins of Human Diversity
Author: Roberto A. Frisancho,A. Roberto Frisancho
Publisher: Kendall Hunt Publishing Company
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 415
View: 1940

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Dancing Skeletons

Life and Death in West Africa, 20th Anniversary Edition
Author: Katherine A. Dettwyler
Publisher: Waveland Press
ISBN: 1478611588
Category: Social Science
Page: 208
View: 5495

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One of the most widely used ethnographies published in the last twenty years, this Margaret Mead Award winner has been used as required reading at more than 600 colleges and universities. This personal account by a biocultural anthropologist illuminates not-soon-forgotten messages involving the sobering aspects of fieldwork among malnourished children in West Africa. With nutritional anthropology at its core, Dancing Skeletons presents informal, engaging, and oftentimes dramatic stories that relate the author’s experiences conducting research on infant feeding and health in Mali. Through fascinating vignettes and honest, vivid descriptions, Dettwyler explores such diverse topics as ethnocentrism, culture shock, population control, breastfeeding, child care, the meaning of disability and child death in different cultures, female circumcision, women’s roles in patrilineal societies, the dangers of fieldwork, and facing emotionally draining realities. Readers will laugh and cry as they meet the author’s friends and informants, follow her through a series of encounters with both peri-urban and rural Bambara culture, and struggle with her as she attempts to reconcile her very different roles as objective ethnographer, subjective friend, and mother in the field. The 20th Anniversary Edition includes a 13-page “Q&A with the Author” in which Dettwyler responds to typical questions she has received individually from students who have been assigned Dancing Skeletons as well as audience questions at lectures on various campuses. The new 23-page “Update on Mali, 2013” chapter is a factual update about economic and health conditions in Mali as well as a brief summary of the recent political unrest.

Engaging Anthropological Theory

A Social and Political History
Author: Mark Moberg
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351805193
Category: Social Science
Page: 442
View: 874

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This fully revised second edition of Mark Moberg's lively book offers a fresh look at the history of anthropological theory. Covering key concepts and theorists, Engaging Anthropological Theory examines the historical context of anthropological ideas and the contested nature of anthropology itself. Anthropological ideas regarding human diversity have always been rooted in the socio-political conditions in which they arose and exploring them in context helps students understand how and why they evolved, and how theory relates to life and society. Illustrated throughout, this engaging text moves away from the dry recitation of past viewpoints in anthropology and brings the subject matter to life.

Anthropology: Appreciating Human Diversity


Author: Conrad Phillip Kottak
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education
ISBN: 9780077861544
Category: Social Science
Page: 576
View: 9090

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A leading name in anthropology, Conrad Philip Kottak continues to define student learning in the general anthropology course. Anthropology: Appreciating Human Diversity offers an up-to-date holistic introduction to general anthropology from the four-field perspective. Key themes of appreciating the experiences students bring to the classroom, appreciating human diversity, and appreciating the field of anthropology are showcased throughout the text. Focusing on an increasingly interconnected world, the new Focus on Globalization essays examine topics as diverse as tourism in the ancient and modern worlds, global disease pandemics, world events (including the Olympics and the World Cup), and the expansion of international finance and branding. Connect is the only integrated learning system that empowers students by continuously adapting to deliver precisely what they need, when they need it, and how they need it, so that your class time is more engaging and effective.

Cultural Diversity In Russian Cities

The Urban Landscape in the post-Soviet Era
Author: Cordula Gdaniec
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 085745837X
Category: Social Science
Page: 196
View: 4038

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Cultural diversity — the multitude of different lifestyles that are not necessarily based on ethnic culture — is a catchphrase increasingly used in place of multiculturalism and in conjunction with globalization. Even though it is often used as a slogan it does capture a widespread phenomenon that cities must contend with in dealing with their increasingly diverse populations. The contributors examine how Russian cities are responding and through case studies from Moscow, St. Petersburg, Novosibirsk, and Sochi explore the ways in which different cultures are inscribed into urban spaces, when and where they are present in public space, and where and how they carve out their private spaces. Through its unique exploration of the Russian example, this volume addresses the implications of the fragmented urban landscape on cultural practices and discourses, ethnicity, lifestyles and subcultures, and economic practices, and in doing so provides important insights applicable to a global context.

Understanding Cultural Transmission in Anthropology

A Critical Synthesis
Author: Roy Ellen,Stephen J. Lycett,Sarah E. Johns
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 0857459945
Category: Social Science
Page: 392
View: 659

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The concept of "cultural transmission" is central to much contemporary anthropological theory, since successful human reproduction through social systems is essential for effective survival and for enhancing the adaptiveness of individual humans and local populations. Yet, what is understood by the phrase and how it might best be studied is highly contested. This book brings together contributions that reflect the current diversity of approaches - from the fields of biology, primatology, palaeoanthropology, psychology, social anthropology, ethnobiology, and archaeology - to examine social and cultural transmission from a range of perspectives and at different scales of generalization. The comprehensive introduction explores some of the problems and connections. Overall, the book provides a timely synthesis of current accounts of cultural transmission in relation to cognitive process, practical action, and local socio-ecological context, while linking these with explanations of longer-term evolutionary trajectories.

The Cultural Return


Author: Susan Hegeman
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520951824
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 204
View: 6547

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This insightful book tracks the concept of culture across a range of scholarly disciplines and much of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries—years that saw the emergence of new fields and subfields (cultural studies, the new cultural history, literary new historicism, as well as ethnic and minority studies) and came to be called "the cultural turn." Since the 1990s, however, the idea of culture has fallen out of scholarly favor. Susan Hegeman engages with a diversity of disciplines, including anthropology, literary studies, sociology, philosophy, psychology, and political science, to historicize the rise and fall of the cultural turn and to propose ways that culture may still be a vital concept in the global present.

Applied Anthropology

Domains of Application
Author: Satish Kedia,John Van Willigen
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275978419
Category: Social Science
Page: 370
View: 397

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Two pioneers in the field of applied anthropology have compiled a groundbreaking, comprehensive anthology, which provides contributions from key figures of the anthropological world together in a single volume.

The Challenge of Human Diversity

Mirrors, Bridges, and Chasms, Third Edition
Author: DeWight R. Middleton
Publisher: Waveland Press
ISBN: 1478609699
Category: Social Science
Page: 124
View: 358

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Middletons fair, uncluttered synthesis of a wide-ranging topic continues to offer inspiration for thinking about what it means to be different fromand similar toOthers. Brief ethnographic excerpts are interwoven to demonstrate the hold that culture has on us. Such firsthand experiences, reported by anthropologists, reveal the challenging and sometimes humorous situations that can arise when we attempt to understand Othersand when they do the same with us. Heralded by Anthropology Today: Middleton, by making the sensory and intellectual challenge of culture shock so central to his pedagogic strategy, has found common ground that should unite all schools of cultural anthropology. The work brims with valuable insights that broaden possibilities to achieve rewarding human interaction, whether in our own neighborhood or across the globe. Arguably one of the best contemporary treatments of cultural diversity available, the latest edition includes expanded discussions of applied anthropology and ethics.

Cognitive Foundations of Natural History

Towards an Anthropology of Science
Author: Scott Atran
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521438711
Category: Science
Page: 360
View: 4920

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Inspired by a debate between Noam Chomsky and Jean Piaget, this work traces the development of natural history from Aristotle to Darwin, and demonstrates how the science of plants and animals has emerged from the common conceptions of folkbiology.

Humankind: How Biology and Geography Shape Human Diversity


Author: Alexander H. Harcourt
Publisher: Pegasus Books
ISBN: 1605987859
Category: Science
Page: 368
View: 6415

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An innovative and illuminating look at how the evolution of the human species has been shaped by the world around us, from anatomy and physiology, to cultural diversity and population density. Where did the human species originate? Why are tropical peoples much more diverse than those at polar latitudes? Why can only Japanese peoples digest seaweed? How are darker skin, sunlight, and fertility related? Did Neanderthals and Homo Sapiens ever interbreed? In Humankind, U. C. Davis professor Alexander Harcourt answers these questions and more, as he explains how the expansion of the human species around the globe and our interaction with our environment explains much about why humans differ from one region of the world to another, not only biologically, but culturally. What effects have other species had on the distribution of humans around the world, and we, in turn, on their distribution? And how have human populations affected each other’s geography, even existence? For the first time in a single book, Alexander Harcourt brings these topics together to help us understand why we are, what we are, where we are. It turns out that when one looks at humanity's expansion around the world, and in the biological explanations for our geographic diversity, we humans are often just another primate. Humanity's distribution around the world and the type of organism we are today has been shaped by the same biogeographical forces that shape other species.

Gender Diversity

Crosscultural Variations, Second Edition
Author: Serena Nanda
Publisher: Waveland Press
ISBN: 147861546X
Category: Social Science
Page: 147
View: 5723

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Anthropologist Serena Nanda has heralded the importance of understanding human similarities and differences throughout her writing and teaching career. This was especially evidenced in her groundbreaking work, Gender Diversity: Crosscultural Variations, a masterful, far-reaching examination of the relationships between sex, gender, and sexuality and how they are culturally constructed. Rich ethnographic examples representing nine cultures illuminate the need to analyze sex/gender roles and identities on the basis of broad cultural patterns and distinct cultural features, including social class, ethnicity, age, religion, urban or rural residence, and exposure to Western cultures. The latest edition incorporates new material on hijras in Bangladesh, three gender alternatives in Indonesia, and global changes related to migration, health, and communication. Concept-reinforcing questions have been added to each chapter. Gender Diversity, Second Edition encourages readers to think in new ways about what they consider natural, normal, or morally right. As a concise supplement with multidisciplinary appeal, the enhanced edition is sure to energize the undergraduate classroom.

Culture Sketches


Author: Holly Peters-Golden
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Higher Education
ISBN: 0077433033
Category: Electronic books
Page: 321
View: 2462

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Ideal for any cultural anthropology course, this brief collection of ethnographic case studies exposes students to 15 different cultures. The groups selected are peoples whose traditional cultures are uniquely their own. Each has distinctive patterns and practices; each has faced the challenge of an encroaching world, with differing results. Moreover, they often provide the prime illustrations of important concepts in introductory anthropology course including Azande witchcraft, Ju/'hoansi egalitarianism, Trobriand kula exchange, and Minangkabau matriliny. As such, this volume can stand alone.

The Value of Life

Biological Diversity And Human Society
Author: Stephen R. Kellert
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 1610913418
Category: Science
Page: 282
View: 447

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The Value of Life is an exploration of the actual and perceived importance of biological diversity for human beings and society. Stephen R. Kellert identifies ten basic values, which he describes as biologically based, inherent human tendencies that are greatly influenced and moderated by culture, learning, and experience. Drawing on 20 years of original research, he considers: the universal basis for how humans value nature differences in those values by gender, age, ethnicity, occupation, and geographic location how environment-related activities affect values variation in values relating to different species how vlaues vary across cultures policy and management implications Throughout the book, Kellert argues that the preservation of biodiversity is fundamentally linked to human well-being in the largest sense as he illustrates the importance of biological diversity to the human sociocultural and psychological condition.

Anthropology and Aging

Comprehensive Reviews
Author: Robert L. Rubinstein
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9400920318
Category: Social Science
Page: 204
View: 2370

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In the Museum of Man

Race, Anthropology, and Empire in France, 1850–1950
Author: Alice L. Conklin
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801469031
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 1339

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In the Museum of Man offers new insight into the thorny relationship between science, society, and empire at the high-water mark of French imperialism and European racism. Alice L. Conklin takes us into the formative years of French anthropology and social theory between 1850 and 1900; then deep into the practice of anthropology, under the name of ethnology, both in Paris and in the empire before and especially after World War I; and finally, into the fate of the discipline and its practitioners under the German Occupation and its immediate aftermath. Conklin addresses the influence exerted by academic networks, museum collections, and imperial connections in defining human diversity socioculturally rather than biologically, especially in the wake of resurgent anti-Semitism at the time of the Dreyfus Affair and in the 1930s and 1940s. Students of the progressive social scientist Marcel Mauss were exposed to the ravages of imperialism in the French colonies where they did fieldwork; as a result, they began to challenge both colonialism and the scientific racism that provided its intellectual justification. Indeed, a number of them were killed in the Resistance, fighting for the humanist values they had learned from their teachers and in the field. A riveting story of a close-knit community of scholars who came to see all societies as equally complex, In the Museum of Man serves as a reminder that if scientific expertise once authorized racism, anthropologists also learned to rethink their paradigms and mobilize against racial prejudice—a lesson well worth remembering today.