Ancient Cities

The Archaeology of Urban Life in the Ancient Near East and Egypt, Greece and Rome
Author: Charles Gates
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113467662X
Category: History
Page: 464
View: 5716

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Well illustrated with nearly 300 line drawings, maps and photographs, Ancient Cities surveys the cities of the ancient Near East, Egypt, and the Greek and Roman worlds from an archaeological perspective, and in their cultural and historical contexts. Covering a huge area geographically and chronologically, it brings to life the physical world of ancient city dwellers by concentrating on evidence recovered by archaeological excavations from the Mediterranean basin and south-west Asia Examining both pre-Classical and Classical periods, this is an excellent introductory textbook for students of classical studies and archaeology alike.

Egypt, Greece, and Rome

Civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean
Author: Charles Freeman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199651914
Category: Art
Page: 759
View: 455

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Covering more than four thousand years of ancient history, from the early Egyptians to the dawn of Byzantium, an illustrated introduction to the Mediterranean's three major civilizations examines their links and traces their influence up to the present day. UP.

What is Architectural History?


Author: Andrew Leach
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0745655203
Category: Architecture
Page: 184
View: 313

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What is Architectural History? considers the questions and problems posed by architectural historians since the rise of the discipline in the late nineteenth century. How do historians of architecture organise past time and relate it to the present? How does historical evidence translate into historical narrative? Should architectural history be useful for practicing architects? If so, how? Leach treats the disciplinarity of architectural history as an open question, moving between three key approaches to historical knowledge of architecture: within art history, as an historical specialisation and, most prominently, within architecture. He suggests that the confusions around this question have been productive, ensuring a rich variety of approaches to the project of exploring architecture historically. Read alongside introductory surveys of western and global architectural history, this book will open up questions of perspective, frame, and intent for students of architecture, art history, and history. Graduate students and established architectural historians will find much in this book to fuel discussions over the current state of the field in which they work.

Cities and the Shaping of Memory in the Ancient Near East


Author: Ömür Harmanşah
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107311187
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
View: 6637

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This book investigates the founding and building of cities in the ancient Near East. The creation of new cities was imagined as an ideological project or a divine intervention in the political narratives and mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, often masking the complex processes behind the social production of urban space. During the Early Iron Age (c.1200–850 BCE), Assyrian and Syro-Hittite rulers developed a highly performative official discourse that revolved around constructing cities, cultivating landscapes, building watercourses, erecting monuments and initiating public festivals. This volume combs through archaeological, epigraphic, visual, architectural and environmental evidence to tell the story of a region from the perspective of its spatial practices, landscape history and architectural technologies. It argues that the cultural processes of the making of urban spaces shape collective memory and identity as well as sites of political performance and state spectacle.

Egypt in the Eastern Mediterranean During the Old Kingdom

An Archaeological Perspective
Author: Karin Sowada
Publisher: Saint-Paul
ISBN: 9783525534557
Category: History
Page: 295
View: 1713

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This study presents a revised view of Egyptian foreign relations in the eastern Mediterranean during the Old Kingdom (3rd-6th Dynasties) based on an extensive analysis of old and new archaeological data, and its relationship to the well-known textual sources. The material demonstrates that while Egypt's most important relationships were with Byblos and the Lebanese coast generally, it was an active participant in the geo-political and economic affairs of the Levant throughout much of the third millennium BCE. The archaeological data shows that the foundation of these relationships was established at the beginning of the Early Dynastic Period and essentially continued until the end of the 6th Dynasty with ebbs, flows and changes of geographical and political emphasis. It is argued that, despite the paucity of textual data, the 4th Dynasty represents the apogee of Egypt's engagement in the region, a time when the centralised state was at the height of its power and control of human and economic capital. More broadly, this study shows that Egyptian interaction in the eastern Mediterranean fits the pattern of state-to-state contact between ruling elites which was underpinned by official expeditions engaged in gift and commodity exchange, diplomatic endeavours and military incursions.

Handbook to Life in Ancient Mesopotamia


Author: Stephen Bertman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195183641
Category: History
Page: 416
View: 5616

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Modern-day archaeological discoveries in the Near East continue to illuminate man's understanding of the ancient world. This illustrated handbook describes the culture, history, and people of Mesopotamia, as well as their struggle for survival and happiness.

Escape from Smyrna


Author: Charles Gates
Publisher: John Hunt Publishing
ISBN: 1780998481
Category: Fiction
Page: 332
View: 7600

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Escape from Smyrna, a mystery novel set in Turkey and Greece, unveils the intertwining histories of three families, Anglo-American, Turkish, and Greek, bound together by an ancient necklace that incites violence yet has powers of healing and redemption. It is 1982. Four Swiss hippies steal a gold locket from a chapel on a barren Greek island. Soon after, it appears for sale in Istanbul's Covered Bazaar. Oran Crossmoor, an athletic 26-year-old American, buys the locket, recognizing it as part of a lost family heirloom, a necklace of four medieval reliquaries. When he shows it to Leyla Aslanoglu, a rich, witty octogenarian friend of his mother, she claims it as treasure of her family. But neither Oran nor Leyla has any idea that the answer to their conflict over the necklace lies in a dramatic escape from Smyrna decades earlier...

The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Coinage


Author: William E. Metcalf
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199372187
Category: Coins, Greek
Page: 720
View: 2996

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A large gap exists in the literature of ancient numismatics between general works intended for collectors and highly specialized studies addressed to numismatists. Indeed, there is hardly anything produced by knowledgeable numismatists that is easily accessible to the academic community at large or the interested lay reader. The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Coinage will fill this gap by providing a systematic overview of the major coinages of the classical world. The Handbook begins with a general introduction by volume editor William E. Metcalf followed by an article establishing the history and role of scientific analysis in ancient numismatics. The subsequent thirty-two chapters, all written by an international group of distinguished scholars, cover a vast geography and chronology, beginning with the first evidence of coins in Western Asia Minor in the seventh century BCE and continuing up to the transformation of coinage at the end of the Roman Empire. In addition to providing the essential background and current research questions of each of the major coinages, the Handbook also includes articles on the application of numismatic evidence to the disciplines of archaeology, economic history, art history, and ancient history. With helpful appendices, a glossary of specialized terms, indices of mints, persons, and general topics, and nearly 900 illustrations, The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Coinage will be an indispensable resource for scholars and students of the classical world, as well as a stimulating reference for collectors and interested lay readers.

Ancient Italy

regions without boundaries
Author: Guy Jolyon Bradley,Elena Isayev,Corinna Riva,University of Oxford. Dept. for Continuing Education
Publisher: Univ of Exeter Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 334
View: 8203

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Ancient Italy is the first English-language volume to provide a detailed archaeological portrait of the pre-Roman peoples of Italy—the Ligurians and Celts, the Veneti, the Picens, Etruscans, Faliscans, Latins, Samnites, peoples of Campania, and the populations of Italy’s southeastern regions. Addressing themes in the study of the ancient world such as settlement and landscape, identity, literature, and religious and funerary ritual, as well as social and cultural interaction, Ancient Italy introduces each region and its communities, summarizes recent scholarship, provides site-specific maps, and considers key issues in the region’s contemporary historiography. Designed to provide an important tool for researchers working on the ancient Mediterranean, this accessible volume provides a clear starting point for anyone interested in the peoples of ancient Italy.

Mesopotamia

The Invention of the City
Author: Gwendolyn Leick
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141927119
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 8712

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Situated in an area roughly corresponding to present-day Iraq, Mesopotamia is one of the great, ancient civilizations, though it is still relatively unknown. Yet, over 7,000 years ago in Mesopotamia, the very first cities were created. This is the first book to reveal how life was lived in ten Mesopotamian cities: from Eridu, the Mesopotamian Eden, to that potent symbol of decadence, Babylon - the first true metropolis: multicultural, multi-ethnic, the last centre of a dying civilization.

Thebes

A History
Author: Nicholas Rockwell
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317218299
Category: History
Page: 178
View: 7860

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Thebes offers a scholarly survey of the history and archaeology of the city, from 1600 BCE – 476 CE. Discussions of major developments in politics, war, society and culture form the basis of a chronological examination of one of Greece’s most powerful and dynamic cities. By taking a broad view, the book’s account speaks to larger trends in the ancient Mediterranean world while also demonstrating how Thebes was unique in its ancient context. It provides an up-to-date examination of all available information: topographic, demographic, numismatic, epigraphic, archaeological and textual discussions provide the most complete, current picture of ancient Thebes and illustrate the value of an interdisciplinary approach.

Life and Death in Asia Minor in Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine Times

Studies in Archaeology and Bioarchaeology
Author: J. Rasmus Brandt,Erika Hagelberg,Gro Bjørnstad,Sven Ahrens
Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited
ISBN: 9781785703591
Category: Death
Page: 432
View: 1022

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"Life and Death in Asia Minor combines contributions in both archaeology and bioarchaeology in Asia Minor in the period ca. 200 BC-AD 1300 for the first time. The archaeology topics are wide-ranging including death and territory, death and landscape perception, death and urban transformations from pagan to Christian topography, changing tomb typologies, funerary costs, family organization, funerary rights, rituals and practices among pagans, Jews, and Christians, inhumation and Early Byzantine cremations and use and reuse of tombs. The bioarchaeology chapters use DNA, isotope and osteological analyses to discuss, both among children and adults, questions such as demography and death rates, pathology and nutrition, body actions, genetics, osteobiography, and mobility patterns and diet. The areas covered in Asia Minor include the sites of Hierapolis, Laodikeia, Aphrodisias, Tlos, Ephesos, Priene, Kyme, Pergamon, Amorion, Gordion, Bogazkale, and Arslantepe. The theoretical and methodological approaches used make it highly relevant for people working in other geographical areas and time periods. Many of the articles could be used as case studies in teaching at schools and universities. An important objective of the publication has been to see how the different types of results emerging from archaeological and natural science studies respectively could be integrated with each other and pose new questions on ancient societies, which were far more complex than historical and social studies of the past often manage to transmit"--Publisher description.

Transnationalism in Ancient and Medieval Societies

The Role of Cross-Border Trade and Travel
Author: Michael C. Howard
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786490330
Category: History
Page: 313
View: 4213

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While scholars have long documented the migration of people in ancient and medieval times, they have paid less attention to those who traveled across borders with some regularity. This study of early transnational relations explores the routine interaction of people across the boundaries of empires, tribal confederacies, kingdoms, and city-states, paying particular attention to the role of long-distance trade along the Silk Road and maritime trade routes. It examines the obstacles voyagers faced, including limited travel and communication capabilities, relatively poor geographical knowledge, and the dangers of a fragmented and shifting political landscape, and offers profiles of better-known transnational elites such as the Hellenic scholar Herodotus and the Venetian merchant Marco Polo, as well lesser known servants, merchants, and sailors. By revealing the important political, economic, and cultural role cross-border trade and travel played in ancient society, this work demonstrates that transnationalism is not unique to modern times. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

The Greeks

A Portrait of Self and Others
Author: Paul Cartledge
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191577839
Category: History
Page: 248
View: 1504

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This book provides an original and challenging answer to the question: 'Who were the Classical Greeks?' Paul Cartledge - 'one of the most theoretically alert, widely read and prolific of contemporary ancient historians' (TLS) - here examines the Greeks and their achievements in terms of their own self-image, mainly as it was presented by the supposedly objective historians: Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon. Many of our modern concepts as we understand them were invented by the Greeks: for example, democracy, theatre, philosophy, and history. Yet despite being our cultural ancestors in many ways, their legacy remains rooted in myth and the mental and material contexts of many of their achievements are deeply alien to our own ways of thinking and acting. The Greeks aims to explore in depth how the dominant group (adult, male, citizen) attempted, with limited success, to define themselves unambiguously in polar opposition to a whole series of 'Others' - non-Greeks, women, non-citizens, slaves and gods. This new edition contains an updated bibliography, a new chapter entitled 'Entr'acte: Others in Images and Images of Others', and a new afterword.

Archaeological Survey and the City


Author: Paul Johnson,Martin Millett
Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited
ISBN: 9781842175095
Category: History
Page: 357
View: 7121

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This volume results from a three-day seminar organised at the Faculty of Classics, Cambridge University from the 24-27 May 2010.

Archaeology

An Introduction
Author: Kevin Greene,Tom Moore
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136860290
Category: Social Science
Page: 416
View: 762

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Archaeology: An Introduction looks behind the popular aspects of archaeology such as the discovery and excavation of sites, the study of human remains and animal bones, radiocarbon dating, museums and 'heritage' displays, and reveals the methods used by archaeologists. It also explains how the subject emerged from an amateur pursuit in the eighteenth century into a serious discipline, and explores changing fashions in interpretation in recent decades. This fifth edition has been updated by a new co-author, Tom Moore, and continues to include key references and guidance to help new readers find their way through the ever expanding range of archaeological publications. It conveys the excitement of new archaeological discoveries that appear on television or in newspapers while helping readers to evaluate them by explaining the methods and theories that lie behind them. Above all, while serving as a lucid textbook, it remains a very accessible account that will interest a wide readership. In addition to drawing upon examples and case studies from many regions of the world and periods of the past, it incorporates the authors' own fieldwork, research and teaching and features a new four-colour text design and colour illustrations plus an additional 50 topic boxes. The comprehensive glossary and bibliography are complemented by a support website hosted by Routledge to assist further study and wider learning. It includes chapter overviews, a testbank of questions, powerpoint discussion questions, web-links to support material for every chapter plus an online glossary and image bank. New to the fifth edition: inclusion of the latest survey techniques updated material on the development in dating, DNA analysis, isotopes and population movement coverage of new themes such as identity and personhood how different societies are defined from an anthropological point of view and the implications of this for archaeological interpretation the impact of climate change and sustainability on heritage management more on the history of archaeology Visit the companion website at www.routledge.com/textbooks/greene for additional resources, including: chapter overviews a testbank of questions PowerPoint discussion questions links to support material for every chapter an online glossary and image bank

The Ancient City


Author: Arjan Zuiderhoek
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316683974
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 4918

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Greece and Rome were quintessentially urban societies. Ancient culture, politics and society arose and developed in the context of the polis and the civitas. In modern scholarship, the ancient city has been the subject of intense debates due to the strong association in Western thought between urbanism, capitalism and modernity. In this book, Arjan Zuiderhoek provides a survey of the main issues at stake in these debates, as well as a sketch of the chief characteristics of Greek and Roman cities. He argues that the ancient Greco-Roman city was indeed a highly specific form of urbanism, but that this does not imply that the ancient city was somehow 'superior' or 'inferior' to forms of urbanism in other societies, just (interestingly) different. The book is aimed primarily at students of ancient history and general readers, but also at scholars working on urbanism in other periods and places.

Sapiens

A Brief History of Humankind
Author: Yuval Noah Harari
Publisher: Signal
ISBN: 9780771038518
Category:
Page: 464
View: 3659

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Destined to become a modern classic in the vein of Guns, Germs, and Steel, Sapiens is a lively, groundbreaking history of humankind told from a unique perspective. 100,000 years ago, at least six species of human inhabited the earth. Today there is just one. Us. Homo Sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Why did our foraging ancestors come together to create cities and kingdoms? How did we come to believe in gods, nations, and human rights; to trust money, books, and laws; and to be enslaved by bureaucracy, timetables, and consumerism? And what will our world be like in the millennia to come? In Sapiens, Dr. Yuval Noah Harari spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to the radical -- and sometimes devastating -- breakthroughs of the Cognitive, Agricultural, and Scientific Revolutions. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, palaeontology, and economics, he explores how the currents of history have shaped our human societies, the animals and plants around us, and even our personalities. Have we become happier as history has unfolded? Can we ever free our behaviour from the heritage of our ancestors? And what, if anything, can we do to influence the course of the centuries to come? Bold, wide-ranging and provocative, Sapiens challenges everything we thought we knew about being human: our thoughts, our actions, our power...and our future.

Discoveries at Ephesus


Author: John Turtle Wood
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108080650
Category: History
Page: 594
View: 1776

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Published in 1877, an illustrated account of archaeological excavations at Ephesus by the discoverer of the Temple of Artemis.

The Trojans & Their Neighbours


Author: Trevor Bryce
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134272065
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 3999

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A central figure in both classical and ancient near Eastern fields, Trevor Bryce presents the first publication to focus on Troy’s neighbours and contemporaries as much as Troy itself. With the help of maps, charts and photographs, he unearths the secrets of this iconic ancient city. Beginning with an account of Troy’s involvement in The Iliad and the question of the historicity of the Trojan War, Trevor Bryce reveals how the recently discovered Hittite texts illuminate this question which has fascinated scholars and travellers since the Renaissance. Encompassing the very latest research, the city and its inhabitants are placed in historical context - and with its neighbours and contemporaries – to form a complete and vivid view of life within the Trojan walls and beyond from its beginning in c.3000 BC to its decline and obscurity in the Byzantine period. Documented here are the archaeological watershed discoveries from the Victorian era to the present that reveal, through Troy’s nine levels, the story of a metropolis punctuated by signs of economic prosperity, natural disaster, public revolt and war.