Alone Together

Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other
Author: Sherry Turkle
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465093663
Category: Psychology
Page: 400
View: 5886

Continue Reading →

"Savvy and insightful." --New York Times Technology has become the architect of our intimacies. Online, we fall prey to the illusion of companionship, gathering thousands of Twitter and Facebook friends, and confusing tweets and wall posts with authentic communication. But this relentless connection leads to a deep solitude. MIT professor Sherry Turkle argues that as technology ramps up, our emotional lives ramp down. Based on hundreds of interviews and with a new introduction taking us to the present day, Alone Together describes changing, unsettling relationships between friends, lovers, and families.

Alone Together

Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other
Author: Sherry Turkle
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 1459609026
Category: Human-computer interaction
Page: 680
View: 7774

Continue Reading →

Consider Facebook - it's human contact, only easier to engage with and easier to avoid. Developing technology promises closeness. Sometimes it delivers, but much of our modern life leaves us less connected with people and more connected to simulations of them. In Alone Together, MIT technology and society professor Sherry Turkle explores the power of our new tools and toys to dramatically alter our social lives. It's a nuanced exploration of what we are looking for - and sacrificing - in a world of electronic companions and social networking tools, and an argument that, despite the hand-waving of today's self-described prophets of the future, it will be the next generation who will chart the path between isolation and connectivity.

Alone Together

Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other
Author: Sherry Turkle
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465022340
Category: Psychology
Page: 384
View: 2544

Continue Reading →

Consider Facebook—it’s human contact, only easier to engage with and easier to avoid. Developing technology promises closeness. Sometimes it delivers, but much of our modern life leaves us less connected with people and more connected to simulations of them. In Alone Together, MIT technology and society professor Sherry Turkle explores the power of our new tools and toys to dramatically alter our social lives. It’s a nuanced exploration of what we are looking for—and sacrificing—in a world of electronic companions and social networking tools, and an argument that, despite the hand-waving of today’s self-described prophets of the future, it will be the next generation who will chart the path between isolation and connectivity.

Reclaiming Conversation

The Power of Talk in a Digital Age
Author: Sherry Turkle
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143109790
Category: FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS
Page: 448
View: 8803

Continue Reading →

Preeminent author and researcher Sherry Turkle has been studying digital culture for over thirty years. Long an enthusiast for its possibilities, here she investigates a troubling consequence: that we have stopped having face-to-face conversation in favour of technological connections such as texts or emails. Based on five years of research and interviews in homes, schools and the workplace, Turkle argues here that we now have a better understanding of this phenomenon, and that going forward, it's time we reclaim conversation, the most human thing that we do.

The Second Self

Computers and the Human Spirit
Author: Sherry Turkle
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262250675
Category: Computers
Page: 386
View: 6809

Continue Reading →

In The Second Self, Sherry Turkle looks at the computer not as a "tool," but as part of our social and psychological lives; she looks beyond how we use computer games and spreadsheets to explore how the computer affects our awareness of ourselves, of one another, and of our relationship with the world. "Technology," she writes, "catalyzes changes not only in what we do but in how we think." First published in 1984, The Second Self is still essential reading as a primer in the psychology of computation. This twentieth anniversary edition allows us to reconsider two decades of computer culture -- to (re)experience what was and is most novel in our new media culture and to view our own contemporary relationship with technology with fresh eyes. Turkle frames this classic work with a new introduction, a new epilogue, and extensive notes added to the original text.Turkle talks to children, college students, engineers, AI scientists, hackers, and personal computer owners -- people confronting machines that seem to think and at the same time suggest a new way for us to think -- about human thought, emotion, memory, and understanding. Her interviews reveal that we experience computers as being on the border between inanimate and animate, as both an extension of the self and part of the external world. Their special place betwixt and between traditional categories is part of what makes them compelling and evocative. (In the introduction to this edition, Turkle quotes a PDA user as saying, "When my Palm crashed, it was like a death. I thought I had lost my mind.") Why we think of the workings of a machine in psychological terms -- how this happens, and what it means for all of us -- is the ever more timely subject of The Second Self.

Life on the Screen


Author: Sherry Turkle
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439127115
Category: Science
Page: 352
View: 1186

Continue Reading →

Life on the Screen is a book not about computers, but about people and how computers are causing us to reevaluate our identities in the age of the Internet. We are using life on the screen to engage in new ways of thinking about evolution, relationships, politics, sex, and the self. Life on the Screen traces a set of boundary negotiations, telling the story of the changing impact of the computer on our psychological lives and our evolving ideas about minds, bodies, and machines. What is emerging, Turkle says, is a new sense of identity—as decentered and multiple. She describes trends in computer design, in artificial intelligence, and in people’s experiences of virtual environments that confirm a dramatic shift in our notions of self, other, machine, and world. The computer emerges as an object that brings postmodernism down to earth.

Simulation and Its Discontents


Author: Sherry Turkle
Publisher: MIT Press (MA)
ISBN: 9780262012706
Category: Computers
Page: 217
View: 3725

Continue Reading →

How the simulation and visualization technologies so pervasive in science,engineering, and design have changed our way of seeing the world.

The End of Absence

Reclaiming What We've Lost in a World of Constant Connection
Author: Michael John Harris
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698150589
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 5484

Continue Reading →

Soon enough, nobody will remember life before the Internet. What does this unavoidable fact mean? Those of us who have lived both with and without the crowded connectivity of online life have a rare opportunity. We can still recognize the difference between Before and After. We catch ourselves idly reaching for our phones at the bus stop. Or we notice how, midconversation, a fumbling friend dives into the perfect recall of Google. In this eloquent and thought-provoking book, Michael Harris argues that amid all the changes we're experiencing, the most interesting is the end of absence-the loss of lack. The daydreaming silences in our lives are filled; the burning solitudes are extinguished. There's no true "free time" when you carry a smartphone. Today's rarest commodity is the chance to be alone with your thoughts. Michael Harris is an award-winning journalist and a contributing editor at Western Living and Vancouvermagazines. He lives in Toronto, Canada.

Addiction by Design

Machine Gambling in Las Vegas
Author: Natasha Dow Schüll
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691127557
Category: Computers
Page: 442
View: 4740

Continue Reading →

machines stems from the consumer, the product, or the interplay between the two. --

Obfuscation

A User's Guide for Privacy and Protest
Author: Finn Brunton,Helen Nissenbaum
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262331322
Category: Computers
Page: 136
View: 3605

Continue Reading →

With Obfuscation, Finn Brunton and Helen Nissenbaum mean to start a revolution. They are calling us not to the barricades but to our computers, offering us ways to fight today's pervasive digital surveillance -- the collection of our data by governments, corporations, advertisers, and hackers. To the toolkit of privacy protecting techniques and projects, they propose adding obfuscation: the deliberate use of ambiguous, confusing, or misleading information to interfere with surveillance and data collection projects. Brunton and Nissenbaum provide tools and a rationale for evasion, noncompliance, refusal, even sabotage -- especially for average users, those of us not in a position to opt out or exert control over data about ourselves. Obfuscation will teach users to push back, software developers to keep their user data safe, and policy makers to gather data without misusing it.Brunton and Nissenbaum present a guide to the forms and formats that obfuscation has taken and explain how to craft its implementation to suit the goal and the adversary. They describe a series of historical and contemporary examples, including radar chaff deployed by World War II pilots, Twitter bots that hobbled the social media strategy of popular protest movements, and software that can camouflage users' search queries and stymie online advertising. They go on to consider obfuscation in more general terms, discussing why obfuscation is necessary, whether it is justified, how it works, and how it can be integrated with other privacy practices and technologies.

Intimacy and Friendship on Facebook


Author: A. Lambert
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137287144
Category: Social Science
Page: 201
View: 6848

Continue Reading →

Intimacy and Friendship on Facebook theorises the impact of Facebook on our social lives through the lens of intimacy. Lambert constructs an original understanding of why people welcome public intimacy on Facebook and how they attempt to control it, asking the reader to re-imagine what it means to be intimate online.

Pressed for Time

The Acceleration of Life in Digital Capitalism
Author: Judy Wajcman
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022619647X
Category: Computers
Page: 215
View: 9812

Continue Reading →

[Here], Judy Wajcman explains why we immediately interpret our experiences with digital technology as inexorably accelerating everyday life. She argues that we are not mere hostages to communication devices, and the sense of always being rushed is the result of the priorities and parameters we ourselves set rather than the machines that help us set them. ..."--Book jacket.

Smarter Than You Think

How Technology Is Changing Our Minds for the Better
Author: Clive Thompson
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101638710
Category: Technology & Engineering
Page: 352
View: 7963

Continue Reading →

A revelatory and timely look at how technology boosts our cognitive abilities—making us smarter, more productive, and more creative than ever It’s undeniable—technology is changing the way we think. But is it for the better? Amid a chorus of doomsayers, Clive Thompson delivers a resounding “yes.” In Smarter Than You Think, Thompson shows that every technological innovation—from the written word to the printing press to the telegraph—has provoked the very same anxieties that plague us today. We panic that life will never be the same, that our attentions are eroding, that culture is being trivialized. But, as in the past, we adapt—learning to use the new and retaining what is good of the old. Smarter Than You Think embraces and extols this transformation, presenting an exciting vision of the present and the future. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Forensic Analytics

Methods and Techniques for Forensic Accounting Investigations
Author: Mark Nigrini
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781118087633
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 480
View: 6425

Continue Reading →

Discover how to detect fraud, biases, or errors in your data using Access or Excel With over 300 images, Forensic Analytics reviews and shows how twenty substantive and rigorous tests can be used to detect fraud, errors, estimates, or biases in your data. For each test, the original data is shown with the steps needed to get to the final result. The tests range from high-level data overviews to assess the reasonableness of data, to highly focused tests that give small samples of highly suspicious transactions. These tests are relevant to your organization, whether small or large, for profit, nonprofit, or government-related. Demonstrates how to use Access, Excel, and PowerPoint in a forensic setting Explores use of statistical techniques such as Benford's Law, descriptive statistics, correlation, and time-series analysis to detect fraud and errors Discusses the detection of financial statement fraud using various statistical approaches Explains how to score locations, agents, customers, or employees for fraud risk Shows you how to become the data analytics expert in your organization Forensic Analytics shows how you can use Microsoft Access and Excel as your primary data interrogation tools to find exceptional, irregular, and anomalous records.

Utopia Is Creepy: And Other Provocations


Author: Nicholas Carr
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393254550
Category: Technology & Engineering
Page: 320
View: 8083

Continue Reading →

A freewheeling, sharp-shooting indictment of a tech-besotted culture. With razor wit, Nicholas Carr cuts through Silicon Valley’s unsettlingly cheery vision of the technological future to ask a hard question: Have we been seduced by a lie? Gathering a decade’s worth of posts from his blog, Rough Type, as well as his seminal essays, Utopia Is Creepy is “Carr’s best hits for those who missed the last decade of his stream of thoughtful commentary about our love affair with technology and its effect on our relationships” (Richard Cytowic, New York Journal of Books). Carr draws on artists ranging from Walt Whitman to the Clash, while weaving in the latest findings from science and sociology. Carr’s favorite targets are those zealots who believe so fervently in computers and data that they abandon common sense. Cheap digital tools do not make us all the next Fellini or Dylan. Social networks, diverting as they may be, are not vehicles for self-enlightenment. And “likes” and retweets are not going to elevate political discourse. Utopia Is Creepy compels us to question the technological momentum that has trapped us in its flow. “Resistance is never futile,” argues Carr, and this book delivers the proof.

Interpersonal Divide

The Search for Community in a Technological Age
Author: Michael J. Bugeja
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195173390
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 226
View: 7747

Continue Reading →

Electronic communication now keeps us connected, wired, and cabled to the entire world. Why, then, do we often feel displaced and increasingly isolated in the global village? Interpersonal Divide: The Search for Community in a Technological Age seeks to answer the question: have media and technology created a social gap, eroding our sense of community? Author Michael Bugeja tackles this question by taking a broad and interdisciplinary approach, incorporating a number of different viewpoints, including global, ethical, philosophical, corporate, pop cultural, and sociological perspectives. Bugeja analyses the 'interpersonal divide', the void that develops between people when we spend too much time in virtual rather than in real communities, and makes a case for face-to-face communication in a technological world. He traces media history to show how other generations have coped with similar problems during periods of great technological change, recommending ways to 'repatriate to the village.'* Focuses on a pertinent issue--the erosion of community in the face of media and technology--that connects to a variety of topics, yet that many college texts cannot thoroughly explore.* Journal exercises, discussion and paper ideas, and suggested readings at the end of each chapter help students develop awareness about the impact of media and technology on their own lives, as well as the society around them.* Bugeja draws on information from a spectrum of viewpoints, including ethical, pop cultural, historical, corporate, familial, and communal perspectives.* While using contemporary examples to validate arguments, Bugeja primarily focuses on the philosophical motivations and history behind the issues raised, rather than going into heavy detail of specific events.* Can be used in a number of different media/communications courses, including Media and Society, Media Ethics, History of Media, and New Communications Technology.Supplements and Resources:Companion Web Site: www.interpersonal-divide.org* Features information about the book* New material for lecture or discussion* 100 page Instructor's ManualContents:Introduction: The Need to BelongChapter One: Displacement in the Global Village1. High-Tech and Original Habitats2. The Interpersonal Divide3. Big Box Displacement4. Loss of Perspective5. A Lifelong QuestChapter Two: The Human Condition1. Peace and Empowerment2. Survival in Virtual Environments3. The Marketing of Self-Help4. The Ethics of Our Condition5. Convenience Over ConscienceChapter Three: Habits of a High-Tech Age1. The Hype of Self-Help2. Seven Habits of Highly Mediated People3. The Accelerated Biological Clock4. Wondering What Is RealChapter Four: Impact of Media and Technology1. The Real and Virtual Real2. The Dawning of Mass Media3. The Advent of Marketing4. Vision and ValuesChapter Five: Blurring of Identity and Place1. The Disembodied Self2. Mapping the Consumer Genome3. Moral and Social Upheaval4. Endangered HabitatsChapter Six: The Medium is the Moral1. McLuhan, Revisited2. The New Generation Gap3. The Unnatural Order of ThingsChapter Seven: Icons and Caricatures1. Icons and Idols2. Icons and Advertising3. Mentors and CaricaturesChapter Eight: Living Three Dimensionally1. Virtues and Environments2. The Moral Importance of Place3. Dimensions of CommunityChapter Nine: Repatriation to the Village1. Ethical Inventories2. Foci of Our Discontent3. Mis-Mediated Messages4. A Place in the VillageNotesIndex

The Inner History of Devices


Author: Sherry Turkle
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262291568
Category: Technology & Engineering
Page: 224
View: 3224

Continue Reading →

For more than two decades, in such landmark studies as The Second Self and Life on the Screen, Sherry Turkle has challenged our collective imagination with her insights about how technology enters our private worlds. In The Inner History of Devices, she describes her process, an approach that reveals how what we make is woven into our ways of seeing ourselves. She brings together three traditions of listening -- that of the memoirist, the clinician, and the ethnographer. Each informs the others to compose an inner history of devices. We read about objects ranging from cell phones and video poker to prosthetic eyes, from Web sites and television to dialysis machines. In an introductory essay, Turkle makes the case for an "intimate ethnography" that challenges conventional wisdom. One personal computer owner tells Turkle: "This computer means everything to me. It's where I put my hope." Turkle explains that she began that conversation thinking she would learn how people put computers to work. By its end, her question has changed: "What was there about personal computers that offered such deep connection? What did a computer have that offered hope?" The Inner History of Devices teaches us to listen for the answer. In the memoirs, ethnographies, and clinical cases collected in this volume, we read about an American student who comes to terms with her conflicting identities as she contemplates a cell phone she used in Japan ("Tokyo sat trapped inside it"); a troubled patient who uses email both to criticize her therapist and to be reassured by her; a compulsive gambler who does not want to win steadily at video poker because a pattern of losing and winning keeps her more connected to the body of the machine. In these writings, we hear untold stories. We learn that received wisdom never goes far enough.

Delete

The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age
Author: Viktor Mayer-Schönberger
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400838455
Category: Political Science
Page: 272
View: 5055

Continue Reading →

Delete looks at the surprising phenomenon of perfect remembering in the digital age, and reveals why we must reintroduce our capacity to forget. Digital technology empowers us as never before, yet it has unforeseen consequences as well. Potentially humiliating content on Facebook is enshrined in cyberspace for future employers to see. Google remembers everything we've searched for and when. The digital realm remembers what is sometimes better forgotten, and this has profound implications for us all. In Delete, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger traces the important role that forgetting has played throughout human history, from the ability to make sound decisions unencumbered by the past to the possibility of second chances. The written word made it possible for humans to remember across generations and time, yet now digital technology and global networks are overriding our natural ability to forget--the past is ever present, ready to be called up at the click of a mouse. Mayer-Schönberger examines the technology that's facilitating the end of forgetting--digitization, cheap storage and easy retrieval, global access, and increasingly powerful software--and describes the dangers of everlasting digital memory, whether it's outdated information taken out of context or compromising photos the Web won't let us forget. He explains why information privacy rights and other fixes can't help us, and proposes an ingeniously simple solution--expiration dates on information--that may. Delete is an eye-opening book that will help us remember how to forget in the digital age.

What Technology Wants


Author: Kevin Kelly
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143120174
Category: Technology & Engineering
Page: 406
View: 1717

Continue Reading →

Profiles technology as an evolving international system with predictable trends, counseling readers on how to prepare themselves and future generations by anticipating and steering their choices toward developing needs.

Kingpin

How One Hacker Took Over the Billion-Dollar Cybercrime Underground
Author: Kevin Poulsen
Publisher: Random House Digital, Inc.
ISBN: 0307588696
Category: Technology & Engineering
Page: 266
View: 6643

Continue Reading →

Documents how a troubled young computer hacker seized control of a massive international computer fraud network in 2006, tracing the efforts of FBI and Secret Service agents as well as an undercover operator to locate and arrest him. Reprint.