A World Full of Emotions

Ancient Greece, 700 BC-200 AD
Author: Angelos Chaniotis,Nikolaos Kaltsas,Ioannis Mylonopoulos
Publisher: Onassis Foundation
ISBN: 9780981966656
Category: Architecture
Page: 255
View: 6862

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Emotions penetrate every aspect of our lives. Interwoven with memory, attention, cognition, and decision making, they determine our interpersonal relations, our private life, the public sphere, and religious worship. Emotions had a particular significance also in ancient Greek culture, as Greek intellectuals were the first to theorize emotions in the Western world. A World of Emotions familiarizes the reader with the ubiquitous presence of emotions in Greek culture and life as well as their importance for an understanding of Greek art, literature, history, political life, society, and religion. It reveals how emotions are experienced, expressed, and aroused, how they are controlled or enslave us, how they are manipulated or evaluated. In doing so, it is hoped that this catalogue will trigger thoughts about the importance of emotions in our world, and show why the study of emotions in Classical Antiquity may help us to better understand our contemporary social and cultural environment. The catalogue A World of Emotions: Ancient Greece, 700 BC-200 AD accompanies a homonymous exhibition displaying a wide array of archeological finds from major museums and institutions in Greece, Europe, and North America. The exhibition is organized by the Onassis Foundation USA.

Age of Conquests

The Greek World from Alexander to Hadrian (336 BC – AD 138)
Author: Angelos Chaniotis
Publisher: Profile Books
ISBN: 1847654215
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 6532

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The ancient world that Alexander the Great transformed in his lifetime was transformed once more by his death. The imperial dynasties of his successors incorporated and reorganized the fallen Persian empire, creating a new land empire stretching from the shores of the Mediterranean to as far east as Bactria. In old Greece a fragile balance of power was continually disturbed by wars. Then, from the late third century, the military and diplomatic power of Rome successively defeated and dismantled every one of the post-Alexandrian political structures. The Hellenistic period (c. 323-30 BC) was then one of fragmentation, violent antagonism between large states, and struggles by small polities to retain an illusion of independence. Yet it was also a period of growth, prosperity, and intellectual achievement. A vast network spread of trade, influence and cultural contact, from Italy to Afghanistan and from Russia to Ethiopia, enriching and enlivening centres of wealth, power and intellectual ferment. From Alexander the Great's early days building an empire, via wars with Rome, rampaging pirates, Cleopatra's death and the Jewish diaspora, right up to the death of Hadrian, Chaniotis examines the social structures, economic trends, political upheaval and technological progress of an era that spans five centuries and where, perhaps, modernity began.

Epigraphy of Art

Ancient Greek Vase-Inscriptions and Vase-Paintings
Author: Dimitrios Yatromanolakis
Publisher: Archaeopress Archaeology
ISBN: 9781784914868
Category:
Page: 216
View: 4342

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Ancient Greek vase-paintings offer broad-ranging and unprecedented early perspectives on the often intricate interplay of images and texts. By bringing together--for the first time in English-language scholarship--an international group of leading scholars in classical art and archaeology who have worked on vase-inscriptions, this book investigates epigraphic technicalities of Attic and non-Attic inscriptions on pottery as well as their broader iconographic and sociocultural significance. The ten chapters in this book propose original and expert methodological approaches to the study of vase-inscriptions and vasepaintings, while also foregrounding the outstanding but not fully examined importance of the area of vase-inscriptions for current research on ancient Greek visual representations. Epigraphy of Art: Ancient Greek Vase-Inscriptions and Vase-Paintings constitutes a major contribution to the fields of Greek epigraphy and classical art and archaeology and will prove significant for epigraphists, archaeologists, and art-historians interested in the complexities of the interaction of art and text.

Gods and Mortals at Mount Olympus

Ancient Finds from Dion, City of Zeus
Author: Dimitrios Pandermalis
Publisher: Onassis Foundation
ISBN: 9780990614227
Category:
Page: 160
View: 2505

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Edited by Dimitrios Pandermalis Essays by Katerina Boli, Angelos Chaniotis, Fritz Graf, Maria Katsakiori, Sophia Kremydi, Richard P. Martin, Dimitrios Pandermalis, and Semeli Pingiatoglou. Located on the eastern slopes of Mount Olympus and atop the bubbling source of the ancient river Baphyras, the city of Dion and its natural environment were interpreted by the ancient Greeks as divine. Dion's proximity to the gods was reflected in the cults and daily existence of local residents but also prompted the area's critical role in establishing the identity of the royal house of Philip and Alexander the Great. With Zeus Olympus as their principal deity, generations of royalty and their followers celebrated their dedication to the god with sanctuaries, festivals, temples, statues, and public buildings, transforming the city into a central sacred site and a monumental urban center. The exhibition presents highlights of the finds of the last fifty years of archaeological excavations and is organized by the Onassis Foundation (USA) and the Dion Excavations, in collaboration with the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports--Ephorate of Antiquities of Pieria.

Ancient Greece


Author: Thomas R. Martin
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300190638
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 5372

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DIVIn this compact yet comprehensive history of ancient Greece, Thomas R. Martin brings alive Greek civilization from its Stone Age roots to the fourth century B.C. Focusing on the development of the Greek city-state and the society, culture, and architecture of Athens in its Golden Age, Martin integrates political, military, social, and cultural history in a book that will appeal to students and general readers alike. Now in its second edition, this classic work now features new maps and illustrations, a new introduction, and updates throughout./divDIV /divDIV“A limpidly written, highly accessible, and comprehensive history of Greece and its civilizations from prehistory through the collapse of Alexander the Great’s empire. . . . A highly readable account of ancient Greece, particularly useful as an introductory or review text for the student or the general reader.�—Kirkus Reviews/divDIV /divDIV“A polished and informative work that will be useful for general readers and students.�—Daniel Tompkins, Temple University/divDIV/div

Women & Power

A Manifesto
Author: Mary Beard
Publisher: Profile Books
ISBN: 1782834532
Category: Social Science
Page: 74
View: 3141

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Number One Sunday Times Bestseller Why the popular resonance of 'mansplaining' (despite the intense dislike of the term felt by many men)? It hits home for us because it points straight to what it feels like not to be taken seriously: a bit like when I get lectured on Roman history on Twitter. Britain's best-known classicist Mary Beard, is also a committed and vocal feminist. With wry wit, she revisits the gender agenda and shows how history has treated powerful women. Her examples range from the classical world to the modern day, from Medusa and Athena to Theresa May and Hillary Clinton. Beard explores the cultural underpinnings of misogyny, considering the public voice of women, our cultural assumptions about women's relationship with power, and how powerful women resist being packaged into a male template. With personal reflections on her own experiences of the sexism and gendered aggression she has endured online, Mary asks: if women aren't perceived to be within the structures of power, isn't it power that we need to redefine? From the author of international bestseller SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome.

History of Western Philosophy

Collectors Edition
Author: Bertrand Russell
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135692912
Category: Philosophy
Page: 728
View: 3948

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Now in a special gift edition, and featuring a brand new foreword by Anthony Gottlieb, this is a dazzlingly unique exploration of the works of significant philosophers throughout the ages and a definitive must-have title that deserves a revered place on every bookshelf.

The Death of Carthage


Author: Robin E. Levin
Publisher: Trafford Publishing
ISBN: 1426996071
Category: Fiction
Page: 308
View: 5734

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The Death of Carthage tells the story of the Second and third Punic wars that took place between ancient Rome and Carthage in three parts. The first book, Carthage Must Be Destroyed, covering the second Punic war, is told in the first person by Lucius Tullius Varro, a young Roman of equestrian status who is recruited into the Roman cavalry at the beginning of the war in 218 BC. Lucius serves in Spain under the Consul Publius Cornelius Scipio and his brother, the Proconsul Cneius Cornelius Scipio. Captivus, the second book, is narrated by Lucius's first cousin Enneus, who is recruited to the Roman cavalry under Gaius Flaminius and taken prisoner by Hannibal's general Maharbal after the disastrous Roman defeat at Lake Trasimene in 217 BC. Enneus is transported to Greece and sold as a slave, where he is put to work as a shepherd on a large estate and establishes his life there. The third and final book, The Death of Carthage, is narrated by Enneus's son, Ectorius. As a rare bilingual, Ectorius becomes a translator and serves in the Roman army during the war and witnesses the total destruction of Carthage in the year 146 BC. This historical saga, full of minute details on day-to-day life in ancient times, depicts two great civilizations on the cusp of influencing the world for centuries to come.

The Berlin Painter and His World

Athenian Vase-Painting in the Early Fifth Century B. C.
Author: J. Michael Padgett,Nathan Arrington,J. Robert Guy,Jasper Gaunt
Publisher: Princeton University Art Museum
ISBN: 9780300225938
Category:
Page: 448
View: 8483

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The Berlin Painter was the name given by British classicist and art historian Sir John Beazley to an otherwise anonymous Athenian red-figure vase-painter. The artist's long career extended from about 505 B.C. well into the 460s, and his elegant renderings of daily life and mythological stories offer invaluable insight into the social, political, religious, and artistic workings of early 5th-century Athens. Since the first published identification of the artist in 1911, the Berlin Painter's oeuvre has grown to some 330 works, both complete pots and fragments, making him one of the best-known artists of his kind. This lavishly illustrated publication features nine essays by leading scholars who explore the artist's work, milieu, influence, and legacy, as well as the role of connoisseurship in art-historical scholarship. With an updated catalogue raisonn� that includes many newly attributed works, it is the definitive book on this seminal artist.

History of Humanity: From the third millennium to the seventh century B.C.


Author: Sigfried J. de Laet,Ahmad Hasan Dani
Publisher: UNESCO
ISBN: 9789231028113
Category: Civilization
Page: 569
View: 5651

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The second volume covers the first two and a half thousand years of recorded history, from the start of the Bronze Age 5,000 years ago to the beginnings of the Iron Age. Written by a team of over sixty specialists, this volume includes a comprehensive bibliography and a detailed index.

Religion in Human Evolution


Author: Robert N. Bellah
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674063090
Category: Religion
Page: 784
View: 2785

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This ambitious book probes our biological past to discover the kinds of lives that human beings have imagined were worth living. Bellah’s theory goes deep into cultural and genetic evolution to identify a range of capacities (communal dancing, storytelling, theorizing) whose emergence made religious development possible in the first millennium BCE.

Walk Through Walls

A Memoir
Author: Marina Abramovic
Publisher: Crown Archetype
ISBN: 1101905050
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 384
View: 3382

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“I had experienced absolute freedom—I had felt that my body was without boundaries, limitless; that pain didn’t matter, that nothing mattered at all—and it intoxicated me.” In 2010, more than 750,000 people stood in line at Marina Abramović’s MoMA retrospective for the chance to sit across from her and communicate with her nonverbally in an unprecedented durational performance that lasted more than 700 hours. This celebration of nearly fifty years of groundbreaking performance art demonstrated once again that Marina Abramović is truly a force of nature. The child of Communist war-hero parents under Tito’s regime in postwar Yugoslavia, she was raised with a relentless work ethic. Even as she was beginning to build an international artistic career, Marina lived at home under her mother’s abusive control, strictly obeying a 10 p.m. curfew. But nothing could quell her insatiable curiosity, her desire to connect with people, or her distinctly Balkan sense of humor—all of which informs her art and her life. The beating heart of Walk Through Walls is an operatic love story—a twelve-year collaboration with fellow performance artist Ulay, much of which was spent penniless in a van traveling across Europe—a relationship that began to unravel and came to a dramatic end atop the Great Wall of China. Marina’s story, by turns moving, epic, and dryly funny, informs an incomparable artistic career that involves pushing her body past the limits of fear, pain, exhaustion, and danger in an uncompromising quest for emotional and spiritual transformation. A remarkable work of performance in its own right, Walk Through Walls is a vivid and powerful rendering of the unparalleled life of an extraordinary artist.

The Shadow of the Parthenon

Studies in Ancient History and Literature
Author: Peter Green
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520934717
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 1682

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A lively combination of scholarship and unorthodoxy makes these studies in ancient history and literature unusually rewarding. Few of the objects of conventional admiration gain much support from Peter Green (Pericles and the "democracy" of fifth-century Athens are treated to a very cool scrutiny) but he has a warm regard for the real virtues of antiquity and for those who spoke with "an individual voice." The studies cover both history and literature, Greece and Rome. They range from the real nature of Athenian society to poets as diverse as Sappho and Juvenal, and all of them, without laboring any parallels, make the ancient world immediately relevant to our own. (There is, for example, a very perceptive essay on how classical history often becomes a vehicle for the historian's own political beliefs and fantasies of power.) The student of classical history will find plenty in this book to enrich his own studies. The general reader will enjoy the vision of a classical world which differs radically from what he probably expects.

The Persians


Author: Aeschylus
Publisher: Charles River Editors via PublishDrive
ISBN: 1531284345
Category: Drama
Page: 37
View: 2149

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Aeschylus was an ancient Greek tragedian who is often considered to be the father of tragedy. Aeschylus was one of only three ancient tragedians whose plays have survived. This edition of The Persians includes a table of contents.

Korea's Place in the Sun: A Modern History (Updated)


Author: Bruce Cumings
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393347532
Category: History
Page: 544
View: 4388

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"Passionate, cantankerous, and fascinating. Rather like Korea itself."--Nicholas D. Kristof, New York Times Book Review Korea has endured a "fractured, shattered twentieth century," and this updated edition brings Bruce Cumings's leading history of the modern era into the present. The small country, overshadowed in the imperial era, crammed against great powers during the Cold War, and divided and decimated by the Korean War, has recently seen the first real hints of reunification. But positive movements forward are tempered by frustrating steps backward. In the late 1990s South Korea survived its most severe economic crisis since the Korean War, forcing a successful restructuring of its political economy. Suffering through floods, droughts, and a famine that cost the lives of millions of people, North Korea has been labeled part of an "axis of evil" by the George W. Bush administration and has renewed its nuclear threats. On both sides Korea seems poised to continue its fractured existence on into the new century, with potential ramifications for the rest of the world.

The Fate of Rome

Climate, Disease, and the End of an Empire
Author: Kyle Harper
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400888913
Category: History
Page: 440
View: 6322

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A sweeping new history of how climate change and disease helped bring down the Roman Empire Here is the monumental retelling of one of the most consequential chapters of human history: the fall of the Roman Empire. The Fate of Rome is the first book to examine the catastrophic role that climate change and infectious diseases played in the collapse of Rome’s power—a story of nature’s triumph over human ambition. Interweaving a grand historical narrative with cutting-edge climate science and genetic discoveries, Kyle Harper traces how the fate of Rome was decided not just by emperors, soldiers, and barbarians but also by volcanic eruptions, solar cycles, climate instability, and devastating viruses and bacteria. He takes readers from Rome’s pinnacle in the second century, when the empire seemed an invincible superpower, to its unraveling by the seventh century, when Rome was politically fragmented and materially depleted. Harper describes how the Romans were resilient in the face of enormous environmental stress, until the besieged empire could no longer withstand the combined challenges of a “little ice age” and recurrent outbreaks of bubonic plague. A poignant reflection on humanity’s intimate relationship with the environment, The Fate of Rome provides a sweeping account of how one of history’s greatest civilizations encountered and endured, yet ultimately succumbed to the cumulative burden of nature’s violence. The example of Rome is a timely reminder that climate change and germ evolution have shaped the world we inhabit—in ways that are surprising and profound.

Greek Lyric Poetry

A New Translation
Author: Sherod Santos
Publisher: W W Norton & Company Incorporated
ISBN: 9780393329155
Category: Poetry
Page: 201
View: 964

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A collection of classical lyric poems is arranged into four periods including Classical, Hellenic, Roman, and Early Byzantine, in a volume that features the works of such ancient masters as Xenophanes, Callimachus, Sappho, Simonides, and Plato. Reprint.

Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome


Author: E.M. Berens
Publisher: Xist Publishing
ISBN: 1623959772
Category: Fiction
Page: 87
View: 1747

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Read the stories of Greek and Roman myths that inspired the Percy Jackson books and other retellings of mythology In E.M. Berens collection of Greek and Roman myths, the classical stories are brought to life in detail. This Xist Classics edition has been professionally formatted for e-readers with a linked table of contents. This eBook also contains a bonus book club leadership guide and discussion questions. We hope you’ll share this book with your friends, neighbors and colleagues and can’t wait to hear what you have to say about it. Xist Publishing is a digital-first publisher. Xist Publishing creates books for the touchscreen generation and is dedicated to helping everyone develop a lifetime love of reading, no matter what form it takes

The World Goes On


Author: László Krasznahorkai
Publisher: New Directions Publishing
ISBN: 0811224201
Category: Fiction
Page: 288
View: 6583

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A magnificent new collection of stories by “the contemporary Hungarian master of apocalypse” (Susan Sontag) In The World Goes On, a narrator first speaks directly, then tells eleven unforgettable stories, and then bids farewell (“for here I would leave this earth and these stars, because I would take nothing with me”). As László Krasznahoraki himself explains: “Each text is about drawing our attention away from this world, speeding our body toward annihilation, and immersing ourselves in a current of thought or a narrative…” A Hungarian interpreter obsessed with waterfalls, at the edge of the abyss in his own mind, wanders the chaotic streets of Shanghai. A traveler, reeling from the sights and sounds of Varanasi, encounters a giant of a man on the banks of the Ganges ranting on the nature of a single drop of water. A child laborer in a Portuguese marble quarry wanders off from work one day into a surreal realm utterly alien from his daily toils. The World Goes On is another amazing masterpiece by the winner of the 2015 Man Booker International Prize. “The excitement of his writing,” Adam Thirwell proclaimed in the New York Review of Books, “is that he has come up with this own original forms—there is nothing else like it in contemporary literature.”