Aboriginal Australians

A History Since 1788
Author: Richard Broome
Publisher: Allen & Unwin
ISBN: 1741765544
Category: Social Science
Page: 507
View: 8861

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A powerful history of black and white encounters in Australia since colonization, this fully updated edition remains the only concise survey of Aboriginal history since 1788 In the creation of any new society, there are winners and losers. So it was with Australia as it grew from a colonial outpost to an affluent society. Richard Broome tells the history of Australia from the standpoint of the original Australians: those who lost most in the early colonial struggle for power. Surveying two centuries of Aboriginal-European encounters, he shows how white settlers steadily supplanted the original inhabitants, from the shining coasts to inland deserts, by sheer force of numbers, disease, technology, and violence. He also tells the story of Aboriginal survival through resistance and accommodation, and traces the continuing Aboriginal struggle to move from the margins of a settler society to a more central place in modern. Since its first edition in 1982, Broome'sAboriginal Australianshas won acclaim as a classic account of race relations in Australia. This fully rewritten fourth edition continues the story, covering the uneven implementation of native title, the plight of remote Aboriginal communities, the "Intervention," and the landmark apology to the "stolen generations" by Federal Parliament.

Aboriginal Australians

Black Responses to White Dominance, 1788-2001
Author: Richard Broome
Publisher: Allen & Unwin
ISBN: 1865087556
Category: History
Page: 330
View: 7933

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Aboriginal Australians is a powerful, comprehensive history of black-white encounters in Australia since colonisation, tracing the continuing Aboriginal struggle to move from the margins of colonial society to a more central place in modern Australia. Fully updated, it remains the only concise and up-to-date survey of Aboriginal history since 1788.

Performing Place, Practising Memories

Aboriginal Australians, Hippies and the State
Author: Rosita Henry
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 0857455095
Category: Social Science
Page: 288
View: 4201

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During the 1970s a wave of 'counter-culture' people moved into rural communities in many parts of Australia. This study focuses in particular on the town of Kuranda in North Queensland and the relationship between the settlers and the local Aboriginal population, concentrating on a number of linked social dramas that portrayed the use of both public and private space. Through their public performances and in their everyday spatial encounters, these people resisted the bureaucratic state but, in the process, they also contributed to the cultivation and propagation of state effects.

The French Explorers and the Aboriginal Australians 1772-1839


Author: Colin L. Dyer
Publisher: Univ. of Queensland Press
ISBN: 9780702235122
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 7836

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Opens a fascinating window - and a fresh perspective - on the early European exploration of Australia. These French explorers and scientists kept journals, many of which, until very recently, remained obscure and untranslated. Their cultural insights are invaluable, sometimes shocking and always engaging.

Dreamkeepers

A Spirit-Journey Into Aboriginal Australia
Author: Harvey Arden
Publisher: Perennial
ISBN: 9780060925802
Category: Religion
Page: 219
View: 4264

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Popular account of authors encounters with Aboriginal people and culture in the Kimberley and Great Sandy Desert; definition of Dreamtime, contemporary political background; based on conversations with Daisy Utemorrah, Ted Carlton, Jim Ward, Danny Wallace, George Wallaby, Reg Birch, Betty Johnston, Jack Rogers, Billy Oscar, Banjo Woorunmarra and David Mowaljarlai; visits to Wandjina art site, Waringarri, Mowanjum, Emu Creek, Kununurra, Balgo, Halls Creek and Yiyilu; relationship to land, parallels with native Americans; land rights; alcohol abuse; station life; mythology (eagle hawk, Billaluna region, Wandjina); mining industry; ATSIC; Christianity; law and punishment; healing; smoking ceremony; music; Pigeon (Jandamarra); Mowaljarlais Body of Australia vision.

Blood on the Wattle

Massacres and Maltreatment of Aboriginal Australians Since 1788
Author: Bruce Elder
Publisher: New Holland Pub Pty Limited
ISBN: 9781741100082
Category: History
Page: 309
View: 408

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Blood on the Wattle draws together, in a single volume, most of the information about the massacres of Aboriginal people which has been recorded in books and journals. It also creates a broad-based level of awareness of the scale of the massacres of Aboriginal people so that this dimension of Australian history can become part of the Australian consciousness.

Palaeopathology of Aboriginal Australians

Health and Disease Across a Hunter-Gatherer Continent
Author: Stephen Webb
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521110495
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 340
View: 9180

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While their health has suffered enormously because of the arrival of the Europeans, it is assumed that Aboriginal people enjoyed good health before 1788. Using data collected from all parts of the continent, this 1995 book studies the health of Australia's original inhabitants over 50,000 years. It represents the first continental survey of its kind and is the first to quantify and describe key aspects of Australian hunter-gatherer health. The book takes a theoretical approach to Upper Pleistocene regional epidemiology and presents empirical data of the health of late Pleistocene and Holocene populations. Major categories of disease described are: stress, osteoarthritis, fractures, congenital deformations, neoplasms and non-specific and treponemal infections. The author also describes surgical techniques used by Aboriginal people. Offering fresh insight into the study of Australian prehistory and Aboriginal culture, this book will be accessible to specialists and general readers alike. It illuminates the origins of human disease, and will fill a gap in our knowledge of health in the Australasian region.

Aboriginal Australia

An Introductory Reader in Aboriginal Studies
Author: Colin Bourke,Eleanor Bourke
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780702230516
Category: History
Page: 293
View: 6035

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With an analysis of the traditional, colonial, and contemporary experiences of indigenous Australians, this study examines various facets of the lives of Aboriginal Australians and shows how their struggles enrich the Australian community as a whole. Insightful and engaging, this reference presents an investigation on the continual struggle facing Aboriginals to maintain a strong identity and heritage while actively participating in and contributing to the modern world.

Aboriginal Australians

First Nations of an Ancient Continent
Author: Stephen Muecke,Adam Shoemaker
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780500301142
Category: Aboriginal Australians
Page: 127
View: 1067

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The book explores how the indigenous people actually came to be in Australia, and looks in depth at their extraordinary rituals and ‘Dreamings’, and the importance of ‘kin’ to their social structures. Much space is devoted to their massive cultural renaissance over the past four decades, with comprehensive coverage of the way in which Aboriginal art - be it Central Desert acrylic art, batik, contemporary urban painting, sculpture or traditional bark painting - has become a flagship for Australian culture.

Religion and Non-Religion among Australian Aboriginal Peoples


Author: James L. Cox,Adam Possamai
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317067959
Category: Religion
Page: 224
View: 3751

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Offering a significant contribution to the emerging field of 'Non-Religion Studies', Religion and Non-Religion among Australian Aboriginal Peoples draws on Australian 2011 Census statistics to ask whether the Indigenous Australian population, like the wider Australian society, is becoming increasingly secularised or whether there are other explanations for the surprisingly high percentage of Aboriginal people in Australia who state that they have 'no religion'. Contributors from a range of disciplines consider three central questions: How do Aboriginal Australians understand or interpret what Westerners have called 'religion'? Do Aboriginal Australians distinguish being 'religious' from being 'non-religious'? How have modernity and Christianity affected Indigenous understandings of 'religion'? These questions re-focus Western-dominated concerns with the decline or revival of religion, by incorporating how Indigenous Australians have responded to modernity, how modernity has affected Indigenous peoples' religious behaviours and perceptions, and how variations of response can be found in rural and urban contexts.

The Aboriginal Australians

The First Pioneers
Author: Catherine Helen Berndt,Ronald Murray Berndt
Publisher: Pitman Publishing
ISBN: N.A
Category: Aboriginal Australians
Page: 151
View: 4527

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Traditional lifestyle; social framework and kinship; sex roles; relationship with land; childhood; marriage; religion; art; contact and conflict; identity; contemporary issues.

Aboriginal Australia and the Torres Strait Islands


Author: Sarina Singh
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781864501148
Category: Travel
Page: 448
View: 7086

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This guide is ideal for travellers who want to understand Australia's 50,000-year-old cultural tradition. More than 60 Indigenous people have contributed to this guide, together with some of Lonely Planet's most experienced guidebook researchers. Includes an introduction to Indigenous languages.

Aboriginal Biocultural Knowledge in South-eastern Australia

Perspectives of Early Colonists
Author: Fred Cahir,Ian Clark,Philip Clarke
Publisher: CSIRO PUBLISHING
ISBN: 1486306136
Category: Science
Page: 360
View: 6768

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Indigenous Australians have long understood sustainable hunting and harvesting, seasonal changes in flora and fauna, predator–prey relationships and imbalances, and seasonal fire management. Yet the extent of their knowledge and expertise has been largely unknown and underappreciated by non-Aboriginal colonists, especially in the south-east of Australia where Aboriginal culture was severely fractured. Aboriginal Biocultural Knowledge in South-eastern Australia is the first book to examine historical records from early colonists who interacted with south-eastern Australian Aboriginal communities and documented their understanding of the environment, natural resources such as water and plant and animal foods, medicine and other aspects of their material world. This book provides a compelling case for the importance of understanding Indigenous knowledge, to inform discussions around climate change, biodiversity, resource management, health and education. It will be a valuable reference for natural resource management agencies, academics in Indigenous studies and anyone interested in Aboriginal culture and knowledge.

Belonging

Australians, Place and Aboriginal Ownership
Author: Peter Read
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521774093
Category: History
Page: 248
View: 3344

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This extraordinary book explores the feelings of non-Aboriginal Australians as they articulate their sense of belonging to the land. Peter Read asks the pivotal questions: What is the meaning of places important to non-Aboriginal Australians from which the Indigenous people have already been dispossessed? How are contemporary Australians thinking through the problem of knowing that their places of attachment are also the places which Aboriginals loved--and lost? And are the sites of all our deep affections to be contested, articulated, shared, foregone or possessed absolutely?

Continent of Hunter-Gatherers

New Perspectives in Australian Prehistory
Author: Harry Lourandos
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521359467
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 390
View: 3117

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This book challenges traditional perceptions of Australian Aboriginal prehistory: that environment is the major determinant of hunter-gatherers; that Aborigines were egalitarian and culturally homogeneous; that they experienced few economic and demographic changes. Lourandos argues that their social and economic processes were complex and that the prehistory period was dynamic. Lourandos considers colonization, Tasmanian Aborigines, the role of fire, the intensification debate, plant exploitation and other prehistoric hunter-gatherer societies.

Secrets of Aboriginal Healing

A Physicist's Journey with a Remote Australian Tribe
Author: Gary Holz
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1591437539
Category: Body, Mind & Spirit
Page: 128
View: 6163

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A guide to the 60,000-year-old healing system of the Aborigines revealed through one man’s journey to overcome multiple sclerosis • Written at the request of the Aboriginal people the author stayed with • Explores the use of dreamtime, spirit guides, and telepathy to discover and reprogram the subconscious motivations, thought patterns, and beliefs behind illness • Reveals how to tap in to healing support through the body/mind/spirit connection • Nautilus Silver Medal Winner and ForeWord Reviews Book of the Year Finalist In 1983 award-winning physicist Gary Holz was diagnosed with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. By 1988 he was a quadriplegic. Then, in 1994, his doctors told him he had two years to live. Desperate and depressed, he followed a synchronistic suggestion and went to Australia to live with a remote Aboriginal tribe. Arriving in a wheelchair, alone, with almost no feeling left from the neck down, Holz embarked on a remarkable healing transformation of body, mind, and spirit and discovered his own gift for healing others. Written at the request of the Aboriginal healers Holz worked with, this book reveals the beliefs and principles of the 60,000-year-old healing system of the Aborigines of Australia, the world’s oldest continuous culture. Chronicling the step-by-step process that led to his miraculous recovery, he explains the role played by thought in the creation of health or disease and details the five essential steps in the Aboriginal healing process. He explores the use of dreamtime, spirit guides, and telepathy to discover and reprogram the subconscious motivations behind illness--a process that enacts healing at the cellular and the soul level, where the root of physical illness is found. Supported by modern science, including quantum physics, Aboriginal medicine enables each of us to tap in to healing support through the power of the body/mind/spirit connection.

Language and Culture in Aboriginal Australia


Author: Michael Walsh,Colin Yallop
Publisher: Aboriginal Studies Press
ISBN: 0855752416
Category: Foreign Language Study
Page: 226
View: 4141

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What are the Australian Aboriginal languages like? How many are there? Where are they spoken? Are there dictionaries of Aboriginal languages? What kinds of new language have emerged in the last two hundred years? What is the connection between land, people and language in Aboriginal Australia? How does the use of English disadvantage Aboriginal people? This book offers answers these questions by providing a series of studies of aspects of language and culture in different parts of Aboriginal Australia. Chapters deal with subjects including why a young Aboriginal woman in rural Australia might end up pleading guilty to a crime she didn't commit; the picture of 'language ownership' which can be drawn from recent research on land rights; what we know of the first white settlers' attempts to learn the language of the Sydney region; the first dictionaries compiled in South Australia; and how Aboriginal languages are now being used in the media and education. Each study contributes to a composite Australia-wide picture of language and culture in Aboriginal Australia, accessible to anyone with an interest in the area. The book is of particular use to teachers and students involved in Aboriginal studies in the upper secondary years and at introductory levels in universities. Its value as an educational resource is enhanced by bibliographical reference, maps, and questions for further discussion at the end of each chapter.

Out of Australia

Aborigines, the Dreamtime, and the Dawn of the Human Race
Author: Steven Strong,Evan Strong
Publisher: Hampton Roads Publishing
ISBN: 1612833934
Category: Body, Mind & Spirit
Page: 240
View: 2145

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In their startling new book, Steven and Evan Strong challenge the “out-of-Africa” theory. Based on fresh examination of both the DNA and archeological evidence, they conclude that modern humans originated from Australia, not Africa. The original Australians (referred to by some as Aborigines ), like so many indigenous peoples, are portrayed as “backward” and “primitive.” Yet, as the Strongs demonstrate, original Australians had a rich culture, which may have sown the first seeds of spirituality in the world. They had the technology to make international seafaring voyages and have left traces in the Americas and possibly Japan, Southern India, Egypt, and elsewhere. They practiced brain surgery, invented the first hand tools, and had knowledge of penicillin. This book brings together 30 years of intensive research in consultation with elders in the original Australian community. Among their conclusions are the following: There is evidence that humans existed in Australia 40,000 years before they existed in Australia. There were migrations of original Australians in large boats throughout the Indian/Pacific rim. Three distinct kinds of Homo sapiens are found in Australia. There is evidence from the Americas that debunks the out-of-Africa theory. The spiritual influence of the Aborigines is reflected in the religions of the world.

Indigenous Australians and the National Disability Insurance Scheme


Author: Nicholas Biddle,Fadwa Al-Yaman,Michelle Gourley,M Gray,J. R. Bray,B. Brady,L. A. Pham,E. Williams,M. Montaigne
Publisher: ANU Press
ISBN: 1925021890
Category: Social Science
Page: 532
View: 5565

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The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is one of the major policy innovations of the early 21st century in Australia, representing a new way of delivering services to people with a disability and those who care for them. It has the potential to transform the lives of hundreds of thousands of people, giving them greater certainty and control over their lives. There is a higher incidence of disability in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population than in the Australian population more generally, so the NDIS is of particular relevance to Indigenous Australians. However, Indigenous Australians with a disability have a very distinct age, geographic and health profile, which differs from that of the equivalent non-Indigenous population. Furthermore, the conceptualisation of disability and care in many Indigenous communities, particularly in remote areas, may differ markedly in comparison to more settled parts of the country, and there is the added complexity of a unique history of interaction with government. In considering these issues in detail, this Research Monograph provides a resource for policy makers, researchers and service providers who are working in this important policy area. Its major conclusion is that the NDIS, if it is to be an effective policy for Indigenous Australians, needs to take into account their very particular needs and aspirations.

Aboriginal Australians

Spirit of Arnhem Land
Author: Penny Tweedie
Publisher: New Holland Pub Pty Limited
ISBN: 9781864367461
Category: Social Science
Page: 168
View: 1194

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