Andean Archaeology I

Variations in sociopolitical organization. 1
Author: William H. Isbell,Helaine Silverman
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9780306467721
Category: History
Page: 390
View: 2255

Continue Reading →

The origins and development of civilization are vital components to the understanding of the cultural processes that create human societies. Comparing and contrasting the evolutionary sequences from different civilizations is one approach to discovering their unique development. One area for comparison is in the Central Andes where several societies remained in isolation without a written language. As a direct result, the only resource for understanding these societies is in their material artefacts. In this work, the focus is on what the material remains reveal about the sociopolitical structures of the Central Andes region. This focus on ancient identity politics adopts a perspective that explicitly interrogates the processes and strategies by which higher social groups acted as self-interested agents in the achievement and maintenance of differential status, including: symbols of power and their role in the construction of an elite identity; social legitimization and achievement of economic or material power; design of architecture for the display of power and exercise of social control; and promotion of labor-intensive agriculture for the purpose of surplus production and extraction.

Andean Archaeology III

North and South
Author: William Isbell,Helaine Silverman
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9780387757308
Category: Social Science
Page: 523
View: 513

Continue Reading →

The third volume in the Andean Archaeology series, this book focuses on the marked cultural differences between the northern and southern regions of the Central Andes, and considers the conditions under which these differences evolved, grew pronounced, and diminished. This book continues the dynamic, current problem-oriented approach to the field of Andean Archaeology that began with Andean Archaeology I and Andean Archaeology II. Combines up-to-date research, diverse theoretical platforms, and far-reaching interpretations to draw provocative and thoughtful conclusions.

Handbook of South American Archaeology


Author: Helaine Silverman,William Isbell
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9780387749075
Category: Social Science
Page: 1192
View: 5569

Continue Reading →

Perhaps the contributions of South American archaeology to the larger field of world archaeology have been inadequately recognized. If so, this is probably because there have been relatively few archaeologists working in South America outside of Peru and recent advances in knowledge in other parts of the continent are only beginning to enter larger archaeological discourse. Many ideas of and about South American archaeology held by scholars from outside the area are going to change irrevocably with the appearance of the present volume. Not only does the Handbook of South American Archaeology (HSAA) provide immense and broad information about ancient South America, the volume also showcases the contributions made by South Americans to social theory. Moreover, one of the merits of this volume is that about half the authors (30) are South Americans, and the bibliographies in their chapters will be especially useful guides to Spanish and Portuguese literature as well as to the latest research. It is inevitable that the HSAA will be compared with the multi-volume Handbook of South American Indians (HSAI), with its detailed descriptions of indigenous peoples of South America, that was organized and edited by Julian Steward. Although there are heroic archaeological essays in the HSAI, by the likes of Junius Bird, Gordon Willey, John Rowe, and John Murra, Steward states frankly in his introduction to Volume Two that “arch- ology is included by way of background” to the ethnographic chapters.

Andean Archaeology


Author: Helaine Silverman
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9780631234012
Category: Social Science
Page: 360
View: 5837

Continue Reading →

This book provides an introduction to one of the most fascinating and well-known centers of ancient civilization. Explores the rise of civilization in the Central Andes from the time of the region's earliest inhabitants to the emergence of the Inca state many thousands of years later. Comprised of 13 newly commissioned chapters written by leading archaeologists representing current thinking in the field. Presents the central debates in contemporary Inca and Andean archaeology. Progresses chronologically and culturally to reveal the processes by which multiple Andean societies became increasingly complex.

A Companion to Latin American History


Author: Thomas H. Holloway
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781444391640
Category: History
Page: 544
View: 683

Continue Reading →

The Companion to Latin American History collects the work of leading experts in the field to create a single-source overview of the diverse history and current trends in the study of Latin America. Presents a state-of-the-art overview of the history of Latin America Written by the top international experts in the field 28 chapters come together as a superlative single source of information for scholars and students Recognizes the breadth and diversity of Latin American history by providing systematic chronological and geographical coverage Covers both historical trends and new areas of interest

Andean Archaeology II

Art, Landscape, and Society
Author: William H. Isbell,Helaine Silverman
Publisher: Taylor & Francis US
ISBN: 9780306472503
Category: History
Page: 376
View: 4083

Continue Reading →

The second volume of specially commissioned essays to reflect on material evidence from the Andes moves the emphasis away from the socio-political structure of the region's early civilisations to reflect on the ways in which Andean culture was shaped by its art, architecture and landscape.

From Foraging to Farming in the Andes

New Perspectives on Food Production and Social Organization
Author: Tom D. Dillehay
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139495631
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
View: 3928

Continue Reading →

Archeologists have always considered the beginnings of Andean civilization from c.13,000 to 6,000 years ago to be important in terms of the appearance of domesticated plants and animals, social differentiation, and a sedentary lifestyle, but there is more to this period than just these developments. During this period, the spread of crop production and other technologies, kinship-based labor projects, mound-building, and population aggregation formed ever-changing conditions across the Andes. From Foraging to Farming in the Andes proposes a new and more complex model for understanding the transition from hunting and gathering to cultivation. It argues that such developments evolved regionally, were fluid and uneven, and were subject to reversal. This book develops these arguments from a large body of archaeological evidence, collected over 30 years in two valleys in northern Peru, and then places the valleys in the context of recent scholarship studying similar developments around the world.

Domestic Architecture, Ethnicity, and Complementarity in the South-Central Andes


Author: Mark S. Aldenderfer
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 1587294699
Category: History
Page: 188
View: 6491

Continue Reading →

Domestic Architecture, Ethnicity, and Complementarity in the South-Central Andes is a comprehensive and challenging look at the burgeoning field of Andean domestic architecture. Aldenderfer and fourteen contributors use domestic architecture to explore two major topics in the prehistory of the south-central Andes: the development of different forms of complementary relationships between highland and lowland peoples and the definition of the ethnic affiliations of these peoples.

Against Typological Tyranny in Archaeology

A South American Perspective
Author: Cristóbal Gnecco,Carl Langebaek
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461487242
Category: Social Science
Page: 236
View: 7013

Continue Reading →

The papers in this book question the tyranny of typological thinking in archaeology through case studies from various South American countries (Venezuela, Colombia, Bolivia, Argentina, and Brazil) and Antarctica. They aim to show that typologies are unavoidable (they are, after all, the way to create networks that give meanings to symbols) but that their tyranny can be overcome if they are used from a critical, heuristic and non-prescriptive stance: critical because the complacent attitude towards their tyranny is replaced by a militant stance against it; heuristic because they are used as means to reach alternative and suggestive interpretations but not as ultimate and definite destinies; and non-prescriptive because instead of using them as threads to follow they are rather used as constitutive parts of more complex and connective fabrics. The papers included in the book are diverse in temporal and locational terms. They cover from so called Formative societies in lowland Venezuela to Inca-related ones in Bolivia; from the coastal shell middens of Brazil to the megalithic sculptors of SW Colombia. Yet, the papers are related. They have in common their shared rejection of established, naturalized typologies that constrain the way archaeologists see, forcing their interpretations into well known and predictable conclusions. Their imaginative interpretative proposals flee from the secure comfort of venerable typologies, many suspicious because of their association with colonial political narratives. Instead, the authors propose novel ways of dealing with archaeological data.

The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial


Author: Sarah Tarlow,Liv Nilsson Stutz
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191650390
Category: Social Science
Page: 872
View: 4931

Continue Reading →

The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial reviews the current state of mortuary archaeology and its practice, highlighting its often contentious place in the modern socio-politics of archaeology. It contains forty-four chapters which focus on the history of the discipline and its current scientific techniques and methods. Written by leading, international scholars in the field, it derives its examples and case studies from a wide range of time periods, such as the middle palaeolithic to the twentieth century, and geographical areas which include Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia. Combining up-to-date knowledge of relevant archaeological research with critical assessments of the theme and an evaluation of future research trajectories, it draws attention to the social, symbolic, and theoretical aspects of interpreting mortuary archaeology. The volume is well-illustrated with maps, plans, photographs, and illustrations and is ideally suited for students and researchers.

The Art and Archaeology of the Moche

An Ancient Andean Society of the Peruvian North Coast
Author: Steve Bourget,Kimberly L. Jones
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292783191
Category: Social Science
Page: 315
View: 5223

Continue Reading →

Renowned for their monumental architecture and rich visual culture, the Moche inhabited the north coast of Peru during the Early Intermediate Period (AD 100-800). Archaeological discoveries over the past century and the dissemination of Moche artifacts to museums around the world have given rise to a widespread and continually increasing fascination with this complex culture, which expressed its beliefs about the human and supernatural worlds through finely crafted ceramic and metal objects of striking realism and visual sophistication. In this standard-setting work, an international, multidisciplinary team of scholars who are at the forefront of Moche research present a state-of-the-art overview of Moche culture. The contributors address various issues of Moche society, religion, and material culture based on multiple lines of evidence and methodologies, including iconographic studies, archaeological investigations, and forensic analyses. Some of the articles present the results of long-term studies of major issues in Moche iconography, while others focus on more specifically defined topics such as site studies, the influence of El Niño/Southern Oscillation on Moche society, the nature of Moche warfare and sacrifice, and the role of Moche visual culture in decoding social and political frameworks.

The Comparative Archaeology of Complex Societies


Author: Michael E. Smith
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139502034
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
View: 3551

Continue Reading →

Part of a resurgence in the comparative study of ancient societies, this book presents a variety of methods and approaches to comparative analysis through the examination of wide-ranging case studies. Each chapter is a comparative study, and the diverse topics and regions covered in the book contribute to the growing understanding of variation and change in ancient complex societies. The authors explore themes ranging from urbanization and settlement patterns, to the political strategies of kings and chiefs, to the economic choices of individuals and households. The case studies cover an array of geographical settings, from the Andes to Southeast Asia. The authors are leading archaeologists whose research on early empires, states, and chiefdoms is at the cutting edge of scientific archaeology.

Andean Archaeology

Papers in Memory of Clifford Evans
Author: Ramiro Matos Mendieta,Solveig A. Turpin,Herbert H. Eling
Publisher: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 238
View: 6754

Continue Reading →

Social Bioarchaeology


Author: Sabrina C. Agarwal,Bonnie A. Glencross
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781444390520
Category: Social Science
Page: 496
View: 3387

Continue Reading →

Illustrates new methodological directions in analyzing human social and biological variation Offers a wide array of research on past populations around the globe Explains the central features of bioarchaeological research by key researchers and established experts around the world

Us and Them

Archaeology and Ethnicity in the Andes
Author: Richard Martin Reycraft
Publisher: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 242
View: 7748

Continue Reading →

Presented at a symposium held at the annual meeting of the Society for American Archeology in April 1999, 14 papers advance the study of prehistoric Andean ethnicity. But unlike early 20th century approaches that generated lists of presumably static ethnic traits, the current focus is on variations in material culture (illustrated) indicative of et

Time and Complexity in Historical Ecology

Studies in the Neotropical Lowlands
Author: William L. Balée,Clark L. Erickson
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231509618
Category: Science
Page: 432
View: 9919

Continue Reading →

This collection of studies by anthropologists, botanists, ecologists, and biologists is an important contribution to the emerging field of historical ecology. The book combines cutting-edge research with new perspectives to emphasize the close relationship between humans and their natural environment. Contributors examine how alterations in the natural world mirror human cultures, societies, and languages. Treating the landscape like a text, these researchers decipher patterns and meaning in the Ecuadorian Andes, Amazonia, the desert coast of Peru, and other regions in the neotropics. They show how local peoples have changed the landscape over time to fit their needs by managing and modifying species diversity, enhancing landscape heterogeneity, and controlling ecological disturbance. In turn, the environment itself becomes a form of architecture rich with historical and archaeological significance. Time and Complexity in Historical Ecology explores thousands of years of ecological history while also addressing important contemporary issues, such as biodiversity and genetic variation and change. Engagingly written and expertly researched, this book introduces and exemplifies a unique method for better understanding the link between humans and the biosphere.

Health and Lifestyle Change


Author: Rebecca Huss-Ashmore,Joan Schall,Mary Hediger
Publisher: UPenn Museum of Archaeology
ISBN: 9781931707015
Category: Social Science
Page: 144
View: 9908

Continue Reading →

The health impacts of changing behavior and lifestyle in a range of prehistoric, historic, and extant populations are examined in this volume. Of particular interest to the authors is the identification of issues that link past and present, and the ability of research on disease in the past to shed light on modern health problems. MASCA Vol. 9