A World Made New

Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Author: Mary Ann Glendon
Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks
ISBN: 0375760466
Category: History
Page: 333
View: 6585

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A new book on the beloved first lady chronicles the achievement she was most proud of--the Universal Declaration of Human Rights--and describes her intensive efforts to forge this powerful document in the turbulent period following World War II. Reprint. 25,000 first printing.

A World Made New

Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Author: Mary Ann Glendon
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 9780375506925
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 9617

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A World Made New tells the dramatic story of the struggle to build, out of the trauma and wreckage of World War II, a document that would ensure it would never happen again. There was an almost religious intensity to the project, championed by Eleanor Roosevelt under the aegis of the newly formed United nations and brought into being by an extraordinary group of men and women who knew, like the framers of the Declaration of Independence, that they were making history. They worked against the clock, the brief window between the end of World War II and the deep freeze of the cold war, to forget the founding document of the modern rights movement. A distinguished professor of international law, Mary Ann Glendon was given exclusive access to personal diaries and unpublished memoirs of key participants. An outstanding work of narrative history, A World Made New is the first book devoted to this crucial moment in Eleanor Roosevelt's life and in world history.

A World Made New

Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Author: Mary Ann Glendon
Publisher: Random House Incorporated
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 333
View: 1706

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Chronicles the achievement Eleanor Roosevelt was most proud of--the Universal Declaration of Human Rights--and describes her intensive efforts to forge this powerful document in the turbulent period following World War II.

Fundamental Freedoms

Eleanor Roosevelt and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Author: History An Facing History and Ourselves
Publisher: Facing History & Ourselves National Foundation, Incorporated
ISBN: 9780981954325
Category: History
Page: 280
View: 4752

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Eleanor Roosevelt played a pivotal role in creating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) in the aftermath of World War II and the Holocaust. Following the death of her husband, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, she participated in the birth of the United Nations and embraced a new role, advocating across the globe for human rights. Using original sources, this resource documents Eleanor's development into a diplomat and renowned human rights leader of the twentieth century, and shows the challenges and determination required to realize the UDHR.

Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice


Author: Jack Donnelly
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801467497
Category: Political Science
Page: 336
View: 5372

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In the third edition of his classic work, revised extensively and updated to include recent developments on the international scene, Jack Donnelly explains and defends a richly interdisciplinary account of human rights as universal rights. He shows that any conception of human rights-and the idea of human rights itself-is historically specific and contingent. Since publication of the first edition in 1989, Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice has justified Donnelly's claim that "conceptual clarity, the fruit of sound theory, can facilitate action. At the very least it can help to unmask the arguments of dictators and their allies."

René Cassin and Human Rights

From the Great War to the Universal Declaration
Author: Jay Winter,Antoine Prost
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 110735546X
Category: History
Page: N.A
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Through the life of one extraordinary man, this biography reveals what the term human rights meant to the men and women who endured two world wars, and how this major political and intellectual movement ultimately inspired and enshrined the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. René Cassin was a man of his generation, committed to moving from war to peace through international law, and whose work won him the Nobel Peace Prize in 1968. His life crossed all the major events of the first seventy years of the twentieth century, and illustrates the hopes, aspirations, failures and achievements of an entire generation. It shows how today's human rights regimes emerged from the First World War as a pacifist response to that catastrophe and how, after 1945, human rights became a way to go beyond the dangers of absolute state sovereignty, helping to create today's European project.

P. C. Chang and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights


Author: Hans Ingvar Roth
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812295471
Category: Political Science
Page: 320
View: 8322

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The Universal Declaration of Human Rights is one of the world's best-known and most translated documents. When it was presented to the United Nations General Assembly in December in 1948, Eleanor Roosevelt, chair of the writing group, called it a new "Magna Carta for all mankind." The passage of time has shown Roosevelt to have been largely correct in her prediction as to the declaration's importance. No other document in the world today can claim a comparable standing in the international community. Roosevelt and French legal expert René Cassin have often been represented as the principal authors of the declaration. But in fact, it resulted from a collaborative effort involving a number of individuals in different capacities. One of the declaration's most important authors was the vice chairman of the Human Rights Commission, Peng Chun Chang (1892-1957), a Chinese diplomat and philosopher whose contribution has been the focus of growing attention in recent years. Indeed, it is Chang who deserves the credit for the universality and religious ecumenism that are now regarded as the declaration's defining features. Despite this, Chang's extraordinary contribution has been overlooked by historians. Peng Chun Chang was a modern-day Renaissance man—teacher, scholar, university chancellor, playwright, diplomat, and politician. A true cosmopolitan, he was deeply involved in the cultural exchange between East and West, and the dramatic events of his life left a profound mark on his intellectual and political work. P. C. Chang and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is the first biography of this extraordinary actor on the world stage, who belonged to the same generation as Mao Zedong and Chiang Kai-shek. Drawing on previously unknown sources, it casts new light on Chang's multifaceted life and involvement with one of modern history's most important documents.

My Day

The Best Of Eleanor Roosevelt's Acclaimed Newspaper Columns, 1936-1962
Author: Eleanor Roosevelt,David Emblidge
Publisher: Da Capo Press
ISBN: 9780786731404
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 7316

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Recently named "Woman of the Century" in a survey conducted by the National Women's Hall of Fame, Eleanor Roosevelt wrote her hugely popular syndicated column "My Day" for over a quarter of that century, from 1936 to 1962. This collection brings together for the first time in a single volume the most memorable of those columns, written with singular wit, elegance, compassion, and insight—everything from her personal perspectives on the New Deal and World War II to the painstaking diplomacy required of her as chair of the United Nations Committee on Human Rights after the war to the joys of gardening at her beloved Hyde Park home. To quote Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., "What a remarkable woman she was! These sprightly and touching selections from Eleanor Roosevelt's famous column evoke an extraordinary personality."

The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers: The human rights years, 1949-1952


Author: Eleanor Roosevelt,Allida Mae Black
Publisher: Eleanor Roosevelt Papers
ISBN: 9780813931418
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 1135
View: 8364

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The 311 documents in this second volume of Eleanor Roosevelt’s papers trace her transformation into one of her era’s most prominent spokespersons for democracy, reveal her ongoing maturation as a political force in her own right, and detail the broader impact she had on American politics, the United Nations, and global affairs. Readers will find a fascinating view on the inner workings of President Truman’s second administration, the UN at the height of the early Cold War, and the many social and political movements that competed for influence over both. Ranging widely in substance and content, Roosevelt’s writings demonstrate a grasp of the intimate connection between domestic and international affairs that led the former first lady to support the Korean War, champion the newly founded state of Israel, demand respect for the civil rights of African Americans, and bolster the political ambitions of people like Adlai Stevenson, Helen Gahagan Douglas, and John F. Kennedy. The publication of this volume has been supported by a grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

Rights Talk

The Impoverishment of Political Discourse
Author: Mary Ann Glendon
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439108684
Category: Political Science
Page: 236
View: 2978

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Political speech in the United States is undergoing a crisis. Glendon's acclaimed book traces the evolution of the strident language of rights in America and shows how it has captured the nation's devotion to individualism and liberty, but omitted the American traditions of hospitality and care for the community.

The Forum and the Tower

How Scholars and Politicians Have Imagined the World, from Plato to Eleanor Roosevelt
Author: Mary Ann Glendon
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199843732
Category: History
Page: 280
View: 3153

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As Mary Ann Glendon writes in this fascinating new book, the relationship between politics and the academy has been fraught with tension and regret-and the occasional brilliant success-since Plato himself. In The Forum and the Tower, Glendon examines thinkers who have collaborated with leaders, from ancient Syracuse to the modern White House, in a series of brisk portraits that explore the meeting of theory and reality. Glendon discusses a roster of great names, from Edmund Burke to Alexis de Tocqueville, Machiavelli to Rousseau, John Locke to Max Weber, down to Charles Malik, who helped Eleanor Roosevelt draft the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. With each, she explores the eternal questions they faced, including: Is politics such a dirty business that I shouldn't get involved? Will I betray my principles by pursuing public office? Can I make a difference, or will my efforts be wasted? Even the most politically successful intellectuals, she notes, did not all end happily. The brilliant Marcus Tullius Cicero, for example, reached the height of power in the late Roman Republic, then fell victim to intrigue, assassinated at Mark Antony's order. Yet others had a lasting impact. The legal scholar Tribonian helped Byzantine Emperor Justinian I craft the Corpus Juris Civilis, which became a bedrock of Western law. Portalis and Napoleon emulated them, creating the civil code that the French emperor regarded as his greatest legacy. Formerly ambassador to the Vatican and an eminent legal scholar, Glendon knows these questions personally. Here she brings experience and expertise to bear in a timely, and timeless, study.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights in the 21st Century

A Living Document in a Changing World
Author: Gordon Brown
Publisher: Open Book Publishers
ISBN: 1783742216
Category: Political Science
Page: 146
View: 7428

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The Global Citizenship Commission was convened, under the leadership of former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown and the auspices of NYU’s Global Institute for Advanced Study, to re-examine the spirit and stirring words of The Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The result – this volume – offers a 21st-century commentary on the original document, furthering the work of human rights and illuminating the ideal of global citizenship. What does it mean for each of us to be members of a global community? Since 1948, the Declaration has stood as a beacon and a standard for a better world. Yet the work of making its ideals real is far from over. Hideous and systemic human rights abuses continue to be perpetrated at an alarming rate around the world. Too many people, particularly those in power, are hostile to human rights or indifferent to their claims. Meanwhile, our global interdependence deepens. Bringing together world leaders and thinkers in the fields of politics, ethics, and philosophy, the Commission set out to develop a common understanding of the meaning of global citizenship – one that arises from basic human rights and empowers every individual in the world. This landmark report affirms the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and seeks to renew the 1948 enterprise, and the very ideal of the human family, for our day and generation.

International Human Rights Law and Practice


Author: Ilias Bantekas,Lutz Oette
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316677664
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 7879

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Human rights law is a complex but compelling subject that fascinates, but often confuses, students. International Human Rights Law and Practice explores the subject from a theoretical and practical perspective, guiding students to a rich understanding of the law. The second edition has been fully revised and updated, including two new chapters on children's rights and international criminal law, and new sections on a variety of topics, including the right to equality, the protection of refugees and the effect of foreign investment and sovereign debt on the enjoyment of human rights. In addition, new case studies and interviews with practitioners, NGO activists and policymakers show how theory is applied in real life. Student learning is supported by questions to stimulate seminar discussion and further reading sections that encourage independent study. The authors' clear and engaging writing style ensures that this new edition will continue to be required reading for all students of human rights law.

The International Human Rights Movement

A History
Author: Aryeh Neier
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691135150
Category: History
Page: 379
View: 400

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"Aryeh Neier's insightful account of the human rights movement underlines the crucial role played by individuals and human rights defenders in speaking out against abuses. This book describes many of the human rights challenges that remain and is essential reading for all those wishing to understand the political challenges of our times."--Kofi Annan, former secretary-general of the United Nations (1997--2006) "Human rights has become a global movement. Aryeh Neier was present at the creation of it, so nobody is better qualified to tell the story of its ongoing and epochal fight against brutality and injustice. We can all be grateful for Neier's life of activism and we can be thankful he has reflected on it with such insight."--Michael Ignatieff, University of Toronto and former leader of the Liberal Party of Canada "Aryeh Neier has done more than anyone else to shape the values and practices of the modern human rights movement. His decades of experience give him a unique perspective to describe the key events and decisions that shaped the movement, to detail its major successes, and to outline the steps that must now be taken to meet the challenges ahead."--Kenneth Roth, executive director, Human Rights Watch "With the intimate knowledge--and authority--of one who has been at the center of the international human rights movement for more than three decades, Aryeh Neier captures the movement's uneven but steady rise to the top of the agenda of the world community. The significant transformations chronicled here, and the struggles of the brave men and women around the world that made these changes possible, form a road map for the enormous challenges that still lie ahead."--Juan E. Mendez, UN special rapporteur on torture and coauthor of Taking a Stand: The Evolution of Human Rights "This is a valuable, lucid, and timely account of the international human rights movement. Neier has the unique authority to guide the public's understanding of this complex landscape, and his book is full of information, vision, and wisdom."--Andrew J. Nathan, Columbia University

She was One of Us

Eleanor Roosevelt and the American Worker
Author: Brigid O'Farrell
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801448805
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 274
View: 7424

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Tells the story of Eleanor Roosevelt's deep and lasting ties to the American labor movement.

The United Nations and Human Rights

A Guide for a New Era
Author: Julie A Mertus,Julie Mertus
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134008015
Category: Political Science
Page: 224
View: 3067

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Julie Mertus’ highly acclaimed text continues to be the only completely up-to-date comprehensive yet succinct guide to the United Nations human rights system. Today, virtually all UN bodies and specialized agencies are undertaking efforts to incorporate the promotion or protection of human rights into their programs and activities. The United Nations and Human Rights examines these recent initiatives within the broader context of human rights practice, including the promotion of individual rights, management of international conflict and the advancement of agendas of social movements. The fully revised and updated second edition not only provides a complete guide to the development, structure and procedures within the UN human rights system, but also reflects the vital changes that have occurred within the UN system, devoting considerable attention to expanding the range of issues discussed, including: new developments in the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights the current controversy surrounding the new Human Rights Council expanded treatment of economic and social rights. A superb addition to any human rights syllabus, this book maintains its position as essential reading for students and practitioners of human rights, international relations and international law.

For All Peoples and All Nations

The Ecumenical Church and Human Rights
Author: John Nurser
Publisher: Georgetown University Press
ISBN: 9781589010598
Category: Political Science
Page: 220
View: 8532

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In this new century, born in hope but soon thereafter cloaked in terror, many see religion and politics as a volatile, if not deadly, mixture. For All Peoples and All Nations uncovers a remarkable time when that was not so; when together, those two entities gave rise to a new ideal: universal human rights. John Nurser has given life to a history almost sadly forgotten, and introduces the reader to the brilliant and heroic people of many faiths who, out of the aftermath of World War II and in the face of cynicism, dismissive animosity, and even ridicule, forged one of the world's most important secular documents, the United Nations's Universal Declaration of Human Rights. These courageous, persistent, visionary individuals -- notable among them an American Lutheran Seminary professor from Philadelphia, O. Frederick Nolde -- created the Commission on Human Rights. Eventually headed by one of the world's greatest humanitarians, Eleanor Roosevelt, the Universal Declaration has become the touchstone for political legitimacy. As David Little says in the foreword to this remarkable chronicle, "Both because of the large gap it fills in the story of the founding of the United Nations and the events surrounding the adoption of human rights, and because of the wider message it conveys about religion and peacebuilding, For All Peoples and All Nations is an immensely important contribution. We are all mightily in John Nurser's debt." If religion and politics could once find common ground in the interest of our shared humanity, there is hope that it may yet be found again.

World Report 2017

Events of 2016
Author: Human Rights Watch
Publisher: Seven Stories Press
ISBN: 1609807359
Category: Political Science
Page: 672
View: 9708

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The human rights records of more than ninety countries and territories are put into perspective in Human Rights Watch's signature yearly report. Reflecting extensive investigative work undertaken in 2016 by Human Rights Watch staff, in close partnership with domestic human rights activists, the annual World Report is an invaluable resource for journalists, diplomats, and citizens, and is a must-read for anyone interested in the fight to protect human rights in every corner of the globe. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Traditions in Turmoil


Author: Mary Ann Glendon
Publisher: Sapientia Press
ISBN: 9781932589245
Category: Religion
Page: 471
View: 8651

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Mary Ann Glendon is the Learned Hand Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. She is the President of the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences and led the Holy See's Delegation to the Fourth World Conference on Women. A brilliant legal theorist and the author of numerous books, here she sets forth her key insights on a range of the most pressing topcis facing human societies today.