A Short History of Celebrity


Author: Fred Inglis
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400834396
Category: History
Page: 328
View: 1540

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Love it or hate it, celebrity is one of the dominant features of modern life--and one of the least understood. Fred Inglis sets out to correct this problem in this entertaining and enlightening social history of modern celebrity, from eighteenth-century London to today's Hollywood. Vividly written and brimming with fascinating stories of figures whose lives mark important moments in the history of celebrity, this book explains how fame has changed over the past two-and-a-half centuries. Starting with the first modern celebrities in mid-eighteenth-century London, including Samuel Johnson and the Prince Regent, the book traces the changing nature of celebrity and celebrities through the age of the Romantic hero, the European fin de siècle, and the Gilded Age in New York and Chicago. In the twentieth century, the book covers the Jazz Age, the rise of political celebrities such as Mussolini, Hitler, and Stalin, and the democratization of celebrity in the postwar decades, as actors, rock stars, and sports heroes became the leading celebrities. Arguing that celebrity is a mirror reflecting some of the worst as well as some of the best aspects of modern history itself, Inglis considers how the lives of the rich and famous provide not only entertainment but also social cohesion and, like morality plays, examples of what--and what not--to do. This book will interest anyone who is curious about the history that lies behind one of the great preoccupations of our lives. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

A Short History of Celebrity


Author: Fred Inglis
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691135625
Category: History
Page: 328
View: 6180

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Love it or hate it, celebrity is one of the dominant features of modern life--and one of the least understood. Fred Inglis sets out to correct this problem in this entertaining and enlightening social history of modern celebrity, from eighteenth-century London to today's Hollywood. Vividly written and brimming with fascinating stories of figures whose lives mark important moments in the history of celebrity, this book explains how fame has changed over the past two-and-a-half centuries. Starting with the first modern celebrities in mid-eighteenth-century London, including Samuel Johnson and the Prince Regent, the book traces the changing nature of celebrity and celebrities through the age of the Romantic hero, the European fin de siècle, and the Gilded Age in New York and Chicago. In the twentieth century, the book covers the Jazz Age, the rise of political celebrities such as Mussolini, Hitler, and Stalin, and the democratization of celebrity in the postwar decades, as actors, rock stars, and sports heroes became the leading celebrities. Arguing that celebrity is a mirror reflecting some of the worst as well as some of the best aspects of modern history itself, Inglis considers how the lives of the rich and famous provide not only entertainment but also social cohesion and, like morality plays, examples of what--and what not--to do. This book will interest anyone who is curious about the history that lies behind one of the great preoccupations of our lives.

Celebrity in Chief

A History of the Presidents and the Culture of Stardom, With a New Epilogue on Hillary and “The Donald”
Author: Kenneth T. Walsh
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315303973
Category: Political Science
Page: 282
View: 5253

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With the advent of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton as presidential nominees, the examination of the role of celebrity culture in the White House takes on a fresh appeal. This book, by award-winning White House correspondent and presidential historian Kenneth T. Walsh, takes a detailed and comprehensive look at the history of America’s presidents as "celebrities in chief" since the beginning of the Republic. Walsh makes the point that modern presidents need to be celebrities and build on their fame in order to propel their agendas and rally public support for themselves as national leaders so that they can get things done. Combining incisive historical analysis with a journalist’s eye for detail, this book looks back to such presidents as George Washington and Abraham Lincoln as the forerunners of contemporary celebrity presidents. It examines modern presidents including Barack Obama, Bill Clinton, Ronald Reagan, John F. Kennedy, Franklin Roosevelt, and Theodore Roosevelt, each of whom qualified as a celebrity in his own time and place. The book also looks at presidents who fell short in their star appeal, such as George W. Bush, George H. W. Bush, Richard Nixon, and Lyndon Johnson, and explains why their star power was lacking. Among the special features of the book are detailed profiles of the presidents and how they measured up or failed as celebrities; an historical analysis of America’s popular culture and how presidents have played a part in it, from sports and television to movies and the news media; the role of first ladies; and a portfolio of fascinating photos illustrating the intersection of the presidency with popular culture. An update looking at Hillary and "the Donald" puts contemporary politics in perspective with the evolution of presidential celebrity.

Notes on Fame

FREE PREVIEW BOOKLET
Author: Tom Payne
Publisher: Picador
ISBN: 1429991720
Category: Social Science
Page: 288
View: 8933

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A free preview collection of essays from Tom Payne, author of FAME We may regard celebrities as deities, but that does not mean we worship them with deference. From prehistory to the present, humanity has possessed a primal urge first to exalt the famous but then to cut them down (Michael Jackson, anyone?). Why do we treat the ones we love like burnt offerings in a ritual of human sacrifice? Perhaps because that is exactly what they are. In this collection of essays, Tom Payne -- of the website Popcropolis and the "trenchant, unsettling, and darkly hilarious" Fame (New York Times Book Review) -- draws the narratives of the past and the immediate present into one intriguing story. INCLUDES AN EXCERPT FROM FAME!

Celebrity Culture and the American Dream

Stardom and Social Mobility
Author: Karen Sternheimer
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317689682
Category: Social Science
Page: 274
View: 6609

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Celebrity Culture and the American Dream, Second Edition considers how major economic and historical factors shaped the nature of celebrity culture as we know it today, retaining the first edition’s examples from the first celebrity fan magazines of 1911 to the present and expanding to include updated examples and additional discussion on the role of the internet and social media in today’s celebrity culture. Equally important, the book explains how and why the story of Hollywood celebrities matters, sociologically speaking, to an understanding of American society, to the changing nature of the American Dream, and to the relation between class and culture. This book is an ideal addition to courses on inequalities, celebrity culture, media, and cultural studies.

Las Vegas Weddings

A Brief History, Celebrity Gossip, Everything Elvis, and the Complete Chapel Guide
Author: Susan Marg
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0060726199
Category: Reference
Page: 304
View: 9260

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Fast, fun, and incredibly well researched, Las Vegas Weddings is the ultimate guide to getting hitched, Elvis style. Covering everything from the rise of the town to legendary star marriages and an entire section devoted to "The King," it even has a chapel guide to help budding young couples plan their own Vegas wedding getaway. Filled with rare photographs and never-before-heard stories, it also includes: Colorful descriptions of the town's funky stand-alone chapels and the Strip's swankiest resorts A unique look at Elvis impersonators More than fifty celebrity weddings, from Angelina Jolie and Billy Bob Thorton to Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward Theme weddings, like Star Trek, Camelot, or Elvis's Blue Hawaii And much, much more

Illusions of Immortality

A Psychology of Fame and Celebrity
Author: David Giles
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 1137219491
Category: Psychology
Page: 200
View: 9542

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What drives people to crave fame and celebrity? How does fame affect people psychologically? These issues are frequently discussed by the media but up till now psychologists have shied away from an academic away from an academic investigation of the phenomenon of fame. In this lively, eclectic book David Giles examines fame and celebrity from a variety of perspectives. He argues that fame should be seen as a process rather than a state of being, and that `celebrity' has largely emerged through the technological developments of the last 150 years. Part of our problem in dealing with celebrities, and the problem celebrities have dealing with the public, is that the social conditions produced by the explosion in mass communications have irrevocably altered the way we live. However we know little about many of the phenomena these conditions have produced - such as the `parasocial interaction' between television viewers and media characters, and the quasi-religious activity of `fans'. Perhaps the biggest single dilemma for celebrities is the fact that the vehicle that creates fame for them - the media - is also their tormentor. To address these questions, David Giles draws on research from psychology, sociology, media and communications studies, history and anthropology - as well as his own experiences as a music journalist in the 1980s. He argues that the history of fame is inextricably linked to the emergence of the individual self as a central theme of Western culture, and considers how the desire for authenticity, as well as individual privacy, have created anxieties for celebrities which are best understood in their historical and cultural context.

John Wayne's America


Author: Garry Wills
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439129576
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 878

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The Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Lincoln at Gettysburg brings his eloquence, wit, and on-target perceptions of American life and politics to this fascinating, well-drawn protrait of a twentieth-century hero. In this work of great originality—the biography of an idea—Garry Wills shows how John Wayne came to embody Amercian values and influenced our cultoure to a degree unmatched by any other public figure of his time. In Wills's hands, Waynes story is tranformed into a compelling narrative about the intersection of popular entertainment and political realities in mid-twentieth-century America.

The Last Days of Dead Celebrities


Author: Mitchell Fink
Publisher: Miramax Books
ISBN: 9781401360252
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 352
View: 3622

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Profiled on ABC's The View, Good Morning America, and dozens of other national outlets, The Last Days of Dead Celebrities captured our imagination with its intelligent, intimate reporting. John Lennon, Lucille Ball, Orson Welles, Ted Williams, John Denver -- these are just a few of the fifteen celebrities profiled here, each passing in a way that was as unique and distinctive as the life of the individual. Some slipped quietly into the night -- Welles died peacefully in bed with his typewriter still balanced on his stomach -- while others met a more shocking and violent end, as did Lennon and Tupac Shakur. Working with an extraordinary level of access, exclusive material, and the cooperation of the stars family and friends, Mitchell Fink sets the record straight on these very human, very vulnerable public figures.

Understanding Celebrity


Author: Graeme Turner
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1446292711
Category: Social Science
Page: 184
View: 5401

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“An outstanding achievement... Graeme Turner writes with power and persuasion, and brilliantly explores what it is about celebrity today that should concern us all” - Sean Redmond, Deakin University “A key touchstone for celebrity studies. Turner thoughtfully illuminates the variety of production and consumption practices through which celebrity circulates today, whilst remaining sensitive to the complexity of power relations in play. An essential read for students and scholars in the field” - Sue Holmes, University of East Anglia “Cements Turner’s status as the most important figure in celebrity studies... Turner’s gaze fixes on developments in digital, social and global mediascapes, drawing media and celebrity studies into complex critical, political and cultural debates in his indomitable style" - James Bennett, Royal Holloway, University of London “An extraordinary synthesis of research and theory... Understanding Celebrity remains the go-to text of celebrity studies" - Joshua Gamsom, University of San Francisco Where does the production of celebrity end and its consumption begin? Platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and reality TV allow us a previously unimagined engagement with the manufactured 'persona' of celebrity. Understanding Celebrity has become the go-to text for understanding the connection between the production and consumption of this 'persona'. The long-awaited second edition assesses the changing nature of this pivotal relationship in celebrity studies. The book: Explains how social media is key in establishing an online presence for celebrities Critically analyses the changing nature of fan culture within the online environment Delves into a richer and more detailed account of the history of celebrity Examines in greater depth the increased role of reality TV Incorporates recent contributions from feminist scholars to the field Enriched with new examples drawn from popular culture, this is a contemporary and incisive look at celebrity studies. Understanding Celebrity is not only an essential text, but a stimulating read for students studying celebrity and popular culture across media studies, cultural studies and sociology.

Internet Celebrity

Understanding Fame Online
Author: Crystal Abidin
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 1787560767
Category: Social Science
Page: 120
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This book presents a framework for thinking about different forms of internet celebrity that have emerged in the last decade. Through cross-cultural case studies, the book offers a brief history of internet celebrity; analysis on recent developments in the industry; and commentary on emergent trends.

Celebrity Watches


Author: Vincent Daveau
Publisher: Angel Island Association
ISBN: 9780760338360
Category: Antiques & Collectibles
Page: 160
View: 4696

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A full-color volume showcases a series of elegant watches and the celebrities who love them, from Steve McQueen and his TAG Heuer Monaco in Le Mans to James Bond's tricky Rolexes, in a book that also includes timepieces worn by Paul Newman, Marilyn Monroe, John and Jackie Kennedy, Claudia Schiffer and more.

Gods Like Us

On Movie Stardom and Modern Fame
Author: Ty Burr
Publisher: Anchor Books
ISBN: 0307390845
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 413
View: 7771

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Offers a history of stardom, from the early years of cinema through the reality stars of the Internet age, offering anecdotes and explorations of the ways in which fame both reflects and obscures the people behind the celebrity image.

A Companion to Celebrity


Author: P. David Marshall,Sean Redmond
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118475011
Category: Social Science
Page: 560
View: 1852

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"Companion to Celebrity" presents a multi-disciplinary collection of original essays that explore myriad issues relating to the origins, evolution, and current trends in the field of celebrity studies. Offers a detailed, systematic, and clear presentation of all aspects of celebrity studies, with a structure that carefully build its enquiry Draws on the latest scholarly developments in celebrity analyses Presents new and provocative ways of exploring celebrity's meanings and textures Considers the revolutionary ways in which new social media have impacted on the production and consumption of celebrity

Rock Star

The Making of Musical Icons from Elvis to Springsteen
Author: David R. Shumway
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421413922
Category: History
Page: 264
View: 6610

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Shumway investigates the rock star as a particular kind of cultural construction, different from mere celebrity. After the golden age of moviemaking, media exposure allowed rock stars more political sway than Hollywood's studio stars, and rock stars gradually replaced movie stars as key cultural heroes

I'll Have What She's Having

My Adventures in Celebrity Dieting
Author: Rebecca Harrington
Publisher: Virago
ISBN: 0349006040
Category: Humor
Page: 176
View: 4726

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Rebecca Harrington leaves no cabbage soup unstirred in I'll Have What She's Having, her wickedly funny, wildly absurd quest to diet like the stars. Elizabeth Taylor mixed cottage cheese and sour cream; Madonna subsisted on 'sea vegetables' and Marilyn Monroe drank raw eggs whipped with warm milk. Where there is a Hollywood starlet offering nutritional advice, there is a diet Rebecca Harrington is willing to try. Facing a harrowing mix of fainting spells, pimples and salmonella, Harrington tracks down illegal haggis to imitate Pippa Middleton, paces her apartment until the wee hours drinking ten Diet Cokes ? la Karl Lagerfeld, and attempts something forbiddingly known as the 'Salt Water Flush' to channel her inner Beyonc?. Rebecca Harrington risks kitchen fires and mysterious face rashes, all in the name of diet journalism. Taking cues from noted beauty icons like Posh Spice (alkaline!), Sophia Loren (pasta!) and Cameron Diaz (savory oatmeal!), I'll Have What She's Having is completely surprising, occasionally unappetising, and always outrageously funny.

Public Images

Celebrity, Photojournalism, and the Making of the Tabloid Press
Author: Ryan Linkof
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1474243975
Category: Photography
Page: 256
View: 7536

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The stolen snapshot is a staple of the modern tabloid press, as ubiquitous as it is notorious. The first in-depth history of British tabloid photojournalism, this book explores the origin of the unauthorised celebrity photograph in the early 20th century, tracing its rise in the 1900s through to the first legal trial concerning the right to privacy from photographers shortly after the Second World War. Packed with case studies from the glamorous to the infamous, the book argues that the candid snap was a tabloid innovation that drew its power from Britain's unique class tensions. Used by papers such as the Daily Mirror and Daily Sketch as a vehicle of mass communication, this new form of image played an important and often overlooked role in constructing the idea of the press photographer as a documentary eyewitness. From Edward VIII and Wallis Simpson to aristocratic debutantes Lady Diana Cooper and Margaret Whigham, the rage of the social elite at being pictured so intimately without permission was matched only by the fascination of working class readers, while the relationship of the British press to social, economic and political power was changed forever. Initially pioneered in the metropole, tabloid-style photojournalism soon penetrated the journalistic culture of most of the globe. This in-depth account of its social and cultural history is an invaluable source of new research for historians of photography, journalism, visual culture, media and celebrity studies.

The "S" Word

A Short History of an American Tradition...Socialism
Author: John Nichols
Publisher: Verso
ISBN: 184467679X
Category: History
Page: 307
View: 6896

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In response to the recent political red-baiting by some conservatives, the author offers a history of American socialism, highlighting such prominent socialists as Eugene V. Debs, Horace Greeley and Helen Keller and arguing that the United States owes many of its basic institutions, such as Social Security, to the ideas and efforts of American socialists. Original.

Celebrity Capital

Assessing the Value of Fame
Author: Barrie Gunter
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1628927372
Category: Social Science
Page: 264
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Celebrities attract the attention of commercial interests and other public figures. They receive payments from sponsors to endorse brands. They are sought out to appear with politicians during election campaigns. They are used to promote health messages. In other words, celebrities are often perceived to possess qualities that give them special value or what we will refer to here as 'celebrity capital'. This means that celebrities are regarded as being able to add premium value to specific objects, events, and issues and hence render these items more valuable or effective. Employing an interesting and new approach to the growing scholarly interest in celebrity culture, Barrie Gunter uses the idea of value as expressed through the term 'capital'. Capital usually refers to the monetary worth of something. Celebrity capital however can be measured in economic terms but also in social, political and psychological terms. Research from around the world has been collated to provide an evidence-based analysis of the value of celebrity in the 21st century and how it can be systematically assessed. Including further reading for students, key points and end of chapter discussion questions, Gunter creates the first methodology to assess the value of fame.

Fashion and Celebrity Culture


Author: Pamela Church Gibson
Publisher: Berg
ISBN: 0857852302
Category: Design
Page: 304
View: 8611

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The interrelationship between fashion and celebrity is now a salient and pervasive feature of the media world. This accessible text presents the first in-depth study of the phenomenon, assessing the degree to which celebrity culture has reshaped the fashion system. Fashion and Celebrity Culture critically examines the history of this relationship from its growth in the nineteenth century to its mutation during the twentieth century to the dramatic changes that have befallen it in the last two decades. It addresses the fashion-celebrity nexus as it plays itself out across mainstream cinema, television and music and in the celebrity status of a range of designers, models and artists. It explores the strategies that have enabled visual culture to recast itself in the new climate of celebrity obsession, popular culture and the art world to respond adaptively to its insistent pressures. With its engaging analysis and case studies from Lillian Gish to Louis Vuitton to Lady Gaga, Fashion and Celebrity Culture is of major interest to students of fashion, media studies, film, television studies and popular culture, and anyone with an interest in this global phenomenon.