Annals of the Caliphs' Kitchens

Ibn Sayy?r Al-Warr?q's Tenth-Century Baghdadi Cookbook
Author: al-Muẓaffar Ibn Naṣr Ibn Sayyār al-Warrāq
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004158677
Category: History
Page: 867
View: 6703

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This English translation of al-Warraq’s tenth-century cookbook offers a unique glimpse into the culinary culture of medieval Islam. Hundreds of recipes, anecdotes, and poems, with an extensive Introduction, a Glossary, an Appendix, and color illustration. Informative and entertaining to scholars and general readers.

Annals of the Caliphs' Kitchens

Ibn Sayyār al-Warrāq's Tenth-Century Baghdadi Cookbook
Author: Nawal Nasrallah
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9047423054
Category: Religion
Page: 888
View: 9173

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This English translation of al-Warraq’s tenth-century cookbook offers a unique glimpse into the culinary culture of medieval Islam. Hundreds of recipes, anecdotes, and poems, with an extensive Introduction, a Glossary, an Appendix, and color illustration. Informative and entertaining to scholars and general readers.

Annals of the Caliphs' Kitchens

Ibn Sayyār Al-Warrāq's Tenth-century Baghdadi Cookbook
Author: al-Muẓaffar ibn Naṣr Ibn Sayyār al-Warrāq,Nawal Nasrallah
Publisher: Brill Academic Publishers
ISBN: 9789004188112
Category: Cooking
Page: 867
View: 9097

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Written nearly a thousand years ago, al-Warraq's cookbook is the most comprehensive work of its kind. This traditional cookbook with more than 600 recipes from the luxurious cuisine of medieval Islam is also a rare guide to the contemporary culinary culture. Its numerous anecdotes and poems unfold the role of food in the politics of Islam's golden era. Introducing this elegant translation is a thorough survey of the period and its food culture. An extensive Glossary, in Arabic and English, of medieval ingredients and dishes, and an Appendix of historical figures provide the necessary reference tools for this work. Making this key resource available in English for the first time to scholars and the general reader fills a gap in the cultural history of medieval Islam. Over 30 color illustrations. "[...] this is an impressive piece of scholarship and a joy to read both for pleasure and for more sober historical reflection on the ways medieval bourgeois Arab Muslim, and also Christian and Jewish urbanites, enjoyed themselves at table."-David Waines, Lancaster University "[...] this is a major resource that should be in every university library and will be consulted for years to come by anyone who is interested in the history of cuisine in the Middle East."-Daniel Martin Varisco, Hofstra University

Delights from the Garden of Eden

A Cookbook and History of the Iraqi Cuisine (Abbreviated Version of the Second Edition)
Author: Nawal Nasrallah
Publisher: Equinox Publishing (Indonesia)
ISBN: 9781781794579
Category: Cooking
Page: 440
View: 2112

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This is an abbreviated version of the award-winning and highly acclaimed second edition published in 2013, beautifully illustrated throughout, and displays the diversity of the region's traditional culinary practices, delicious and enduring. This edition contains 300 of the original 400 recipes, all tested and easy to follow, and covers all food categories. Ingredients and cooking techniques indigenous to the region are fully explained, with practical ways for making them in the convenience of our modern kitchens, such as baking the Iraqi flat tannour bread and sammoun, and grilling fish masgouf way. Unlike the majority of cookbooks, this book uniquely traces the genesis and development of the Iraqi cuisine over the centuries, starting with the ancient Mesopotamians, through medieval times and leading to the present, aided throughout by the author's intimate native knowledge of cookery. Of particular interest are the book's numerous food-related folkloric stories, reminiscences, anecdotes, songs, poems, excerpts from narratives written by foreign visitors to the region, and cultural explications of customs, all interwoven with the recipes. The book's comprehensive glossary helps familiarize the reader with the indigenous ingredients used in creating authentic Iraqi meals, with substitutes suggested without compromising taste or tradition. This book is a valuable addition to the shelves of specialized and general libraries alike, and a must-have for food lovers everywhere.

Scheherazade's Feasts

Foods of the Medieval Arab World
Author: Habeeb Salloum,Leila Salloum Elias,Muna Salloum
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 081224477X
Category: Cooking
Page: 256
View: 9101

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The author of the thirteenth-century Arabic cookbook Kitāb al-?abīkh proposed that food was among the foremost pleasures in life. Scheherazade's Feasts invites adventurous cooks to test this hypothesis. From the seventh to the thirteenth centuries, the influence and power of the medieval Islamic world stretched from the Middle East to the Iberian Peninsula, and this Golden Age gave rise to great innovation in gastronomy no less than in science, philosophy, and literature. The medieval Arab culinary empire was vast and varied: with trade and conquest came luxury, abundance, new ingredients, and new ideas. The emergence of a luxurious cuisine in this period inspired an extensive body of literature: poets penned lyrics to the beauty of asparagus or the aroma of crushed almonds; nobles documented the dining customs obliged by etiquette and opulence; manuals prescribed meal plans to deepen the pleasure of eating and curtail digestive distress. Drawn from this wealth of medieval Arabic writing, Scheherazade's Feasts presents more than a hundred recipes for the beverages, foods, and sweets of a sophisticated and cosmopolitan empire. The recipes are translated from medieval sources and adapted for the modern cook, with replacements suggested for rare ingredients such as the first buds of the date tree or fat rendered from the tail of a sheep. With the guidance of prolific cookbook writer Habeeb Salloum and his daughters, historians Leila and Muna, these recipes are easy to follow and deliciously appealing. The dishes are framed with verse inspired by them, culinary tips, or tales of the caliphs and kings whose courts demanded their royal preparation. To contextualize these selections, a richly researched introduction details the foodscape of the medieval Islamic world.

Dates

A Global History
Author: Nawal Nasrallah
Publisher: Reaktion Books
ISBN: 186189984X
Category: Cooking
Page: 136
View: 466

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In Dates, Nawal Nasrallah draws on her experience of growing up in the lands of ancient Mesopotamia, where the date palm was first cultivated, to explore the history behind the fruit. Dates have an important role in their arid homeland of the Middle East, where they are a dietary staple and can be consumed fresh or dried, as a snack or a dessert, and are even thought to have aphrodisiac qualities. In this history, Nasrallah describes the central role the date palm has played in the economy of the Middle East. This informative account of the date palm’s story follows its journey from its land of origin to the far-flung regions where it is cultivated today. Along the way, Nasrallah weaves many fascinating and humorous anecdotes that explore the etymology, history, culture, religion, myths, and legends surrounding dates. For example, she explains how the tree came to be a symbol of the Tree of Life and associated with the fiery phoenix bird, the famous ancient goddess Ishtar, and the moon, and how the medjool date acquired its name. This delightful and unusual book is generously illustrated with many beautiful images, and supplemented with more than a dozen delicious date recipes for savory dishes, sweets, and wine.

A Baghdad Cookery Book

The Book of Dishes (Kitāb Al-ṭabīkh)
Author: Muḥammad ibn al-Ḥasan Ibn al-Karīm,Charles Perry
Publisher: Prospect Books (UK)
ISBN: 9781903018422
Category: Cooking
Page: 127
View: 8781

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This special issue of Petits Propos Culinaires is wholly devoted to a new translation of the text called, for convenience' sake, A Baghdad Cookery Book, that is, The Book of Dishes (Kitab al-Tabikh) by Muhammad b. al-Hasan b. Muhammad b. al-Karim, the scribe of Baghdad, usually called Al Baghdadi. This thirteenth-century text was for a long while the only medieval Arab manuscript available in English thanks to the translation, in the 1930s, by A.J. Arberry which was subsequently re-published by Prospect Books in 2001 in Medieval Arab Cookery. In this new translation Charles Perry corrects many errors and misreadings that had crept into early transcriptions. Here we have spread before us, as if on a glorious sideboard, the immense wealth and ingenuity of cooking in the golden age of Arab civilisation. We can detect the influence of Persia, as well as echoes of the Bedouin life, and even the mark of the infidel Christian crusaders.

Treasure Trove of Benefits and Variety at the Table

A Fourteenth-century Egyptian Cookbook
Author: N.A
Publisher: Islamic History and Civilizati
ISBN: 9789004347298
Category: History
Page: 704
View: 8298

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The fourteenth-century Egyptian cookbook, Kanz al-fawāʾid fī tanwīʿ al-mawāʾid, is a treasure trove of 830 recipes of dishes, digestives, refreshing beverages, and more. Here, for the first time, it has been meticulously translated into English and supplemented with a comprehensive introduction, glossary, illustrations, and twenty-two modern adaptations of its recipes.

Sweet Delights from a Thousand and One Nights

The Story of Traditional Arab Sweets
Author: Habeeb Salloum
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857733419
Category: Cooking
Page: 272
View: 6265

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Which dessert is named after the heroic third-century Queen Zenobia of Palmyra? Which luscious rice pudding shares its name with the eighth-century Abbasid Caliph al-Ma’mun? How does one make the perfect Baqlawah? Blending cookery with culture and recipes with history, this is the fascinating and delectable story of traditional Arab sweets. The authors here take us on a culinary journey across Iraq, Syria, Egypt and al-Andalus, presenting readers with clear and easy-to-recreate recipes from across the medieval Arab world.

Medieval Cuisine of the Islamic World

A Concise History with 174 Recipes
Author: Lilia Zaouali
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520247833
Category: Cooking
Page: 224
View: 2316

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Vinegar and sugar, dried fruit, rose water, spices from India and China, sweet wine made from raisins and datesÑthese are the flavors of the golden age of Arab cuisine. This book, a delightful culinary adventure that is part history and part cookbook, surveys the gastronomical art that developed at the Caliph's sumptuous palaces in ninth-and tenth-century Baghdad, drew inspiration from Persian, Greco-Roman, and Turkish cooking, and rapidly spread across the Mediterranean. In a charming narrative, Lilia Zaouali brings to life Islam's vibrant culinary heritage. The second half of the book gathers an extensive selection of original recipes drawn from medieval culinary sources along with thirty-one contemporary recipes that evoke the flavors of the Middle Ages. Featuring dishes such as Chicken with Walnuts and Pomegranate, Beef with Pistachios, Bazergan Couscous, Lamb Stew with Fresh Apricots, Tuna and Eggplant PurŽe with Vinegar and Caraway, and Stuffed Dates, the book also discusses topics such as cookware, utensils, aromatic substances, and condiments, making it both an entertaining read and an informative resource for anyone who enjoys the fine art of cooking.

Tastes of Byzantium

The Cuisine of a Legendary Empire
Author: Andrew Dalby
Publisher: I. B. Tauris
ISBN: 9781848851658
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 3556

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For centuries the food and culinary delights of the Byzantine empire -- centred on Constantinople -- have captivated the west, although it appeared that very little information had been passed down to us. Andrew Dalby's Tastes of Byzantium now reveals in astonishing detail, for the first time, what was eaten in the court of the Eastern Roman Empire -- and how it was cooked. Fusing the spices of the Romans with the seafood and simple local food of the Aegean and Greek world, the cuisine of the Byzantines was unique and a precursor to much of the food of modern Turkey and Greece. Bringing this vanished cuisine to life in vivid and sensual detail, Dalby describes the sights and smells of Constantinople and its marketplaces, relates travellers' tales and paints a comprehensive picture of the recipes and customs of the empire and their relationship to health and the seasons, love and medicine. For food-lovers and historians alike, Tastes of Byzantium is both essential and riveting -- an extraordinary illumination of everyday life in the Byzantine world.

The Ni'matnama Manuscript of the Sultans of Mandu

The Sultan's Book of Delights
Author: Norah M. Titley
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134268076
Category: Cooking
Page: 544
View: 3738

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The Ni'matnama is a late fifteenth-century book of the recipes of the eccentric Sultan of Mandu (Madhya Pradesh), Ghiyath Shahi, collected and added to by his son and successor, Nasir Shah. It contains recipes for cooking a variety of delicacies and epicurean delights, as well as providing remedies and aphrodisiacs for the Sultan and his court. It also includes important sections on the preparation of betel leaves as well as advice on the logistics of hunting expeditions and warfare. The text provides a remarkable and tantalizing account of rarified courtly life in a fifteenth-century Indian Sultanate region.

The Oldest Cuisine in the World

Cooking in Mesopotamia
Author: Jean Bottéro
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226067353
Category: Cooking
Page: 134
View: 2518

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In this intriguing blend of the commonplace and the ancient, Jean Bottéro presents the first extensive look at the delectable secrets of Mesopotamia. Bottéro’s broad perspective takes us inside the religious rites, everyday rituals, attitudes and taboos, and even the detailed preparation techniques involving food and drink in Mesopotamian high culture during the second and third millennia BCE, as the Mesopotamians recorded them. Offering everything from translated recipes for pigeon and gazelle stews, the contents of medicinal teas and broths, and the origins of ingredients native to the region, this book reveals the cuisine of one of history’s most fascinating societies. Links to the modern world, along with incredible recreations of a rich, ancient culture through its cuisine, make Bottéro’s guide an entertaining and mesmerizing read.

Sandalwood and Carrion

Smell in Indian Religion and Culture
Author: James McHugh
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199996245
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 990

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James McHugh offers the first comprehensive examination of the concepts and practices related to smell in pre-modern India. Drawing on a wide range of textual sources, from poetry to medical texts, he shows the significant religious and cultural role of smell in India throughout the first millennium CE. McHugh describes the arts of perfumery developed in royal courts, temples, and monasteries, which were connected to a trade in exotic aromatics. Through their transformative nature, perfumes played an important part in every aspect of Indian life from seduction to diplomacy and religion. The aesthetics of smell dictated many of the materials, practices, and ceremonies associated with India's religious culture. McHugh shows how religious discourses on the purpose of life emphasized the pleasures of the senses, including olfactory experience, as valid ends in themselves. Fragrances and stenches were analogous to certain values, aesthetic or ethical, and in a system where karmic results often had a sensory impact-where evil literally stank-the ethical and aesthetic became difficult to distinguish. Through the study of smell, McHugh strengthens our understanding of the vital connection between the theological and the physical world. Sandalwood and Carrion explores smell in pre-modern India from many perspectives, covering such topics as philosophical accounts of smell perception, odors in literature, the history of perfumery in India, the significance of sandalwood in Buddhism, and the divine offering of perfume to the gods.

Mālik and Medina

Islamic Legal Reasoning in the Formative Period
Author: Umar F. Abd-Allah
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004247882
Category: Religion
Page: 566
View: 6847

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This book studies the legal reasoning of M?lik ibn Anas. It emphasizes that the Sunn? schools of law emerged during the formative period as independent legal methodologies.

The Book of Sent Soví

Medieval Recipes from Catalonia
Author: N.A
Publisher: Tamesis Books
ISBN: 9781855661646
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 232
View: 7312

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The oldest Catalan cookery book.

The Political Language of Islam


Author: Bernard Lewis
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226476933
Category: History
Page: 184
View: 1650

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Discuss the Islamic Scriptures that form the basis for its political language, looks at the changes in modern Islamic politics, and analyzes the transformation of political terms.

The Arabic Hermes

From Pagan Sage to Prophet of Science
Author: Kevin van Bladel
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199704484
Category: Philosophy
Page: 296
View: 8322

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This is the first major study devoted to the early Arabic reception and adaption of the figure of Hermes Trismegistus, the legendary Egyptian sage to whom were ascribed numerous works on astrology, alchemy, talismans, medicine, and philosophy. Before the more famous Renaissance European reception of the ancient Greek Hermetica, the Arabic tradition about Hermes and the works under his name had been developing and flourishing for seven hundred years. The legendary Egyptian Hermes Trismegistus was renowned in Roman antiquity as an ancient sage whose teachings were represented in books of philosophy and occult science. The works in his name, written in Greek by Egyptians living under Roman rule, subsequently circulated in many languages and regions of the Roman and Sasanian Persian empires. After the rise of Arabic as a prestigious language of scholarship in the eighth century, accounts of Hermes identity and Hermetic texts were translated into Arabic along with the hundreds of other works translated from Greek, Middle Persian, and other literary languages of antiquity. Hermetica were in fact among the earliest translations into Arabic, appearing already in the eighth century. This book explains the origins of the Arabic myth of Hermes Trismegistus, its sources, the reasons for its peculiar character, and its varied significance for the traditions of Hermetica in Asia and northern Africa as well as Europe. It shows who pre-modern Arabic scholars thought Hermes was and how they came to that view.