American Indians and the Law


Author: N. Bruce Duthu
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101157917
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 2621

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A perfect introduction to a vital subject very few Americans understand-the constitutional status of American Indians Few American s know that Indian tribes have a legal status unique among America's distinct racial and ethnic groups: they are sovereign governments who engage in relations with Congress. This peculiar arrangement has led to frequent legal and political disputes-indeed, the history of American Indians and American law has been one of clashing values and sometimes uneasy compromise. In this clear-sighted account, American Indian scholar N. Bruce Duthu explains the landmark cases in Indian law of the past two centuries. Exploring subjects as diverse as jurisdictional authority, control of environmental resources, and the regulations that allow the operation of gambling casinos, American Indians and the Law gives us an accessible entry point into a vital facet of Indian history.

The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears


Author: Theda Perdue,Michael D. Green
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780670031504
Category: History
Page: 189
View: 6437

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Documents the 1830s policy shift of the U.S. government through which it discontinued efforts to assimilate Native Americans in favor of forcibly relocating them west of the Mississippi, in an account that traces the decision's specific effect on the Cherokee Nation, U.S.-Indian relations, and contemporary society.

The Lakotas and the Black Hills

The Struggle for Sacred Ground
Author: Jeffrey Ostler
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101190280
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 7018

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The story of the Lakota Sioux's loss of their spiritual homelands and their remarkable legal battle to regain it The Lakota Indians counted among their number some of the most famous Native Americans, including Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. Their homeland was in the magnificent Black Hills in South Dakota, where they found plentiful game and held religious ceremonies at charged locations like Devil's Tower. Bullied by settlers and the U. S. Army, they refused to relinquish the land without a fight, most famously bringing down Custer at Little Bighorn. In 1873, though, on the brink of starvation, the Lakotas surrendered the Hills. But the story does not end there. Over the next hundred years, the Lakotas waged a remarkable campaign to recover the Black Hills, this time using the weapons of the law. In The Lakotas and the Black Hills, the latest addition to the Penguin Library of American Indian History, Jeffrey Ostler moves with ease from battlefields to reservations to the Supreme Court, capturing the enduring spiritual strength that bore the Lakotas through the worst times and kept alive the dream of reclaiming their cherished homeland.

Shadow Nations

Tribal Sovereignty and the Limits of Legal Pluralism
Author: Bruce Duthu
Publisher: OUP USA
ISBN: 0199735867
Category: Law
Page: 248
View: 9322

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In order to counter the steady erosion of tribal powers of self-government, this book argues for redirecting the trajectory of tribal-federal relations to better reflect the formative ethos of legal pluralism that operated in the nation's earliest years.

Holding Our World Together

Ojibwe Women and the Survival of Community
Author: Brenda J. Child
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101560258
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 1477

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A groundbreaking exploration of the remarkable women in Native American communities. Too often ignored or underemphasized in favor of their male warrior counterparts, Native American women have played a more central role in guiding their nations than has ever been understood. Many Native communities were, in fact, organized around women's labor, the sanctity of mothers, and the wisdom of female elders. In this well-researched and deeply felt account of the Ojibwe of Lake Superior and the Mississippi River, Brenda J. Child details the ways in which women have shaped Native American life from the days of early trade with Europeans through the reservation era and beyond. The latest volume in the Penguin Library of American Indian History, Holding Our World Together illuminates the lives of women such as Madeleine Cadotte, who became a powerful mediator between her people and European fur traders, and Gertrude Buckanaga, whose postwar community activism in Minneapolis helped bring many Indian families out of poverty. Drawing on these stories and others, Child offers a powerful tribute to the many courageous women who sustained Native communities through the darkest challenges of the last three centuries.

Uneven Ground

American Indian Sovereignty and Federal Law
Author: David Eugene Wilkins,K. Tsianina Lomawaima
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806133959
Category: Social Science
Page: 326
View: 831

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In the early 1970s, the federal government began recognizing self-determination for American Indian nations. As sovereign entities, Indian nations have been able to establish policies concerning health care, education, religious freedom, law enforcement, gaming, and taxation. David E. Wilkins and K. Tsianina Lomawaima discuss how the political rights and sovereign status of Indian nations have variously been respected, ignored, terminated, and unilaterally modified by federal lawmakers as a result of the ambivalent political and legal status of tribes under western law.

This Indian Country

American Indian Activists and the Place They Made
Author: Frederick Hoxie
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101595906
Category: History
Page: 496
View: 7839

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Frederick E. Hoxie, one of our most prominent and celebrated academic historians of Native American history, has for years asked his undergraduate students at the beginning of each semester to write down the names of three American Indians. Almost without exception, year after year, the names are Geronimo, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. The general conclusion is inescapable: Most Americans instinctively view Indians as people of the past who occupy a position outside the central narrative of American history. These three individuals were warriors, men who fought violently against American expansion, lost, and died. It’s taken as given that Native history has no particular relationship to what is conventionally presented as the story of America. Indians had a history too; but theirs was short and sad, and it ended a long time ago. In This Indian Country, Hoxie has created a bold and sweeping counter-narrative to our conventional understanding. Native American history, he argues, is also a story of political activism, its victories hard-won in courts and campaigns rather than on the battlefield. For more than two hundred years, Indian activists—some famous, many unknown beyond their own communities—have sought to bridge the distance between indigenous cultures and the republican democracy of the United States through legal and political debate. Over time their struggle defined a new language of “Indian rights” and created a vision of American Indian identity. In the process, they entered a dialogue with other activist movements, from African American civil rights to women’s rights and other progressive organizations. Hoxie weaves a powerful narrative that connects the individual to the tribe, the tribe to the nation, and the nation to broader historical processes. He asks readers to think deeply about how a country based on the values of liberty and equality managed to adapt to the complex cultural and political demands of people who refused to be overrun or ignored. As we grapple with contemporary challenges to national institutions, from inside and outside our borders, and as we reflect on the array of shifting national and cultural identities across the globe, This Indian Country provides a context and a language for understanding our present dilemmas.

Other Words

American Indian Literature, Law, and Culture
Author: Jace Weaver
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806133522
Category: Social Science
Page: 381
View: 643

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Eloh’, a Cherokee word, is usually translated by anthropologists as "religion," but it also simultaneously encompasses history, culture, knowledge, law, and land. In this provocative work, Jace Weaver interlaces these seemingly disparate meanings to form a coherent approach to Native American Studies. In nineteen interrelated chapters, Weaver presents a range of experiences shared by native peoples in the Americas, from the distant past to the uncertain future. He examines Indian creative output, from oral tradition to the postmodern wordplay of Gerald Vizenor, and brings to light previously overlooked texts. Weaver also tackles up-to-the-minute issues, including environmental crises, Native American spirituality, repatriation of Indian remains and cultural artifacts, and international human rights.

The Real All Americans

The Team That Changed a Game, a People, a Nation
Author: Sally Jenkins
Publisher: Anchor Books
ISBN: 0767926242
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 343
View: 2125

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Offers an inspirational portrait of the Native American football team of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, a championship squad that included the legendary Jim Thorpe and that defeated its Ivy League opponents, in a history that is set against a backdrop of the early days of football and the rise and fall of Coach Glenn "Pop" Warner. Reprint. 25,000 first printing.

The Rights of Indians and Tribes


Author: Stephen L. Pevar
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199913439
Category: Law
Page: 540
View: 9699

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The Rights of Indians and Tribes, first published in 1983, has sold over 100,000 copies and is the most popular resource in the field of Federal Indian Law. The book, which explains this complex subject in a clear and easy-to-understand way, is particularly useful for tribal advocates, government officials, students, practitioners of Indian law, and the general public. Numerous tribal leaders highly recommend this book. Incorporating a user-friendly question-and-answer format, The Rights of Indians and Tribes addresses the most significant legal issues facing Indians and Indian tribes today, including tribal sovereignty, the federal trust responsibility, the regulation of non-Indians on reservations, Indian treaties, the Indian Civil Rights Act, the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, and the Indian Child Welfare Act. This fully-updated new edition features an introduction by John Echohawk, Executive Director of the Native American Rights Fund.

The Trail of Tears


Author: Gloria Jahoda
Publisher: Wings
ISBN: 9780517146774
Category: History
Page: 356
View: 3112

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Discusses the American government's nineteenth-century policy of Indian removal, in which over fifty tribes were relocated from their homelands to the West, from the perspective of the Native Americans.

The Oxford Handbook of American Indian History


Author: Frederick E. Hoxie
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190614021
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 6320

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"Everything you know about Indians is wrong." As the provocative title of Paul Chaat Smith's 2009 book proclaims, everyone knows about Native Americans, but most of what they know is the fruit of stereotypes and vague images. The real people, real communities, and real events of indigenous America continue to elude most people. The Oxford Handbook of American Indian History confronts this erroneous view by presenting an accurate and comprehensive history of the indigenous peoples who lived-and live-in the territory that became the United States. Thirty-two leading experts, both Native and non-Native, describe the historical developments of the past 500 years in American Indian history, focusing on significant moments of upheaval and change, histories of indigenous occupation, and overviews of Indian community life. The first section of the book charts Indian history from before 1492 to European invasions and settlement, analyzing US expansion and its consequences for Indian survival up to the twenty-first century. A second group of essays consists of regional and tribal histories. The final section illuminates distinctive themes of Indian life, including gender, sexuality and family, spirituality, art, intellectual history, education, public welfare, legal issues, and urban experiences. A much-needed and eye-opening account of American Indians, this Handbook unveils the real history often hidden behind wrong assumptions, offering stimulating ideas and resources for new generations to pursue research on this topic.

The Inconvenient Indian

A Curious Account of Native People in North America
Author: Thomas King
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 1452940304
Category: Social Science
Page: 272
View: 3635

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In The Inconvenient Indian, Thomas King offers a deeply knowing, darkly funny, unabashedly opinionated, and utterly unconventional account of Indian–White relations in North America since initial contact. Ranging freely across the centuries and the Canada–U.S. border, King debunks fabricated stories of Indian savagery and White heroism, takes an oblique look at Indians (and cowboys) in film and popular culture, wrestles with the history of Native American resistance and his own experiences as a Native rights activist, and articulates a profound, revolutionary understanding of the cumulative effects of ever-shifting laws and treaties on Native peoples and lands. Suffused with wit, anger, perception, and wisdom, The Inconvenient Indian is at once an engaging chronicle and a devastating subversion of history, insightfully distilling what it means to be “Indian” in North America. It is a critical and personal meditation that sees Native American history not as a straight line but rather as a circle in which the same absurd, tragic dynamics are played out over and over again. At the heart of the dysfunctional relationship between Indians and Whites, King writes, is land: “The issue has always been land.” With that insight, the history inflicted on the indigenous peoples of North America—broken treaties, forced removals, genocidal violence, and racist stereotypes—sharpens into focus. Both timeless and timely, The Inconvenient Indian ultimately rejects the pessimism and cynicism with which Natives and Whites regard one another to chart a new and just way forward for Indians and non-Indians alike.

Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier


Author: Timothy John Shannon
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780670018970
Category: History
Page: 260
View: 3122

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A vivid portrait of the Iroquois nation during colonial America offers insight into their formidable influence over regional politics, their active participation in period trade, and their neutral stance throughout the Anglo-French imperial wars. 15,000 first printing.

The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee

Native America from 1890 to the Present
Author: David Treuer
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698160819
Category: History
Page: 496
View: 8672

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A sweeping history--and counter-narrative--of Native American life from the Wounded Knee massacre to the present. Dee Brown's 1970 Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee was the first truly popular book of Indian history ever published. But it promulgated the impression that American Indian history essentially ended with the 1890 massacre at Wounded Knee--that not only did one hundred fifty Sioux die at the hands of the U. S. Cavalry but Native civilization did as well. Growing up Ojibwe on a reservation in Minnesota, training as an anthropologist, and researching Native life past and present for his nonfiction and novels, David Treuer has uncovered a different narrative. Because they did not disappear--and not despite but rather because of their intense struggles to preserve their language, their traditions, their families, and their very existence--the story of American Indians since the end of the nineteenth century to the present is one of unprecedented resourcefulness and reinvention. In The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee, Treuer melds history with reportage and memoir. Tracing the tribes' distinctive cultures to first contact, he traces how the depredations of each era spawned new modes of survival. The devastating siezures of land gave rise to an increasingly sophisticated legal and political maneuvering that put the lie to the myth that Indians don't know or care about property. The forced assimilation of their children at government-run boarding schools incubated a unifying Native identity. Conscription in the US military and the pull of urban life brought Indians into the mainstream and modern times, even as it steered the emerging shape of self-rule and spawned a new generation of resistance. Photographs, maps, and other visuals, from period advertisements to little-known historical photos, amplify the sense of discovering a fascinating and heretofore untold story. The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee is an essential, intimate history--and counter-narrative--of a resilient people in a transformative era.

The Penguin History of the United States of America


Author: Hugh Brogan
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141937459
Category: History
Page: 752
View: 4648

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This new edition of Brogan's superb one-volume history - from early British colonisation to the Reagan years - captures an array of dynamic personalities and events. In a broad sweep of America's triumphant progress. Brogan explores the period leading to Independence from both the American and the British points of view, touching on permanent features of 'the American character' - both the good and the bad. He provides a masterly synthesis of all the latest research illustrating America's rapid growth from humble beginnings to global dominance.

American Indian History Day by Day

A Reference Guide to Events
Author: Roger M. Carpenter
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313382220
Category: History
Page: 429
View: 7838

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This unique, day-by-day compilation of important events helps students understand and appreciate five centuries of Native American history. * A chronology provides an at-a-glance overview of 500 years of Native American history * A bibliography that guides students and other researchers to print and online resources for further information

Indian removal

the emigration of the Five Civilized Tribes of Indians
Author: Grant Foreman
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Five Civilized Tribes
Page: 423
View: 3020

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The forcible uprooting and expulsion of the 60,000 Indians comprising the Five Civilized Tribes, including the Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, Cherokee, and Seminole, unfolded a story that was unparalleled in the history of the United States. The tribes were relocated to Oklahoma and there were chroniclers to record the events and tragedy along the "Trail of Tears."

North American Indians


Author: George Catlin
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780142437506
Category: History
Page: 522
View: 8522

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Briefly describes Catlin's life and career, and shares his observations of the Great Plains Indians during the 1830s.